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Reduce, reuse, recycle whilst doing laundry 

Photo by Sarah Chai from Pexels

One of the most effective ways to lower our carbon footprint is to reduce, reuse, and recycle the items we use. That includes when we do our laundry

  • Reduce the amount of laundry you do
  • Reduce the temperature you wash at 
  • Reuse detergent bottles 
  • Reuse dryer balls and sheets
  • Recycle containers 
  • Recycle your clothing
  • How Laundryheap is doing their bit 

Reduce the amount of laundry you do

On average a washing machine uses 350 to 500 watts of electricity per hour. The average person does two loads of laundry per week, which translates to 36,400 to 52,000 watts of electricity in just one year. By reducing the amount of laundry you do you could half your yearly electricity usage. There are several ways to reduce your laundry load, including waiting until you have a full laundry basket, spot treating stains, and freezing your jeans.

Photo by Sarah Chai from Pexels

Reduce the temperature you wash at

Washing your laundry at 60 degrees will kill bacteria, but use 40% more energy than washing at 30 degrees. You may have noticed when shopping for laundry detergent that many brands now make cold wash detergents. These are detergents that work just as effectively at 30 degrees as they do at hotter temperatures, meaning that you can reduce the temperature you wash at without affecting the cleanliness of your laundry. Be aware that if you are laundering items that are stained it is best to pre-treat them before washing at 30 degrees. 

Photo by Amina Filkins from Pexels

Reuse detergent bottles

Once you have used your laundry detergent, don’t throw your bottles away, reuse them. There are a multitude of ways that you can reuse detergent bottles, including making a watering can, a bird feeder, or weights. You can even use your empty detergent bottle to store homemade laundry detergent. Just remember that before you reuse your detergent bottles you need to make sure that they are fully rinsed out. 

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

Reuse dryer balls and sheets

Dryer balls and sheets are used to reduce the drying time of your laundry, meaning that you use less energy per load. Rather than using one-use dryer balls and sheets, invest in reusable options. They may be slightly more expensive, but will save you money in the long run. To be even more environmentally conscious you can make your own dryer balls using tin foil or old clothing. 

Image by mjtmail (tiggy)

Recycle containers

If you don’t want to reuse your detergent bottles, make sure that you recycle them as well as your other laundry containers. Most laundry containers are made from cardboard or plastic, both of which can be recycled. Make sure that you adequately rinse and/or empty your containers before recycling them, ensuring that there is no residue left in the bottom. 

Photo by SHVETS production from Pexels

Recycle your clothing 

It’s not just laundry containers that can be recycled, you can also recycle your clothing. If you notice that you have clothing that you don’t wear often, donate them to a local charity. This will ensure that your clothing gets rehomed rather than being added to the 92 million tons of textile waste created each year. Alternatively, if your clothing is becoming worn or ripped, you could create something new from your scraps. Whether you are an avid sewer and can create a new garment, or you simply use your ripped clothing as a cleaning rag, you can give even the most worn down piece of clothing a new life. 

Photo by Julia M Cameron from Pexels

How Laundryheap is doing their bit

At Laundryheap we are dedicated to improving the way we work to be more environmentally friendly. For example, we offer our customers the option of an eco friendly route. This means that our drivers are given a wider time slot to collect and redeliver customers laundry so that orders can be grouped together and we can use less fuel. As well as our eco routes, Laundryheap also uses e-bikes in certain areas to reduce the carbon emissions emitted whilst picking up and delivering laundry.

To book your Laundryheap service simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.

Photo by Julia M Cameron from Pexels


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Clothing to avoid wearing to the beach

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

A day at the beach is the ultimate way to relax. Lying back on the golden sand, cooling off in the glittering sea, staying refreshed with a delicious ice cream. Before heading to the beach, make sure that you are wearing the right clothing for ultimate relaxation by avoiding these items. 

  • Jeans
  • Dark colours 
  • Tight clothes
  • Expensive jewellery 
  • Shoes

Jeans

Jeans, along with any heavy clothing, should be avoided at all costs when heading to the beach. As a material, jeans are too stiff and heavy to possibly be comfortable to relax on the sand in. Wearing them will only result in your legs becoming unbearably sweaty. As well as this, you want to wear something to and from the beach that is easy to remove and put back on, not a pair of jeans that will only stick to you if you aren’t completely dry from your recent dip in the ocean. 

Photo by Mica Asato from Pexels

Dark colours

As a rule of thumb, avoid all dark colours when heading to the beach. Dark colours absorb more heat than their lighter alternatives, making your body temperature rise rather than trying to cool it down. When you are on the beach, exposed to the sun for long periods of time, it’s best to opt for white or lighter colours as these reflect the sun.

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Tight clothes

A day at the beach should be relaxing and comfortable, something that won’t be achieved if you are wearing tight clothing. Even if you aren’t on the beach, tight clothing should be avoided when it is warm as the material clings to your body and raises your temperature. Instead, opt for light, breathable materials, such as cotton and linen, that are looser on the body and will aid in regulating your body temperature. 

Photo by Artem Beliaikin from Pexels

Expensive jewellery 

A dip in the sea is the perfect way to cool off from lying on the hot sand all day. Unfortunately, the salt from the water can erode gold, silver, or platinum jewellery, causing irreversible damage. Before going for a swim make sure to remove ALL of your jewellery if it is particularly sentimental. Alternatively, leave your jewellery at home so there is absolutely no risk of it being damaged or stolen whilst you are swimming. 

Photo by Leah Kelley from Pexels

Shoes

Sand is a natural exfoliator and will lift dead skin cells and smooth the soles of your feet. It is also incredibly irritating and will find its way into any small gap possible. When heading to the beach, always opt to wear flip flops or sandals rather than shoes. If you wear shoes you will be trying to get sand out of and off of them for days, maybe even weeks, after you leave the beach. If you wear sandals, you can easily shake the sand from them once your day is done. 

Photo by Nathan J Hilton from Pexels

Whilst you’re having fun in the sun, let us take care of your laundry. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Laundry essentials for freshers

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Going to university is exciting. For many, it marks the beginning of adult life. You are living on your own, maybe for the first time, potentially in a brand new town, city, or even country. But, amongst the excitement and fun, don’t forget about your laundry.

  • Laundry basket
  • Laundry detergent 
  • Fabric softener
  • Dryer ball/sheets
  • Colour catching sheets
  • Stain remover
  • Laundry bag 
  • Collapsable drying rack 
  • Change
  • Laundryheap

Laundry basket

A laundry basket is a basic essential. It will help you to transport your laundry from your room to the laundromat, to the washing machine, to the dryer, and back to your room. There are many different types of laundry baskets so you will definitely be able to find one within your budget. A pro freshers tip is to buy a collapsible laundry basket. It is unlikely that you will be inundated with space in your room, so a collapsible basket will help you save space. 

Image by Santeri Viinamäki

Laundry detergent

You can’t do your laundry without laundry detergent. You can choose between powder, liquid, and pods, with your cheapest option being powder. When you are shopping for your laundry detergent, consider buying an antibacterial detergent. 90% of freshers get freshers-flu within their first term at university, and antibacterial laundry detergent will ensure that your clothing is both clean and disinfected. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Fabric softener 

Fabric softener will maintain the softness of your clothing and make your garments smell amazing. If you have sensitive skin, fabric softener can help with irritation as it smooths the fibres in your clothing, making them less abrasive against your skin. Simply add a capful of fabric softener to every load of your laundry and your clothes will smell and feel divine for weeks. 

Photo by George Milton from Pexels

Dryer balls/sheets

Investing in dryer balls/sheets could save you a small fortune. Dryer balls and sheets can be added to your tumble dryer to reduce drying time and limit the static on your clothing. Simply add 2-3 balls or sheets to each load and your drying time will be cut by at least 10%. This may not seem like a huge amount of time, but when you are paying to use a dryer per minute/hour, 10% could end up saving you a lot of money.

Image by trenttsd

Colour catching sheets

To maintain the colour and quality of your clothing it’s always best to wash your colours and whites separately. That being said, when you are a student, paying to use a washing machine per load, exceptions can be made. Buy yourself a box of colour catching sheets and save yourself the hassle of separating your laundry and paying to use the washing machine twice. These sheets will catch any colour runs, and prevent your whites from turning grey. 

Photo by Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels

Stain remover 

Whether you are a fresher or not, stain remover is always useful to have in your cupboard. Stain remover is great for pre-treating tough stains or adding to your washing machine to lift smaller, fresher, stains. If you do stain your clothing and don’t have any stain remover, you can use alternatives such as lemon juice and baking soda. 

Image by ajay_suresh

Laundry bag

When you do your laundry you may notice that your socks go into the machine in a pair, but come out single. Do not risk losing your socks and instead buy a laundry bag. These small bags are the perfect size for washing your socks and will guarantee that you never lose one again. Laundry bags are also incredibly useful when washing delicate underwear. 

Photo by Susanne Jutzeler from Pexels

Collapsible drying rack 

It is not guaranteed that your laundromat will have tumble dryers, and you may also not want to pay to use one. If either of these scenarios is the case, you may want to invest in a collapsible drying rack. These racks are perfect for hanging your clothes on in the comfort of your own room. Simply fold it out, hang your clothes, and leave them for a day or two to dry. Once your clothes are dry, simply fold your rack away and store it somewhere safe. It may take slightly longer for your clothing to dry this way, but you will save yourself money and your drying rack will not take up unnecessary space. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Change

When using a laundromat it is essential that you have change with you. Some laundromats do accept card payments, however, it is not always guaranteed. Stay prepared by always taking a small amount of change with you when you go to the laundromat. That way, regardless of whether your laundromat accepts cards or not, you are guaranteed to have clean laundry at the end of the day. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Laundryheap

Nobody enjoys doing laundry, and you shouldn’t let the chore take away from your fresher’s experience. If you live in student accommodation and want a helping hand with your laundry, head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to make your booking today. Use the code STDNT7 for 7% off of your first order.

Enjoy your freshers!


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How to tie a Windsor knot

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Whether you’re getting set for a wedding, work, or going back to school, it’s important to know how to properly tie a tie. Follow these simple steps, and you will be tying your tie in no time. 

  • Half Windsor
  • Full Windsor

Half Windsor 

The half Windsor knot is the most popular form of knot. It is a medium-sized knot that is easy to reproduce, and perfect for medium to thick ties

  1. Begin by popping the collar of your shirt, and draping your tie around your neck so that it sits below the collar. The wide end of your tie should be on your right-hand side and reach your thigh, and the smaller end on your left and reaching your rib cage. 
  2. Create an X with the two ends of your tie by crossing the wide end over the thin end. From here, loop the wide end horizontally around and behind the thin end of your tie. This should maintain the X shape. 
  3. Next, take the wide end of your tie from the top and through the opening of the X. Make sure to pull it tight. This will create the initial knot
  4. Wrap the wide end of your tie in front of the thin end from your right to your left. Then, bring the wide end towards your chest and behind the knot, forming a loop in front of your knot. 
  5. Pull the wide end of your tie through the loop you have created, making sure that you have pulled the full length of it through. 
  6. Finally, adjust your tie by pulling the knot towards the collar of your shirt whilst simultaneously pulling the thin end at the back of your tie down. Adjust your collar so that it is sitting flush with your shoulders before making improvements to your tie. Make sure that your knot is sitting at the top of your shirt, and that your tie is straight and even. 
Image by Steam Pipe Trunk Distributio

Full Windsor

The full Windsor knot is perfect for wider collared shirts. The process involves wrapping your tie twice, so a longer tie is needed for the process. 

  1. Begin by popping the collar of your shirt, and draping your tie around your neck so that it sits below the collar. Adjust your tie so that the wide end is sitting approximately 4-6 inches lower than your waistband
  2. Create an X with the two ends of your tie by crossing the wide end over the thin end. From here, tuck the wide end up and beneath the loop around your neck. It should come out and point-upwards behind the X. 
  3. Pull the wide end all the way down, before passing it behind the knot and horizontally from right to left. 
  4. Take the wide end tip, and flip it upwards, tugging it diagonally across the front of the knot. Next, loop the wide end over the top of the loop around your collar and down. It should come out on the left of the thin end. 
  5. From your left position, bring the wide end of your tie over the front of your knot to form a band. Bring the wide end of your tie underneath the loop, around the collar, and down, sliding it through the band. 
  6. Adjust your collar so that it is sitting flush with your shirt, and pull the wide end of your tie downwards until it meets the top of your shirt.
Image by Urkel-os

Keep your tie, along with the rest of your suit, looking sharp with Laundryheap. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your dry cleaning order today.


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Pre-treatment alternatives

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

The best way to remove stains is to pre-treat them. If you don’t have any pre-treatment products, pre-treat your stains with these alternatives. 

  • Baking soda
  • Lemon/lime
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Corn starch 
  • Salt
  • Dish soap
  • Laundry detergent 

Baking soda

Baking soda is particularly useful at pre-treating odorous wet stains, such as coffee. The powdery consistency sucks up the wetness of the stain, whilst absorbing the odour, leaving your clothing with an odourless and smaller stain. Make sure to always brush off the baking soda before washing your garment. Alternatively, you can make a baking soda paste by mixing two parts baking soda with one part water. Spreading the paste over your stain will help to loosen it from the fibres of your clothing

Photo by Kaboompics .com from Pexels

Lemon/lime

The natural acidity in lemon and lime acts as a natural bleaching agent. Squeezing lemon or lime juice directly over the stain will begin bleaching it, making the stain lighter and easier to remove in the wash. Be warned that using lemon or lime juice on coloured clothing may cause discolouration, so use with caution or only on white clothing. It is particularly effective on yellow underarm and rust stains

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Hydrogen peroxide

Similarly to lemon and lime, hydrogen peroxide is a natural bleaching agent. Simply pour or spray a small amount of the solution on to your stain, and allow it to sit for 10 minutes. The hydrogen peroxide will begin to break down and lift your stain, making it easier for it to be completely lifted in the wash. After 10 minutes, wash your garment as you usually would, and observe as your clothing becomes completely stain-free. 

Image by Duncan Creamer

Corn starch

If you have an oily or greasy stain, immediately sprinkle corn starch over it. Make sure that your stain is completely covered by the corn starch, and leave it to sit for at least 10 minutes. The small particles that make up the corn starch will begin absorbing the stain, lifting it from your garment. If you catch your stain quick enough, the corn starch alone may be enough to lift your stain completely. If not, wash your item as you usually would. 

Image by JaBB

Salt 

Salt works in a similar way to corn starch, particularly on red wine stains. The particles that make up the salt absorb the stain, leaving a smaller and more manageable stain behind. Sprinkle your red wine stain with a liberal amount of salt, the cheaper the better, and leave it to sit for at least 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, brush the salt from your garment and observe whether your stain has reduced in size and become lighter. If not, you may want to apply more salt and leave it for longer. 

Photo by Castorly Stock from Pexels

Dish soap 

Dish soap is manufactured to tackle greasy and oily substances. To remove stains using dish soap, squirt a small amount directly onto the stain, and use your fingers, or a soft-bristled brush, to rub it in. Leave it to sit for 10 minutes, before rinsing it from your stain, and washing as you usually would. 

Photo by Vivaan Rupani from Pexels

Laundry detergent 

Laundry detergent is specially formulated to lift dirt from clothing, which makes it a great pre-treatment. You can use laundry detergent in the same way as you would use dish soap. Rub a small amount directly onto your stain, leave it to sit for 10 minutes, and then rinse it from your garment. It’s best, and easiest, to use liquid laundry detergent. Alternatively, you can make a paste from powdered laundry detergent and water which you can spread directly onto your stain. 

Image by ajay_suresh

The best way to treat any stain is to let us do it for you. Book your Laundryheap order by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Top cycling routes in Amsterdam

Photo by Liam Gant from Pexels

There are 881,000 bikes in Amsterdam– more bikes than residents. Cycling is a great way to see the city, and these are the top 5 routes we recommend taking. 

  • Amstel River
  • Zuidoost
  • Haarlem
  • Waterland
  • Flowers of Amsterdam

Amstel River

The Amstel River, named after the 13th century fishing village Amstelredamme,  stretches for 31 kilometres. Cycling down the Amstel River will take you out of Amsterdam and through Ouderkerk aan de Amstel, Nes aan de Amstel, Uithoorn and Waver. Whilst you cycle, look out for the Riekermolen windmill. Built in 1636, it was used to drain the surrounding land, but now stands as a beautiful reminder of a bygone era. You will also pass Rembrandt Hoeve, a farm which specialises in making traditional Netherland clogs and gouda cheese.

Image by karinmuller66 from Pixabay

Zuidoost

When you think of Amsterdam, you picture canals, clogs, and tulips. Cycling through Zuidoost will give you the opportunity to experience a different side to the city. Amsterdam-Zuidoost and Bijlmermeer, simply known as Bijlmer, is home to 100,000 residents of more than 150 ethnic backgrounds, who have created a neighbourhood overflowing with art, culture, and entertainment. As you bike across the neighbourhood, observe the HCC building, a strikingly colourful building which is a living and working place for artists, the multitude of graffiti murals that cover walls across the neighbourhood, and the colourful houses which line the streets. If you get hungry on your travels, stop off at Foodhallen World of Food, where you will find street food from across the world- a true celebration of the different ethnicities that live and work in Bijlmer. 

Image by Henk-Jan van der Klis

Haarlem

Just outside of the urban streets of Amsterdam is the pastoral city of Haarlem. Built during the 10th century, Haarlem holds on to its medieval charm, and yet remains very modern with it’s thriving art scene. Whilst cycling through, make sure that you take a break to explore the city. Visit the Teylers Museum, home to fossils and minerals, as well as a collection of drawings and paintings. Grote Markt is the market square of Haarlem where you can buy a multitude of Netherland delicacies from vendors. Whilst in Grote Markt, don’t miss out on viewing Haarlem City Hall, one of the oldest City Hall’s in the Netherlands. 

Image by Bogdan Migulski

Waterland

The Waterland cycling route begins and ends at Amsterdam Centraal, Amsterdam’s largest train station. This is the perfect cycle route to take to see the traditional villages surrounding Amsterdam, and fall in love with the Netherlands countryside. As you cycle, you will pass a 16th century wooden house on the Buiksloterdijk, giving you a true sense of how the Netherlands was thousands of years ago. Another highlight of the route is the Krijtmolen d’Admiraal, an octagonal smock windmill built in 1792. This cycle route has beautiful landmarks to observe, whilst being incredibly peaceful. Perfect for a Sunday afternoon.

Image by Marcelmulder68

Flowers of Amsterdam

There can only be one flower you think of when you think about the Netherlands- tulips. In 1637, tulips were being sold for more than the price of a luxury Amsterdam home. The flower cycle route begins at the Bloemenmarkt, the world’s only floating flower market, and ends in Aalsmeer, near the largest flower auction in the world where 12 million flowers are sold every day. Along the way, you will have the opportunity to view some of the most beautiful flowers and plants of all time. It will truly be the most scenic bike ride of your life. 

Image by Ricardo Ramírez Gisbert

Whichever cycle route you choose to take, there is no doubt that you will be exhausted after it. Too exhausted to tackle your laundry. Luckily, we’re here to help. Book your Laundryheap order today and we will have your clothing picked up, laundered, and redelivered to you before you even have time to recover from your bike ride. We’ll even wash your biking gear for you. To book your Laundryheap order simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app.


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How to remove beetroot stains

Image by Nick Collins from Pixabay

Beetroot is both delicious and it’s vibrant purple colour brightens up any dish. That being said, it is a natural, and permanent, dye, which makes beetroot stains on clothing lethal. Catch your stain early, and follow these steps, to ensure that your stain is lifted and your clothing isn’t dyed forever. 

  • Machine washable clothing 
  • Dry clean only clothing
  • Laundryheap

Machine washable clothing 

To remove beetroot stains from machine washable clothing you will need…
  • Kitchen towel
  • Cold water
  • Laundry detergent 
  • Washing machine 
  • Chlorine bleach or colour-safe bleach (optional)

To begin removing your beetroot stain, soak a kitchen towel in cold water and gently blot at the stain. Make sure that you are blotting and not rubbing the stain as rubbing will only set the beetroot further into your garment. As you blot, you should notice the stain transferring to your kitchen cloth. Continue blotting until you are satisfied that no more of the stain will be lifted. 

Once you are finished blotting, place your stain under a cold running tap. The water should turn a light purple colour as a result of it pushing more of the beetroot from your clothing. Continue holding your garment under the water until it runs clear. 

After dabbing and holding it under cold water your stain may be lifted. If it has not, gently work a small amount of laundry detergent into the area, and leave it to sit for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, rinse the laundry detergent from your garment, gently rubbing your stain with your fingers to encourage it to lift with the detergent. Continue rinsing until all of the detergent has been removed. 

Once you have removed the detergent from your garment, check to see if your stain has lightened in colour or been lifted. If it has, wash your garment in your washing machine as you usually would. If your stain is still vibrant and visible, repeat the previous steps. 

An alternative solution to lift your stain is to soak your item in chlorine or a colour safe bleach. Submerge your garment in a mixture of bleach and cold water for a minimum of 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, remove your item from the bleach solution and wash as you usually would.

Photo by Eva Elijas from Pexels

Dry clean only clothing 

To remove beetroot stains from dry clean only clothing you will need…
  • Dry cloth 
  • Damp sponge 
  • Bread (optional)

Begin lifting your beetroot stain by blotting it with a clean dry cloth. Similarly to with machine washable clothing, you must make sure that you are blotting not rubbing the stain. This will help to soak up any excess beetroot liquid and begin lifting the stain. Continue to dab until no more colour is transferred to the cloth. 

Next, dampen a clean sponge with cold water, and place it directly over the stain, making sure that it covers the full area. Do not rub or move the sponge as this can cause the beetroot to set further into the fibres of your garment. The sponge will begin absorbing the beetroot from your clothing, lifting it from your item and on to the sponge. After 5 minutes, check how much of your stain has been absorbed, and, if necessary, re-dampen the sponge and place it back on your stain for a further 5 minutes. Repeat this process until your stain has been lifted. 

If you do not have a clean sponge on hand, an alternative option is to use bread. In the same way as you would use the sponge, dampen the bread using cold water and place it over the stain. The bread will absorb the beetroot from your garment, lifting the stain. 

Once you have used either a sponge or bread to lift your beetroot stain, take a clean, dry, cloth and dab at any remnants of the stain. This should leave you with stain-free clothing

Image by Marco Verch Professional P

Laundryheap 

If you are struggling to lift your beetroot stain, or any other stain for that matter, let us take care of it for you. All you have to do is left us know what the stain is and where it is located, and we will do the rest. To book your Laundryheap order head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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The 5 stains of an afternoon tea

Photo by Sebastian Coman Photography from Pexels

There is nothing quite as satisfying, and delicious, as an afternoon tea. A smorgasbord of finger sandwiches, patisserie, scones, and, to top it all off, a glorious cup of tea. If you are enjoying your afternoon tea so much that you manage to spill some down yourself, don’t panic, follow these steps, and your clothing will be good as new. 

  • Tea
  • Clotted cream 
  • Mayonnaise
  • Cream cheese
  • Custard

Tea

You can’t have an afternoon tea without tea- it’s quite literally in the name. If your tea manages to escape your cup and dribble on your clothing, lift the stain following these simple steps. 

To remove a fresh tea stain you will need… 
  • Warm water
  • Laundry detergent 
  • Washing machine

If you catch your tea stain immediately, begin by flushing as much of it from your clothing as possible with warm water. Gently pour the warm water over the stain so that it runs through your garment, and continue this for at least 15 seconds. 

Once you are satisfied that you have flushed out as much of the tea as possible, rub a few drops of laundry detergent onto your stain until it lathers. Make sure that you target both sides of the stain in order for it to be successfully lifted. 

After your stained item has become well lathered on both sides, rinse the detergent using warm water. Continue to rinse until all of the detergent has been removed from your item. 

Finally, put your stained garment into the washing machine, and wash as you usually would. Once your cycle has finished, your stain should be completely removed.

If your tea stain remains, it may have already set into the fibers of your clothing. If this is the case, an alternative method must be used. 

To remove an old tea stain you will need… 
  • White vinegar
  • Laundry powder
  • Lukewarm water
  • Washing machine

The best way to remove an old tea stain is by making a paste from equal parts white vinegar, laundry powder, and lukewarm water. For the most effective paste use two tablespoons of each ingredient. 

Rub you paste directly onto your stain using your fingers. Alternatively, you can use a soft-bristled brush or clean white cloth. Using your chosen tool, work your paste into your stain until it has been completely covered. 

Once you are satisfied that your paste has been worked into your stain, rinse your garment with lukewarm water until all of the paste has been removed. If you notice a tea stain still on your garment, work more paste into the stain and re-rinse. 

Wash your garment in your washing machine as you usually would. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Clotted cream

Jam and clotted cream are the perfect accompaniment to a freshly baked scone. The only question is, do you put the jam or the cream on first? More importantly, how do you remove a clotted cream stain if a blob makes its way onto your clothing?

To remove a clotted cream stain you will need…
  • Spoon or blunt knife
  • Coldwater
  • Liquid laundry detergent 
  • Washing machine 

The most important thing to remember with any cream stain is to tackle it as soon as possible or it will turn yellow and be much harder to remove. 

To begin removing your clotted cream stain, first remove as much of the solid cream as possible using a spoon or a blunt knife. Be careful if you are using a knife as you don’t want to push too hard and damage the fibers of your item. 

After removing as much solid cream as possible, turn your garment inside out and flush your stain with cold water. A clotted cream stain is made from protein which, if exposed to warm or hot water will curdle and set the stain deeper into your fabric. 

Once you have flushed as much of your stain as possible, pour a small amount of liquid laundry detergent directly onto the stain and work it in using your fingers. You want to use a detergent containing enzymes as these will help to break down the protein in the clotted cream. After working your detergent into your stain, soak it in cold water for a minimum of 30 minutes. If your stain is not fresh, you may want to leave it soaking for longer, potentially overnight. 

After soaking your stain, remove your garment from the water, and wash as you usually would. After washing, if you notice that your stain has not completely lifted, repeat the process and try soaking your item for longer. 

Image by Zul Vent from Pixabay

Mayonnaise 

Part of the afternoon tea experience is enjoying a selection of finger sandwiches, many of which will contain mayonnaise. It is only too easy for a blob of mayonnaise to fall from within the crusts of your sanwich and land directly on your outfit. If this is the case, follow these simple steps. 

To remove a mayonnaise stain you will need…
  • Blunt knife or spoon
  • Heavy-duty liquid laundry detergent 
  • Washing machine 

Begin removing your stain by using a blunt knife or spoon to lift as much solid mayonnaise as possible. Be careful to not push too hard on your garment or you risk causing rips and tears. 

After removing as much of your mayonnaise as possible, pre-treat your stain using heavy-duty liquid laundry detergent. You must make sure that your detergent is heavy-duty so that it can break down the oils in the stain. Use your fingers, or a soft-bristled brush, to gently rub your detergent in. Continue rubbing until you are satisfied that the detergent has been adequately rubbed into your stain. 

Allow your detergent to sit for at least 15 minutes, before washing your garment in the washing machine, using the hottest temperature on your items care label. Once your item has completed its cycle, remove it from the washing machine and check that your stain has been completely removed. If your stain remains, repeat the process. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional Photographer

Cream cheese

Aside from mayonnaise-based fillings, salmon and cream cheese is a very popular finger sandwich filling for afternoon tea. Like mayonnaise, cream cheese can also easily escape from your bread and find its way onto your clothing. 

To remove a cream cheese stain you will need…
  • Blunt knife or spoon
  • Heavy-duty liquid laundry detergent
  • Washing machine 

Begin removing your cream cheese stain by using a blunt knife or spoon to lift as much solid cream cheese from your clothing as possible. Do not use a cloth to rub at the cream cheese as this will only set the stain further into your item and make it harder to remove. 

After removing as much solid cream cheese as possible, work a few drops of heavy-duty liquid laundry detergent into your stain. The heavy-duty detergent contains enzymes that will break down the oils in the stain and help to lift it. After working your detergent into your stain, set your garment to one side and allow it to sit for at least 15 minutes. 

Finally, wash your item as you usually would. This is the final step in dissolving and lifting the oils and proteins that make up the stain. After washing, check that your stain has been completely lifted prior to drying. If it has not, repeat the process and try leaving your detergent to penetrate your stain for longer. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Custard 

The final component to any successful afternoon tea is a delightful selection of cakes, many of which are filled with custard. As delicious as these cakes are, when you bite into them, the custard has a nasty habit of squirting out and landing on clean clothing. 

To remove a custard stain you will need…
  • A spoon or blunt knife
  • Coldwater
  • Heavy-duty liquid laundry detergent 
  • Hot water
  • Chlorine bleach or colour safe bleach
  • Washing machine 

Begin removing your custard stain by lifting as much of it from your garment as possible using a blunt knife or spoon. Be careful when doing this as custard can be slippery and you don’t want to risk spreading the stain to other parts of your garment

Once you have removed as much of the stain as possible, turn your item inside out and flush the stain with cold water. This will help to push out as much of the custard from the fibers of your clothing as possible. 

When you are satisfied that you can not flush out any more custard with cold water, use a heavy-duty laundry detergent to pre-treat your stain. Rub the detergent into the stained area using your fingers, or a soft-bristled brush if you so wish, making sure that it is rubbed into the whole of your stain. Leave your detergent to sit for a minimum of 15 minutes to ensure that your stain has been adequately penetrated. 

Next, wash your stained item at the hottest temperature that the care label will allow, adding chlorine bleach if your item is white, or colour-safe bleach if not. The bleach will help to break down and lift any remaining stain that the detergent failed to remove. 

Once your cycle is complete, remove your item and check that the stain has been lifted. If not, repeat the process until the full stain is removed. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Afternoon tea is fun, and something that should not be spoiled by stains or the worry of having to remove them. Instead, enjoy your afternoon tea with the knowledge that we can lift your stains for you. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your order now. 


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How to dress for summer in the office

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If you’re heading back to the office this summer, make sure you have these staples in your wardrobe to help beat the heat. 

  • Linen shorts
  • Linen trousers
  • Sleeveless blazer
  • Jumpsuits 
  • Cotton dress 
  • Midi skirts
  • Midi dress
  • Shirtdress
  • Wrap top
  • White shirt

Linen shorts

Shorts may seem too informal to wear to the office, but linen shorts are both cooling and look professional. Linen conducts heat, which means that the heat from your body can escape through the fabric keeping you cool. As long as the shorts you choose are tailored and an office appropriate length, then there is no reason why you shouldn’t be able to wear them. 

Image by Charlotte Powell

Linen trousers

If linen shorts aren’t for you, then try a pair of linen trousers. The linen material will work in exactly the same way as the shorts, with the only difference being the full leg. For extra coolness, try and find a wide leg trouser. 

Photo by Dellon Thomas from Pexels

Sleeveless blazer  

Blazers are a staple in any office, but in the summer, ditch the sleeves and opt for a sleeveless blazer. You will still look professional, however, the missing sleeves will keep your arms bare to the summer breeze. A sleeveless blazer can be paired effortlessly with any garment, however, to add to the look, try a co-ord. 

Photo by Canva Studio from Pexels

Jumpsuits 

Jumpsuits are perfect for all seasons because of the variety of lengths, fits, and materials you can buy them in. They are perfect for quickly throwing on and are comfortable yet professional. To remain cool during the summer, it’s best to opt for a light-weight jumpsuit made from a breathable fabric, such as cotton or linen. Looser fitting jumpsuits are always best for the summer months because you don’t have material clinging to you, making you warmer and more uncomfortable. You may also want to opt for a white or bright coloured jumpsuit as these will reflect the sun, keeping you cool. 

Cotton dress

Similarly to linen, cotton is a breathable fabric that is soft, lightweight, and soaks up sweat. Cotton dresses are ideal for summer in the office because they are lightweight and won’t cling to you, but remain professional looking. Additionally, a cotton dress can be easily transitioned from day to night, which makes it the perfect outfit for a day in the office, followed by after-work drinks. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Midi skirts 

Midi skirts have been a fashionable wardrobe staple since 2019, and are ideal for keeping cool in the office. A skirt is midi if the hem ends halfway between the knee and ankle- it has all the benefits of a shorter skirt, without having to expose your full leg. Midi skirts can be found in a variety of materials and fun patterns, which make them perfect for summer in the office. You can pair a bright midi skirt with a crisp white shirt and look professional whilst remaining cool. 

Photo by Godisable Jacob from Pexels

Midi dress

A midi dress is the alternative to a midi skirt. Similarly to a midi skirt they come in a multitude of fabrics, colours, and patterns, so you can wear something bold without looking unprofessional. There are many different cuts of midi dress, which makes them wearable for all ages and any body types. Like a jumpsuit, a lightweight midi dress is perfect for throwing on in the morning and is guaranteed to keep you cool throughout the working day. 

Photo by @thiszun (follow me on IG, FB) from Pexels

Shirt dress

Shirt dresses are another great choice of dress for staying cool in the summer. A shirt dress borrows details from a typical shirt, such as a collar, buttons, and/or cuffed sleeves, and is made from the same materials as a shirt would be, such as cotton. These dresses are ideal office wear as they have all of the professional benefits or looking like a shirt, with none of the hassle of pairing it with bottoms. Like normal shirts, shirt dresses are incredibly breathable and can be found in many different cuts, making a loose fitting style perfect for staying cool during the summer months. Additionally, shirt dresses can be found in a multitude of lengths, making them a great choice for any office worker. 

Photo by Polina Kovaleva from Pexels

Wrap top 

Wrap tops are made from two triangles of fabric which are overlapped and tied at the back or side. They come in a variety of sleeve lengths, colours, and patterns, but for staying cool in the workplace a short or three-quarter length sleeve and bright colour is preferable. You can find wrap tops in many different materials, however cotton is best for remaining cool. Pair your wrap top with a midi skirt, linen trouser, or linen short, and you won’t even break a sweat. 

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

White shirt 

The classic white shirt is an office staple and perfect for the summer. White is optimal to wear no matter what clothing you are wearing during the summer because it does not absorb heat as much as black or darker colours do. A white cotton or linen shirt will keep you cool whilst you work, and is also easy to pair with a brightly coloured skirt, linen trouser, or shorts.

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Heading back to the office can be difficult after working from home. More of your time will be spent commuting, you have to leave earlier and will get back home later, and you still have a list of household chores to deal with. Luckily, you can tick laundry off of that list, because we’ve got it covered. Book your Laundryheap order today and we will have your clothing picked up, laundered, and redelivered to you in as little as 24 hours. To book your Laundryheap order, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Tips to remove damp smells

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The smell of damp on your clothing means that mould or mildew is growing on the material. This can happen if your clothes are left in a dark and humid environment for too long, or if your washing machine has mould or mildew growing in it. If you notice your clothing smelling damp, try these tips to remove the smell. 

  • Hot water
  • White vinegar
  • Baking soda
  • Bleach
  • Prevention
  • Laundryheap

Hot water 

When washing damp smelling clothing, always use hot water. The hot water will not kill the mould or mildew, however the heat will help to evaporate it, thus removing it from your clothing. Before using hot water on your clothes, always check the care label

White vinegar

The acid found in white vinegar makes it an excellent way to kill mould and mildew and remove damp smells from clothing. To use white vinegar as a pre-treatment for damp clothes, mix one cup with a bucket of warm water and leave your clothing to soak for at least an hour.  Alternatively, add one or two cups of white vinegar directly to your washing machine for the same effect. 

Image by NatureFriend from Pixabay

Baking soda 

Baking soda is incredibly useful at absorbing smells and moisture from clothing, making it perfect for lifting damp smells. Simply add a quarter to half a cup of baking soda directly to your washing machine, and use the hottest temperature your clothing will allow. The baking soda will absorb the dampness in your clothing along with the horrendous smell, and leave your clothes smelling and feeling fresh. 

Image by Aqua Mechanical

Bleach

Bleach is incredibly effective at removing damp from clothing, however should only be used on white clothing. Soak your damp smelling items in one part bleach and 3 parts hot water for a minimum of 30 minutes. The bleach will penetrate your clothing, killing any mould or mildew and lifting the smell of damp. Before using bleach, you may want to test it on an unseen bit of your garment, such as the hem, to make sure that it won’t permanently stain. 

Image by Mike Mozart

Prevention

Now that you have removed the smell of damp from your clothing, here are 5 tips to help prevent mould and mildew from building up on your clothing again. 

  1. Avoid damp clothing

Never hang or fold clothing whilst it is still damp, instead, wait until it has completely dried. Storing clothing whilst it’s still damp creates the perfect damp and humid environment for mould and mildew to grow, leading to clothing smelling damp.

  1. Vaccum seal 

If you know that you won’t be wearing certain garments for a while, for example summer items during the winter, vacuum seal your clothing. This will help keep any mould or mildew out, and leave your clothing smelling fresh until you’re ready the wear them again. 

  1. Have a clear out

An overflowing wardrobe is the perfect environment for mould and mildew to grow. If you notice that your wardrobe is becoming slightly too full, it may be time for a clear out. Get rid, or vacuum seal, the clothing you don’t wear anymore, and give your everyday items room to breathe. Your clothing will thank you for it. 

  1. Clean your machine 

Your clothing may be smelling damp because your washing machine needs to be cleaned. It is vital to clean your washing machine at least once a month to avoid your clothing smelling damp, and to keep your washing machine working properly. 

  1. Reduce your detergent 

Using too much detergent in your washing machine creates a thin layer on your clothing that prevents future washes from properly penetrating your items and removing bacteria. As such, make sure that you always use the recommended amount of detergent in your washing machine. More detergent does not mean cleaner clothes. 

Photo by Ksenia Chernaya from Pexels

Laundryheap 

To guarantee that your clothing doesn’t smell damp, let Laundryheap wash them for you. We will pick up, launder, and redeliver your clothing to you, completely on your schedule. To book your order simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.