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How To Care For Your Christmas Sweaters

T’is the season to be jolly and for your wardrobes to be packed with Christmas sweaters! After all, it wouldn’t feel the same without them – they set the tone and are great for those family pictures. However, not looking after your sweaters can ruin the most wonderful time of the year. To spread the festive cheer, we’ll guide you on how to care for your Christmas sweaters!

care for your christmas sweater

Read The Care Label

To avoid any laundry mistakes, shrinkage or material being ruined, it’s best to read the label for the best care for your Christmas sweaters. The label should say what type of cycle/settings to use on your washing machine.

If you don’t come across a label, we do recommend washing it depending on the material it is made from.

Wool Christmas Sweaters

Wool Christmas Sweaters

Many Christmas sweaters are made of wool so they should be washed on the wool cycle in your washing machine with low-temperature settings. The great thing about wool, as a material, is that it’s an antibacterial material so you won’t need to wash it regularly.

We strongly advise against putting your wool garment in the tumble dryer because it doesn’t react well to heat.

Cashmere Christmas Sweaters

Cashmere is no different to wool when it comes to caring instructions. It should be washed on low-temperature settings on the washing machine and much like wool, it should never be tumble dried.

We also suggest washing your cashmere sweaters by hand, in warm water, for the best results.

We hope this guide has given you great insights on how to properly care for your Christmas sweaters!

Christmas is the most wonderful time of the year, especially with a well-cleaned and stain-free Christmas sweater!

If the festive season is keeping you too busy to do your laundry, don’t worry – Laundryheap is available to help!

Just book a service so we can collect your laundry, clean them to perfection and bring them back to you within 24 hours!

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To learn more about Laundryheap, visit our website or download the free app on iOS or Android.


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Clothes That Don’t Need Dry-Cleaning

Dry cleaning brings more life to our clothes. While some clothes will remain in great shape after they’ve been dry-cleaned, others don’t have the same luck due to the chemical solvent used during the dry-cleaning process. In this blog, we’ll list the clothes that don’t need dry cleaning.

clothes air-drying

1. Wool

While it is true that wool can be dry-cleaned, you should still be cautious and not dry-clean it after every use as you are risking ruining the fabric. As a rule of thumb, always wash it manually with cold water and soap because wool falls on the list of clothes that don’t need dry cleaning.

Clothes that don't need dry-cleaning - wool

2. Cotton T-Shirts

It’s inevitable that cotton t-shirts will get dirt and stains on them, but the good news is that they don’t require dry cleaning. Instead, a good old-fashioned way of putting them in the washing machine and dryer will keep them as good as new.

clothes that don't need dry-cleaning - cotton t-shirts

3. Cashmere

Cashmere is a high-quality fabric and unfortunately, it can lose its shape and shrink if dry-cleaned. To take care of your cashmere, it’s recommended you hand wash it with lukewarm water plus added laundry detergent.

Cashmere - clothes that don't need dry-cleaning
Photo by Ylanite Koppens

4. Synthetics

Most of your daily clothes are made from fabrics such as nylon, spandex and polyester. These also are clothes that don’t need dry-cleaning and are totally safe to be put in the washing machine.

Clothes that don't need dry-cleaning - polyester scarf

5. PVC, Polyurethane and plastic

In addition, PVC, polyurethane, and plastic clothing don’t need to be dry-cleaned because they’ll get ruined during the process.

Photo by Greta Hoffman

Whenever laundering or dry-cleaning your clothes, it’s best to read the care labels on clothes to be certain. Dry cleaning is a gift that can do a brilliant job when used on the right fabrics.

A friendly reminder Laundryheap does offer dry cleaning services! If your clothes need dry cleaning, just get in touch with us and we’ll be there to help you!

laundryheap - laundry delivery service - dry-cleaning

To learn more about Laundryheap, visit our website or download the free app on iOS or Android.


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How To Tie A Headscarf

The Headscarf has a storied history dating back to Ancient Rome and the Middle East. Today, the headscarf is still important to religious groups and the fashion industry. if you’re interested in wearing one, we will walk you through how to tie a headscarf!

First things first, before learning to tie a headscarf, we recommend the square headscarves as they’re beginner-friendly and there is a lot more you can do with them, stylistically.

Here are three popular headscarves and the steps to tie them below.

  • Rosette Wrap
  • Boho Headscarf
  • Babushka

Rosette Wrap

One popular headscarf style is the Rosette Wrap.

To tie your headscarf using this style:

  1. Tie your hair so it becomes a ponytail.
  2. Fold the scarf and create a triangle.
  3. After you’ve folded your scarf, put the ends of the scarf to the front of your forehead.
  4. Twists the ends together leading into a spiral
  5. Lastly, tuck the ends in to secure the scarf.

Boho Headscarf

The boho headscarf is suited for the hot weather and will cover (no pun intended) the summer look essentials! To get started:

  1. Fold your scarf in half to form a triangle.
  2. Wrap it around your forehead and tie the knot in the back.
  3. The corner of your scarf should be hanging down in the back.
  4. Make sure it is tight and comfortable as you tie the headscarf!

Babushka Headscarf

It’s easy to fall in love with the classic Babushka style and get inspired to tie a headscarf. This style is typically worn over the hair and tied below the chin.

What makes this headscarf style cool is that it will keep your hair in place! Whether you’re rushing to open the front door or going out in the rain or wind, the Babushka will cover your hair!

To tie this headscarf:

  1. Start by folding it in half to make a triangle.
  2. Simply place the folded edge on the top of your head (it needs to be centred).
  3. Take the two opposing ends and knot them under your chin. It’s as easy as 123!

Considering headscarves are fabric, take good care of them and be sure to check if they’re suited to be dry cleaned!

If you need your headscarves to be dry cleaned and look sharp, head over to the Laundryheap website to book your dry cleaning today!

You can also download the Laundryheap app on iOS or Android!

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Freshen up your trainers 

Photo by Alex B. from Pexels

Trainers are perfect for throwing on when we know that we’re going to be on our feet all day, or when we are exercising. Unfortunately, this means that they often end up smelling unpleasant. Luckily, these methods will freshen up your trainers in no time. 

  • Bicarbonate of soda
  • Dry shampoo
  • Teabags
  • Newspaper
  • Dryer sheets
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Washing machine

Bicarbonate of soda 

Bicarbonate of soda is amazing for removing odours as the fine powder is incredibly absorbent. Sprinkle a thin layer of bicarbonate of soda in each shoe and leave it to sit for 24 hours. After 24 hours, shake the powder from your shoes and marvel at their fresh smell. For an even fresher smell add a couple of drops of essential oil to your bicarbonate of soda. 

Image by Aqua Mechanical

Dry shampoo 

When used for its intended purpose, dry shampoo soaks up the oils in your hair and is usually scented to make it smell fresher. Spraying it on your trainers works in exactly the same way. Spray a liberal amount of dry shampoo in your shoes and leave them to sit for 24 hours. After 24 hours they will be ready to wear and smelling beautifully fresh, and oddly like your hair… 

Photo by Ray Piedra from Pexels

Teabags 

Breakfast teabags contain tannins which help to kill bacteria and eliminate odours. Put your teabags, one for each shoe, in boiling water for 2-3 minutes, before removing them and leaving them to cool. Once your teabags have cooled, place one in each shoe and leave them for 1 hour. After an hour, remove the teabags from your shoes and soak up any excess tea. Be warned that the tannin can stain so you may be left with a brownish stain inside your trainer, but at least they’ll smell fresh. 

Photo by freestocks.org from Pexels

Newspaper  

Foul-smelling trainers are often caused by the moisture created from wearing them all day. This moisture creates the perfect breeding ground for bacteria. To absorb this moisture, scrunch up newspaper, tissue paper, or a paper bag, and stuff it inside your trainers. Leave the paper for 24 hours before taking it out and wearing your trainers. To help eliminate odours, add a few drops of essential oil to the paper. 

Photo by Suzy Hazelwood from Pexels

Dryer sheets 

Dryer sheets do exactly as their name suggests and suck the moisture from their surroundings. If you don’t have any newspaper, dryer sheets will absorb the moisture in your trainers in exactly the same way. Simply scrunch a dryer sheet for each shoe and insert it in your trainers. Take the sheet out the next time you want to wear your trainers and enjoy the freshness. You can also use dryer sheets to eliminate odours from the area you store your trainers, such as your gym bag. Just place a dryer sheet in the area and leave it to soak up any moisture. 

Photo by RUN 4 FFWPU from Pexels

Rubbing alcohol

Rubbing alcohol kills odour-causing bacteria, making it the perfect thing to use on your trainers. You can either put rubbing alcohol into a spray bottle and spray the inside of your trainers or apply the rubbing alcohol to cotton balls/pads and use them to wipe the inside of your trainers. Not only is rubbing alcohol great at eliminating odours, but if your trainers can be wiped clean, you can use it to freshen the outside of them as well. A double win. 

Image by ajay_suresh

Washing machine 

If you want to give your trainers a thorough freshen, it’s best to use the washing machine. Before putting your trainers in the washing machine, first, check their care labels to make sure that they are machine washable. If your trainers are machine washable, remove the soles and laces before putting your trainers in a pillowcase. This will protect them from the harsh cycle of the washing machine and also help soften the noise as they are spun. Put your machine on a gentle cycle, and let your trainers spin. Once they have finished their cycle, take them out and leave them to air dry. Never put your trainers in the tumble dryer as the heat will warp the material and cause irreversible damage. Make sure that your trainers are completely dry before wearing them or you risk creating an even worse smell! 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Whilst you are freshening up your trainers, let us tackle the rest of your laundry. Book your Laundryheap order by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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Parka jacket care guide 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Parka jackets are often thick-lined and accompanied by a fur hood, making them the perfect winter jacket. To adequately care for your parka, follow this guide carefully. 

  • Always check the label
  • Remove any fur
  • Machine wash
  • Use detergent and only detergent 
  • Tumble dry
  • Clean your fur 
  • Store 

Always check the label 

Before washing your parka jacket, or any item for that matter, you must check the care label. The care label will give you all of the information that you need to guarantee that you are washing your item in the safest possible way. If your care label specifies that your jacket is dry clean only, do not try and wash it yourself. This will only lead to your jacket becoming damaged. 

Image by 邰秉宥

Remove any fur 

Parka jackets will usually come with a detachable fur trim hood. Remove this hood and set it to one side as it needs to be cleaned using a separate method. If you do not, it can become damaged in the wash and unwearable. 

Photo by Nikolai Ulltang from Pexels

Machine wash 

Once you have detached your hood, you are safe to machine wash your jacket. It’s best to use a down-specific laundry detergent as these are specifically formulated for jackets, such as parkas. Alternatively, you can use a gentle laundry detergent. Use a cool or warm water setting on your machine that will not be overly aggressive on your jacket and unintentionally cause any damage. Finally, Before you begin your wash, make sure that there is nothing else in your machine. Your parka jacket should not be washed with any other items of clothing.

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Use detergent and only detergent  

You may be tempered to add fabric softener to your washing machine, but don’t. The only thing that you need to effectively wash your parka jacket is detergent. Adding additional chemicals to your machine can lead to irreversible damage. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Tumble dry

Now that your parka jacket is washed, it’s time to dry it. The most effective way to dry your jacket is on a low heat setting in the tumble dryer. Don’t set your tumble dryer’s temperature too high or you risk scorching the fibres of your jacket. Instead, use a low temperature and add a few wool dryer balls to help fluff the down and prevent it from clumping together. 

Photo by Dan Smith from Pexels

Clean your fur 

Whilst your parka jacket is drying, it’s time to clean your fur trim. Begin by filling a basin with cool water and adding 1-2 teaspoons of gentle detergent. Completely submerge your fur in the mixture, gently moving it through the water for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, lift out the fur and gently squeeze it to remove as much soapy water as possible. To remove the remaining suds, refill your basin with clean water, and rinse your collar until all of the suds have been removed. Next, gently squeeze out as much excess water as possible by rolling it in a thick bath towel. Finally, allow your fur to completely air dry– this could take up to 48 hours. Once dry, use a soft-bristled brush to lift any matted fur, before reattaching it to your clean parka jacket. 

Photo by ArtHouse Studio from Pexels

Store 

Now that your parka jacket and collar is clean, hang it up on a wooden coat hanger in an airy room. This will keep it looking and smelling fresh until you decide to wear it again. 

Photo by Alexander Kovalev from Pexels

The best way to care for your parka jacket is to let Laundryheap do it for you. To book your Laundryheap order simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to care for your winter warmers

Photo by Pavel Danilyuk from Pexels

It’s going to take more than just a coat to keep you warm this winter. Luckily, your trusty winter warmers are here to help. Just make sure that you look after them by following our handy guide. 

  • Hat
  • Scarf
  • Gloves

Hat 

10% of your body’s heat is lost through your head. Luckily, a warm hat will help prevent this heat from being lost. In winter, the most common type of hat to wear is a beanie, a close-fitting hat that clings to the head and can be worn over the ears. In the autumn and winter seasons, you will find yourself wearing your hat most, if not every, day, so to keep it clean it’s best to wash it 3-5 times each season. 

Machine wash 

Most beanie hats are made from polyester or wool and cotton blends, which are safe to wash in the washing machine. Before machine washing your beanie, first, check the care label. This will tell you if you can wash your hat in the washing machine and, if you can, what temperature and cycle to use. 

To machine wash your beanie, first put it in a laundry bag to prevent it from being snagged in the machine. Next, select a cool wash setting, ideally 30 degrees Celsius, and a gentle cycle. Beanies are made to be stretchy so that they can fit over your head, however, they can stretch in the washing machine and become misshapen. A gentle cycle and cool temperature will help to prevent this from happening. 

Hand wash 

If you are worried about machine washing your beanie, hand wash it instead.

To begin hand washing your beanie, first fill a sink with cool water and add a teaspoon of mild laundry detergent. Submerge your hat in the water, and gently move it around. Make sure that you are not wringing or scrubbing your beanie whilst it’s in the water as this will cause it to stretch. Gently swirl your hat in the water for roughly 5 minutes. If it is heavily stained, allow your hat to sit in the water for 15-30 minutes so that the dirt and oils can break down and be removed. 

After you have washed your beanie remove it from the detergent water and submerge it in fresh, cold, water. Swirl your hat in the fresh water until all of the detergent has been removed- you will need to replenish your water frequently until no more detergent is released. You may be tempted to hold your beanie under a stream of cool water, however, this will only result in it stretching.  

Drying 

Regardless of how you wash your beanie, the drying process is the same. Lay your beanie flat on a clean, dry, towel, and lay another clean, dry, towel over the top of it. Leave your top towel over your beanie for a few minutes to soak up as much excess water as possible, before removing it completely to finish air-drying. Do not wring or twist your beanie to remove water, or use a tumble dryer, as this will stretch and misshapen your hat. Leave your beanie to completely dry before wearing it. 

Photo by Yan Krukov from Pexels

Scarf 

A scarf is perfect for keeping your neck warm whilst you brave the brisk winter day. Most winter scarves are made from cotton, wool, or cashmere as these materials are thick and therefore better at keeping you warm. To ensure that your scarf keeps you warm throughout autumn and winter, wash it 3-5 times per season. 

Machine wash 

Washing machines are too harsh for some materials, such as wool and cashmere, so before washing your winter scarf make sure that it is made from cotton or polyester. 

After checking that your scarf is safe to machine wash, place it in a laundry bag and into your washing machine. The laundry bag will ensure that your scarf doesn’t get snagged whilst being washed. Next, select a gentle and cold water cycle on your machine. Even though your scarf’s material is safe to machine wash, it is still delicate and therefore needs to be washed using a delicate cycle. Finally, add gentle laundry detergent to your machine and begin the wash cycle. Make sure that you are using a gentle laundry detergent as they are softer on fabrics and don’t contain dyes or harsh chemicals

Hand wash 

If your scarf is made from wool, cashmere, or any other delicate material, it must be hand-washed only. 

To begin hand washing your scarf, fill a sink with cold water and add 1 tablespoon of gentle laundry detergent. Completely submerge your scarf in your detergent water and gently swish it around. You may want to gently squeeze each section of your scarf to ensure that it is absorbing as much water as possible. After you have swished your scarf in the water a few times, leave it to sit for 10 minutes, giving it ample time to soak up as much detergent as possible. 

After 10 minutes, remove your scarf from the detergent water and rinse it under a cool running tap. Make sure that your tap is on a low water pressure to avoid any damage to the fibres of your scarf. Avoid wringing or twisting your scarf whilst you are rinsing it as this can also damage its fibres. Continue to rinse your scarf under the cool running tap until no more detergent runs from it. 

Drying 

Unless your winter scarf is made from fleece, you should never use a tumble dryer to dry your scarf. Instead, lay it flat on a clean, dry, towel, and place another clean, dry, towel over the top of it. Gently press down on the top towel to remove as much excess water as possible. After removing as much water as possible, remove the top towel, and leave your scarf to air dry. If your scarf is made from cotton or polyester, you can hang it on a clothes horse or outside to continue air drying

If your scarf is made of fleece, you can dry it on a low heat setting in your tumble dryer. Make sure that you are not using a high heat setting as this will damage the fibres of your scarf. 

Photo by Arina Krasnikova from Pexels

Gloves

When your hands get cold they become stiff and achy, not a particularly pleasant feeling. Gloves keep your hands warm and mobile by insulating them. To ensure that they stay in top shape, wash your gloves roughly 3-5 times each season.   

Machine wash 

Gloves can be made from a variety of different materials, however, cotton or those made with synthetic fibres are the only ones that can be machine washed. Before machine washing your gloves, check their care label to make sure that they are safe to wash in the washing machine. 

To machine wash your gloves, first put them in a laundry bag and then into the washing machine. This will firstly ensure that your gloves don’t get snagged whilst in the machine, and secondly prevent them from getting lost. Next, select a cold and gentle wash cycle that won’t be too abrasive on the fibres of your gloves. Finally, add oxygen bleach to your wash and begin your cycle. Oxygen bleach will help keep the colour of your gloves vibrant, whilst killing any bacteria that may be on your gloves. 

Hand wash 

If your gloves are not made from cotton or synthetic fibres, then you will have to hand wash them. Not all gloves can be hand washed in the same way though. 

Leather and faux leather 

To clean your leather gloves, first use an oil-based soap to remove any stains. Gently rub the soap onto your gloves, paying extra attention to the heavily stained areas, before setting to one side to dry. 

Once your gloves have dried, use a microfiber cloth to polish your gloves. This will help keep them looking shiny. Be careful not to press too hard with your microfiber cloth as this could lead to scratching the leather of your gloves. 

Once you have cleaned the outside of your leather gloves, sprinkle a light dusting of corn-starch or baking soda inside your glove. The powdery particles will absorb any oils and odours inside your gloves, leaving them smelling good as new. Leave your corn-starch or baking soda for 15 minutes, before shaking it out of each glove. 

Wool

To hand-wash your wool gloves, begin by filling a sink with warm water and adding a drop of gentle laundry detergent. Make sure that you are only using a drop of detergent as gloves are reasonably small and don’t require a lot of detergent

Next, submerge your gloves in the detergent water and use a swishing motion to allow the detergent to soak into each glove. Leave your gloves for 10-15 minutes, before draining the detergent water and re-filling the sink with fresh, warm, water. 

Repeat the swishing motion with your gloves, removing all of the detergent from each one. You will have to refill your sink with fresh water each time it becomes too soapy. Once you have removed the detergent from your gloves, drain the water and leave your gloves at the bottom of your empty sink. Using your hands, gently push down on each glove to remove as much excess water as possible. 

Waterproof 

Waterproof gloves are often used for skiing and don’t require much cleaning. To clean your waterproof gloves, generously spray the outside of each glove with alcohol or hydrogen peroxide. This will help disinfect the outside of your gloves. To clean the inside of your gloves, sprinkle either corn-starch or baking soda into each glove and leave it for 15 minutes. The powder will work in the same way as with leather gloves, removing oils and odours. 

Drying 

Regardless of what material your gloves are made from you must avoid using the tumble dryer to dry them. Your waterproof and leather gloves won’t require drying because they have not come into contact with water. 

To dry your cotton and wool gloves place the gloves on a clean, dry, towel and roll the towel up so that the gloves are encased. This will help squeeze any excess water from each glove without causing them to lose their shape. After a few minutes, unroll the towel and rearrange your gloves so that they are lying flat. Leave your gloves in this position to air dry, refraining from wearing them until they are completely dry. 

Photo by Victoria Borodinova from Pexels

The best way to take care of your winter warmers is by letting us take care of them. We can pick up, launder, and have your hats, scarves, and gloves back to you, and ready to wear, within 24 hours. All you have to do is head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to book your order.


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Pea coat care guide

Photo by MART PRODUCTION from Pexels

As we adjust to the autumn weather, it’s time to dig out and brush off our jackets. The best way to ensure that your jacket lasts the whole autumn and winter season is to properly care for it. This is your pea coat care guide

  • Remove lint, pet hair, and debris
  • Make repairs
  • Pre-wash 
  • Pre-treat 
  • Machine wash
  • Hand wash 
  • Dry

Remove lint, pet hair, and debris 

Pea coats, and coats in general, only need to be washed twice a season. To ensure that your pea coat stays in top condition between washes, remove lint, pet hair, and debris once a week. Hang your coat on a hanger, where you can clearly see it. Using a soft-bristled brush, gently brush away any debris that you can see. Then, use a lint brush to remove any lingering lint and/or pet hair. If you don’t own a lint brush, sticky tape works just as well. Make sure that you do both the front and back of your coat, not forgetting the arms as well. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Make repairs 

Rips, tears, and holes can be expected when you’re wearing a coat on a regular basis, especially if you have owned said coat for a number of years. Luckily, pea coats are often made from wool or a similar material, so any damage is easily fixed. Simply sew the damage up using a needle and thread the same colour as your jacket. Small rips and holes don’t require any special sewing skills, however, if the damage is more advanced, you may want to take it to a tailor. It’s always better to get small repairs done on a well-loved coat than buy a new one. 

Photo by Suzy Hazelwood from Pexels

Pre-wash

When the time comes to wash your pea coat, it’s important to make sure that you empty all of your pockets. You don’t want to wash your coat, only to realise that there was a tissue in your pocket that is now stuck to your coat forever. Once you have emptied your pockets, zip-up any zips and fasten any fastenings, except for buttons as this could stretch your pea coat out of shape. After you have made sure that your pockets are emptied and fastened any fastenings, your coat is ready to be washed

Pre-treat

Before you wash your pea coat, check for stains. The most important places to check for stains are the collar and cuffs of your coat. If you do find stains, simply mix a solution of mild laundry detergent and water, and gently rub this directly onto the stain. You can use your fingers or a soft-bristled brush, but be gentle to avoid damaging your coat and setting the stain further into it. Leave your pre-treatment for 15 minutes, giving it ample time to penetrate the stains. After 15 minutes, your coat will be ready to wash

Photo by Brittney Borowski from Pexels

Machine wash 

To machine wash your pea coat, first turn your coat inside out and place it in a laundry bag. This will ensure that your coat isn’t damaged in the washing machine. Set your washing machine to a delicate, cool temperature cycle. Avoid using a hot wash setting as this will damage the delicate fibres of your coat. If your washing machine has a wool-specific setting, use that rather than a delicate cycle. Finally, add a gentle laundry detergent to your machine. Make sure that you are using a gentle laundry detergent as this will dissolve any dirt on your clothing without being too harsh.

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Hand wash 

If you would prefer to hand wash your pea coat, you can do so using cold water and a gentle laundry detergent. Begin the hand washing process by filling a basin with cold water. Make sure that your water is cold and not warm or hot. Once your basin is full, add a small amount of gentle laundry detergent and completely submerge your coat. Use a gentle swishing motion to ensure that your full coat is being penetrated by the laundry detergent. Then, leave it to sit for at least 15 minutes. Once you are satisfied that your pea coat has been adequately washed, rinse it with fresh cold water, making sure that all of the detergent has been removed. After rinsing your coat do not ring it out. Instead, gently squeeze each section of your coat to remove as much excess water as possible. 

Photo by Kindel Media from Pexels

Dry

Regardless of whether you are using a washing machine or hand washing your pea coat, avoid using a tumble dryer. Using a tumble dryer can damage the delicate wool fibres of your pea coat. Instead, lay your coat flat on a clean, dry, towel, on a completely flat surface. You may be tempted to hang your coat up to dry, but this will cause your coat to sag and become misshapen. Laying it on a flat surface ensures that it keeps its shape and the fibres aren’t damaged. It can take a few days for your coat to completely dry, however, it is worth it to ensure that your pea coat stays in the best condition possible. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

If you are worried about washing your pea coat, we’re here to help. Book your coat in for a Laundryheap dry clean by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Puffer jacket care guide

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

As we adjust to the changing autumn weather, it’s time to dig out and brush off our jackets. The best way to ensure that your jacket lasts the whole autumn and winter season is to properly care for it. This is your puffer jacket care guide. 

  • Be aware of sharp objects 
  • Pre wash 
  • Machine wash
  • Hand wash
  • Dry on a low heat
  • Air dry
  • Store

Be aware of sharp objects 

Puffer jackets, as the name suggests, have a quilted design made from pockets of insulation that make the sections between the stitching puffy. This insulation makes puffer jackets incredibly warm, but also vulnerable to snags and tears. When wearing your jacket, be mindful of sharp objects that you may come in to contact with. If you do accidentally tear your puffer jacket, re-stuff the area if any insulation has escaped, before using a needle and thread to mend the hole. Make sure that all snags and tears have been mended before you wash your jacket. 

Photo by Yan Krukov from Pexels

Pre wash

Before you wash your puffer jacket it is important to empty all of the pockets and zip up the zipper. This will firstly ensure that you don’t accidentally wash something valuable, and also prevent any unwanted materials, such as tissues, from becoming stuck to your jacket during the washing process. For extra protection, lubricate the zipper with gel to prevent it from rusting and becoming difficult to use. It is also advisable to turn your puffer jacket inside out to avoid the delicate puffy pockets from being snagged and torn during washing.

Photo by Michael Burrows from Pexels

Machine wash

You should never wash your puffer jacket more than twice a year because detergents and washing machines can wear down its water protective shell. If you are using a washing machine to clean your puffer jacket it is best to use a top-loading machine as they don’t have a centre agitator that can catch and tear your jacket. 

The optimum washing machine cycle to use is a gentle cycle. This will limit the amount of times your jacket is spun in the machine, therefore reducing the possibility of your jacket being damaged. 

In terms of laundry detergent, a natural detergent or delicate fabric specific detergent is advised. Using a strong detergent will damage the filler that makes your puffer jacket puffy, resulting in your jacket deflating and becoming less insulating. 

Photo by Boris Pavlikovsky from Pexels

Hand wash

If you are concerned about damaging your puffer jacket in the washing machine, you can hand wash it instead. To hand wash your jacket, first fill a sink or bath with cold water, enough to submerge your jacket in. Next, add a teaspoon of delicate or natural detergent. Finally, submerge your jacket completely in the water, using gentle scrubbing motions to clean each section of your jacket. 

Once you are satisfied that your jacket has been adequately cleaned, rinse it with fresh cold water to ensure that all of the detergent has been removed. Next, lightly squeeze each section of your jacket to remove as much water as possible. Make sure that you are squeezing and not wringing your jacket as this could cause tears. 

Photo by Sinitta Leunen from Pexels

Dry on a low heat 

Despite the delicate fabric your puffer jacket is made from, it is recommended that you tumble dry your jacket. Use a low heat setting and allow your dryer to run until your jacket is completely dry. To ensure that your jacket remains puffy, add 2 tennis balls to your tumble dryer. The movement of the tennis balls in the dryer will redistribute the insulation in your jacket, ensuring that it stays puffy. Although tempting, do not use a high heat setting on your tumble dryer as this can melt the delicate outer shell of your jacket. 

Photo by Viacheslav Stopkevich from Pexels

Air dry 

If you do not have access to a tumble dryer, or you would prefer not to use one, you can air dry your puffer jacket. To air dry your jacket lay it completely flat on a clean dry towel, away from direct sunlight. Leave your jacket to completely dry, before using your hands to redistribute the insulation in your jacket, making it puffy and full bodied. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Store

Most puffer jackets come with handy bags that your jacket can be folded into. Although handy short-term, these bags should not be used to store your jacket for more than a handful of hours. Folding your puffer jacket into a small shape can damage the insulation in your jacket, causing it to be ineffective. Instead, hang your puffer jacket up on a coat hanger in a dry area after every wear. This will ensure that the jackets insulation remains well distributed throughout the pockets, and, if wet, your jacket can completely dry

Photo by Roman Pohorecki from Pexels

The best way to ensure that your puffer jacket lasts throughout the autumn and winter months is to have Laundryheap take care of it for you. To book your Laundryheap order simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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DIY Halloween costumes

Photo by Charles Parker from Pexels

Halloween is almost upon us and if you haven’t got your outfit sorted don’t panic. These 4 DIY costumes are easy to make and perfect for a Halloween full of thrills and chills. 

  • Ghost
  • Skeleton
  • Strawberry
  • Zombie bride

Ghost

Let’s start easy. A ghost costume is incredibly easy to achieve, very comfortable, and requires limited supplies. 

To make a ghost costume you will need…
  • A white sheet
  • Scissors 
  • Light coloured hat
  • Pen or pencil
  • Safety pins 
  • Black marker 

To begin making your ghost costume place your light coloured hat on your head. If your hat has a brim you must either cut it off or wear your hat backwards so that it doesn’t get in the way. 

Next, drape your white sheet over your head so that it’s laying evenly over your body. If your sheet is slightly too long, get a friend to use a pen to mark the excess fabric to a comfortable length. Whilst you are still wearing the sheet, get your friend to mark where the top of your head is, and use your fingers to demonstrate where your eyes are, marking them as well. 

Once the appropriate areas have been marked, take your sheet off. Use one safety pin to attach your hat to your sheet using the mark in the centre of the head. Use your remaining safety pins to make sure that the hat is secured to the sheet. 

With your scissors cut eye holes where they were marked. Once you have cut your eye holes, use your black marker to draw around them, making them more defined. You can also use your black maker to draw a nose and mouth if you wish. 

Finally, use your scissors to cut the excess fabric at the bottom of the sheet. For a more ghoulishly looking ghost, cut your fabric in a haphazard manner rather than in a straight line. You are now ready to put your costume on and enjoy a day of tricks and lots of treats. 

Photo by Charles Parker from Pexels

Skeleton 

If you are looking for a costume with a bit more body to it, why not go as a skeleton? 

To make a skeleton costume you will need… 
  • White masking tape 
  • Black clothing to cover your top and bottom half

To begin making your skeleton costume lay out your black clothing on a flat surface. Make sure that your clothes are adequately spread out so that you can see the whole garment. 

Create your skeleton by tearing off strips of masking tape of various lengths and sticking them to your black clothes. Your skeleton doesn’t have to be accurate, so don’t worry too much about getting the lengths and placement of the tape right. Make sure that you have covered the general areas, such as your arms, legs, and torso, before putting your costume on. 

To add to your slinky skeleton look you can paint your face to look like a skeleton using black and white face paint. Alternatively, you can print out a mask of a skeleton for an equally frightening look. 

Photo by Mike Jones from Pexels

Strawberry

Halloween costumes don’t always have to be scary. Go as something sweeter, and easy to make, like a strawberry

To make a strawberry costume you will need… 
  • Red clothing, ideally a dress
  • White felt
  • Long cylinder can (a crisp can will do)
  • Green cardboard
  • Pencil
  • A stretchy headband
  • Scissors 
  • Hot glue gun 

To begin making your strawberry costume, use your scissors to cut out lots of small teardrop shapes from your white felt. To make this step faster, layer 2 or 3 sheets of felt and cut through them at the same time. These teardrop shapes will be the seeds of your strawberry. 

Once you have finished cutting out your shapes, lay out your red clothing on a flat surface, making sure that you can see the whole garment. Using a hot glue gun, glue your felt shapes to your red clothing in a random pattern, making sure that your whole garment is covered. Once you have glued your white felt down, set your red clothing to one side to dry. 

Whilst your clothing is drying, you can make your leafy headpiece. To begin creating your headpiece use a pencil to trace the shape of 2 different sized leaves on your green cardboard. Ideally you want 4 large leaves and 5 or 6 slightly smaller leaves. Once you have drawn all of your leaves, use your scissors to cut them out. To make your strawberry leaves look more realistic, use your fingers to gently pinch the base of each leaf and slide your fingers up to the tip. This will create a gentle curl. 

Your can will be the base of your hat, so make sure that it is a comfortable height to place on your head. Use your glue gun to glue the biggest leaves around the can. Next, use the second biggest leaves to fill in the gaps in between the big leaves, making sure that you can no longer see the can. To finish off your headpiece, stick your headband to your can by making a line of hot glue at the base of your can.

Once your headband is secured you can shimmy your strawberry outfit on, and top it off with your leafy headpiece for more of a treat than a trick. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Zombie bride

We’ve all heard of bridezilla, well this costume is bridezilla if she were dead. Luckily, this outfit is a lot easier to put together than a wedding, so hopefully there won’t be any meltdowns. 

To make a zombie bride costume you will need… 
  • A white dress 
  • White veil (not essential but a nice touch)
  • Moisturiser
  • Light shade of foundation
  • White powder
  • Light blue eyeshadow
  • Smokey eye eyeshadow palette
  • Black pencil eyeliner
  • Black mascara

A zombie bride look is less about the outfit and more about the makeup. That being said, to achieve the bridal look you will need a white dress and a veil. To make your zombie look really come to life, cover your dress in black makeup or any product that will make it look dirty. You may also want to tear the bottom of your dress to zombiefy it. 

To make your zombie bride come alive, begin by smoothing moisturiser into your face. Add the lightest shade of foundation that you can find on top of your moisturiser, blending it in until smooth. Once smooth, add white powder to your face, giving yourself a very pale complexion. To add to the undead look, blend a light blue eyeshadow into your makeup, giving your skin a blueish grey tone.  

Next, use a smokey eye eyeshadow palette to add colour to your eyes, cheeks, and forehead. Use a combination of purple, pink, red, and black eyeshadow underneath your eyes to make dark circles, making sure to blend the colours together with a brush. Use a black eyeshadow to highlight your cheekbones and wrinkles on your forehead, blending the lines slightly to give you a more dead-like look. 

With a black pencil eyeliner, heavily line the lids of your eyes, using your fingers to smudge the eyeliner into your skin. For added effect, use the eyeliner on your lashline, smudging that as well. This will create the effect of sunken eyes.  

Finally, finish the look by applying a heavy amount of mascara to your bottom lashes. Use your mascara brush to clump some of your lashes together, in a messy, haphazard way. 

With your dress on and makeup done, you are ready to head out into the world to find your groom… dead or alive. 

Photo by A Koolshooter from Pexels

At Laundryheap there are no tricks, only treats. Whilst you have fun creating mischief on Halloween, we will pick-up, launder, and redeliver your clothing to you. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your order today.


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Trench coat care guide

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

As we adjust to the changing autumn weather, it’s time to dig out and brush off our coats. The best way to ensure that your coat lasts the whole autumn and winter season is to properly care for it. This is your trench coat care guide

  • Always check the care label 
  • Spot clean
  • Pretreat
  • Machine wash 
  • Dry
  • Keep fresh
  • Store

Always check the care label

As with any item of clothing, before you begin caring for your trench coat you must check the care label. Checking your coats care label will inform you of what fabrics your coat is made from, whether it is safe to machine wash, what temperature you should be washing it at, and whether it is tumble dryer safe. All of this information will help you to care for your trench coat in the appropriate manner. 

Spot clean

Per season you should only be washing your coat 2-3 times. If your trench has a handful of stains, don’t immediately wash it, try and spot clean. To spot clean your trench coat dampen a soft, clean, cloth with diluted vinegar, and gently dab at each stain until it lifts. Avoid rubbing or wiping motions as this can set the stain further into your coat rather than lifting it. You should notice your stains lifting after a handful of dabs, leaving your trench coat clean and ready to wear. 

Photo by Tony Schnagl from Pexels

Pre-treat 

If you have decided that it’s time to wash your trench coat, make sure that you pre-treat any stains before putting it in the washing machine. To pre-treat your stains make a paste from equal parts vinegar and baking soda. Rub this paste into your stains using your fingers, or a soft-bristled brush, and leave it to soak for a minimum of 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, rinse the paste off with lukewarm water. If your stains persist, add two tablespoons of vinegar and two tablespoons of laundry detergent to a bucket of water and leave your trench coat to soak overnight. The mixture will penetrate the stains, lifting them and leaving your trench coat ready for the washing machine. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Machine wash

Even if your trench coat is safe to wash in the washing machine it’s best to take precautions. Before putting your coat in the washing machine turn it inside out and place it in a mesh laundry bag. This will help protect any buttons, zips, and fastenings your trench coat has. Wash your coat on a normal, warm water, cycle, using a gentle laundry detergent. Avoid washing your coat with any other items. 

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Dry

Once your trench coat has been washed, remove it immediately from the washing machine to limit creasing. You should avoid using your tumble dryer, or any other form of heating, to dry your trench coat, instead opting to air dry. Hang your trench coat on a wooden hanger, making sure that it is sitting on the hanger properly to avoid any stretching, and leave it to air dry in an airy open space. It may take a while for your coat to dry completely, but air drying is the best way to ensure that your coat maintains its shape and is not damaged by heat. 

Photo by Ron Lach from Pexels

Keep fresh

To keep your coat healthy it’s important to freshen it up in between washes. If you own a steam cleaner steaming your trench coat a handful of times between washes will help kill bacteria and remove any creases in your coat. To lift odours, you can spray your trench coat with fabric spray, which is perfect for not only removing smells but giving your coat a quick refresher. The final way to keep your coat looking fresh is by regularly brushing it. Gently run a soft-bristled brush over your coat in between wears to lift lint, hair, and fluff. This will ensure that your coat stays looking pristine and ready to wear at all times. 

Photo by Abdulrhman Elkady from Pexels

Store 

During the autumn and winter months make sure that you hang your trench coat up using a clothes hanger, never on a coat peg. Hanging your trench on a clothes hanger will ensure that it maintains its shape and will not stretch. You may also want to avoid hanging your trench in direct sunlight as this can sometimes make the colour fade. 

When the autumn and winter is over, wash your trench coat one last time, making sure that your pockets are empty, fold it, and store it in a cotton storage bin. This will help keep it fresh and mould free until you need it again next year. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

If you are concerned about washing your trench coat, or your coat is dry clean only, we’re here to help. Book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.