Laundryheap Blog – Laundry & Dry Cleaning

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How to remove coffee stains

One minute you’re drinking a coffee, the next, you’re looking down to see a coffee stain on your top. This is how to remove those pesky coffee stains. 

  • Removing coffee stains from synthetic fabrics
  • Removing coffee stains from cotton
  • Using Laundryheap

Removing coffee stains from synthetic fabrics 

Synthetic fabric is any fabric that is man-made as opposed to natural. This includes acrylic, nylon, and polyester. These materials are fairly durable when compared to natural fabrics, so coffee stains are fairly easy to remove. 

You will need…

  • A dry cloth
  • A sponge
  • Warm water
  • Dishwashing detergent 
  • White vinegar 
  • Rubbing alcohol

Begin by blotting the stain with a dry cloth. This will lift any of the excess coffee on the fabric. Remember to blot rather than rub as rubbing will only force the stain further into your fabric. 

Next, create a solution of 1 quarter warm water, half a teaspoon of dish-washing detergent, and one tablespoon of white vinegar. Once made, let your stain soak in the solution for 15 minutes. 

After 15 minutes has passed, remove your stained item from the solution and rinse with warm water. You should notice that the stain is a lighter colour as you wash the solution off. 

Once the solution has been washed off, use a sponge to dab rubbing alcohol onto the remainder of the stain. This will help to lift what is left of the coffee. 

Finally, wash your garment as you usually would. Once washed, if you notice that the stain has not been completely removed, repeat the process again. 

Removing coffee stains from cotton

Cotton, although a natural fabric, is strong. There are two methods that can be used to remove coffee stains from cotton or linen. 

For method one you will need…

  • A dry cloth
  • Warm water
  • Dishwashing detergent 
  • White vinegar
  • A sponge
  • Rubbing alcohol

This method is exactly the same as removing coffee stains from synthetic fabrics. The only difference in this method is that you have to rinse the rubbing alcohol off of your cotton before washing as usual. 

For method two you will need…

  • A rubber band
  • A large bowl
  • A temperature display kettle

Begin by stretching your stained cotton over a large bowl. Secure the material over the bowl with your rubber band. 

After securing your material, boil your temperature display kettle to 200 degrees Fahrenheit. Once boiled pour the water over the stain. Be careful whilst doing so, you don’t want to burn yourself. 

If the stain does not instantly disappear, try pouring fresh water over the stain. 

It is important to note that near-boiling water is safe for cotton, however, can damage some dyes that may have been used on your clothing. To avoid damage to your whole garment you may want to pre-test this method on an inconspicuous part of the item, such as the seam. 

Using Laundryheap

The best way to treat any stain is by using a professional dry cleaning service. If you have a coffee stain, or any other stain, that needs to be treated book a Laundryheap slot. Simply select your service and write in the comments which items are stained and by what, and leave the rest to us. 

To book your Laundryheap dry cleaning slot head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. We are fully operational in London, Birmingham, Manchester, Coventry, Amsterdam, Doha, Kuwait City, Dublin, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Singapore, Boston, New York City, Manama, and, most recently, Rotterdam, and The Hague.  


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Everything you need to know about colour run stains

Image by Aqua Mechanical

When the colours of your clothing bleed together, this is known as a colour run. Colour runs are very common, and this is everything you need to know about them. 

  • Why do colour run stains occur?
  • The colourfastness test
  • How to prevent colour runs 
  • How to get rid of colour run stains

Why do colour run stains occur? 

The brightly coloured clothing that we buy has been dyed using colour pigments. In order for our clothes to remain a vibrant colour, the colour pigments of the dye must be securely attached to the fabric. Colour run occurs when the coloured pigments have not been adequately attached to the fabric. When these inadequately attached pigments come into contact with water, the dye begins to run and can transfer onto other items of clothing. Colour run stains are most apparent when washing isn’t separated. If a darker item of clothing begins to run, it can be damaging to lighter colours of clothing.

Image by Mark Hillary

The colourfastness test

The most effective way to test if your clothing will run in the wash is by using the colourfastness test. This test should be carried out before you wash your item with any other clothing. 

Begin the test by selecting a hidden section of your item, such as the hem or seam. Dampen that section and lay something absorbent on the spot, such as a white paper towel or handkerchief. Next, iron on top of the absorbent material. If the colour from your item bleeds onto the absorbent material than your item is not colourfast and therefore could stain any other clothing it is washed with. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional Photographer and Speaker

How to prevent colour runs 

The best way to minimise the damage of colour run stains is by washing the same, or similar, coloured clothing together. This will mean that, should your colours run in the wash, there will not be a dramatic impact made to your other items in the wash in turns of colour difference. 

It is important to remember that hot water opens the fibres in clothing, therefore encouraging any non-colourfast clothing to run. The best way to combat this issue is to wash your clothing in cold water. 

Finally, to prevent colour runs, don’t leave your washing in a wet pile or in your washing machine, whilst wet, for a long period of time. This encourages any non-colourfast clothing to run and potentially stain multiple items of your clothing.

How to get rid of colour run stains 

If your colours have run and the stain is noticeable the best thing to do is treat the stain as soon as possible. Put your stained item back into the washing machine, on its own, and wash it again using laundry detergent. As long as you act fast, ideally when the item is still wet, the stain should remove itself. If washing your stained item using normal laundry detergent does not treat the stain, you can find specific stain remover laundry detergents. 

If your colour run was particularly bad, don’t forget to put your washing machine on an empty spin to clean out your machine and avoid any damage to the clothes you put in later. 

The best way to avoid colour run stains is by letting us launder your clothes for you. Book your Laundryheap service by visiting the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. We are now servicing Boston, including Boston City, Cambridge, Somerville and Brookline.