Laundryheap Blog – Laundry & Dry Cleaning

Same-day collection. Free delivery in 24 hours.


Leave a comment

Stockholm fun facts

Image by Pedro Szekely

Stockholm is made up of 14 islands that are connected by 57 bridges. It is the capital of Sweden and home to over 975,000 people. But, there is more to Sweden’s capital than just this. 

  • Stockholm’s origins
  • UNESCO World Heritage sites
  • 24-hour sun
  • Swedish meatballs
  • A long and happy life
  • Narrowest street
  • Land of cyclists
  • Gamla Stan
  • The longest art gallery in the world
  • An environmentally conscious city

Stockholm’s origins 

Stockholm was founded by Birger Jarl, who used the city to block off the water passage between Lake Mälaren and the Baltic Sea. The first mention of Stockholm was in 1252, in a letter written by Birger Jarl. Within 100 years, Stockholm became the largest settlement in Sweden. 

Image by Stefan Lins

UNESCO World Heritage sites

Stockholm is home to two UNESCO World Heritage sites- the Royal Palace Drottningholm and The Woodland Cemetery. The Royal Palace is the private residence of the Swedish royal family and a popular tourist attraction. It was added to the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1991. Skogskyrkogården, otherwise known as The Woodland Cemetry, was added to the UNESCO list in 1994 for its groundbreaking design, which has influenced the designs of burial sites around the world. 

Image by denisbin

24 hour sun 

The midnight sun is a natural phenomenon that occurs during the summer months in countries north of the Arctic Circle or south of the Antarctic Circle. In Sweden, this usually occurs during the second half of June, creating endless daylight for weeks at a time. 

Photo by Jonathan Petersson from Pexels

Swedish meatballs

Swedish meatballs are small balls made from a 50-50 ratio of ground pork and ground beef. They are often seasoned with nutmeg, allspice, and white pepper, and served with boiled potatoes and gravy. Shockingly though, Swedish meatballs did not originate in Sweden. In the early 18th century, King Charles XII brought the recipe back to Sweden from his travels in Turkey. 

Image by anokarina

A long and happy life 

Sweden has the 13th highest life expectancy in the world with the average Swede living to 83 years old. This long life expectancy is due to Sweden’s commitment to being environmentally friendly, their healthcare system, which is one of the highest-ranking in the world, and the sense of community found in Sweden. 

Image by Marie Sjödin from Pixabay

Narrowest street

The narrowest street in Stockholm is Mårten Trotzigs alley which, at its slimmest part, is a mere 89 centimeters wide. The alley is named after merchant Mårten Trotzig, who immigrated to Stockholm in 1581, where he became one of the richest merchants in Stockholm. 

Image by Guillaume Capron

Land of cyclists

Over 70 thousand people in Stockholm bike around the city every day. Stockholm is known for its beautiful architecture and luscious green parks, so biking around Stockholm is incredibly peaceful and serene, especially during the spring and summer months. If you choose to ride your bike on the road, there are even dedicated bike lanes to prevent traffic collisions.

Gamla Stan

Gamla Stan is Stockholm’s old town. It dates back to the 13th century and can be defined by its medieval alleyways, cobbled streets, and archaic architecture. Nestled within Gamla Stan you can find the Royal Palace, Stockholm Cathedral, and the Nobel Museum. The towns winning combination of historical buildings and architecture, coupled with its idyllic scenery has transformed Gamla Stan into a popular tourist destination. 

Photo by Katie Evensen from Pexels

The longest art gallery in the world 

Stockholm’s subway system is commonly referred to as the longest art gallery in the world because of the beautiful paintings and mosaics that adorn the walls. 90 of the 100 stations are currently decorated with the work of 150 artists. 

Photo by Jan Židlický from Pexels

An environmentally conscious city

Sweden is an environmental pioneer. It was the first country in the world to pass an environmental protection act and was the host of the first UN conference on the global environment. More than half of the countries national energy supply comes from renewable sources, and by 2045 Sweden wants to become completely fossil-free. Sweden is doing everything it can to save our planet and set an example for countries across the world. 

Photo by Min An from Pexels

Stockholm is an incredibly interesting city, worthy of exploring. It is also just one of the international cities that Laundryheap operates in. To book your Laundryheap Stockholm service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


Leave a comment

Swedish must-reads

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Swedish literature has given us some of the best tales of all time. From children’s stories to crime, romance to comedy, these are just 10 of the must-read books written by Swedish authors. 

  • Hanna’s Daughters by Marianne Fredriksson
  • The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson
  • Depths by Henning Mankell
  • Wilful Disregard by Lena Andersson
  • The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
  • Pippi Langkous by Astrid Lindgren
  • Doctor Glas by Hjalmar Söderberg
  • The Emigrants by Vilhelm Moberg
  • Autumn by Karl Ove Knausgaard
  • The Wonderful Adventures of Nils by Selma Lagerlöf

Hanna’s Daughters by Marianne Fredriksson

If you would like to learn some of the history of Sweden, but don’t fancy reading a long-winded history book, read Hanna’s Daughters. Marianne Fredriksson explores the love, loss, and sacrifice of family life through the eyes of three generations of women. With the ever-changing backdrop of Sweden, this novel will educate you on how Sweden has changed in 100 years, and how that change affected the lives of a grandmother, mother, and daughter. 

Photo by RF._.studio from Pexels

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

You will have likely heard this title before, as the novel was made into a box office hit in 2011. The book was released in 2005 and is the first novel of the Millennium Series by Steig Larsson. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, is a dark psychological thriller, following journalist Mikael Blomkvist and computer hacker Lisbeth Salander as they investigate the murder of Harriet Vanger. More than 100 million copies of the novel have been sold worldwide and it was ranked in The Guardian’s list of ‘100 Best Books of the 21st Century’. 

Photo by Rahul Shah from Pexels

Depths by Henning Mankell

Henning Mankell was a notorious crime author in Sweden, best known for his Wallander series. Depths is a step outside of the usual for Mankell, as he explores historical fiction through the tale of a Navel engineer in the first world war. The story begins with the naval engineer becoming dangerously obsessed with a beautiful woman, and quickly spirals into a warning tale of the dangers of deception. 

Photo by Caio from Pexels

Wilful Disregard by Lena Andersson

Winner of the August Prize 2013, Wilful Disregard is a boy-meets-girl story quite like no other. The tale begins when writer Ester Nilsson is invited to give a lecture about artist Hugo Rask. The two meet for long dinners where they talk extensively, to the point where Ester falls in unrequited love. Despite Ester yearning for his love, Hugo gives her just enough hope to think he may fall for her, before taking it away. In this novel, Lena Anderson dissects the theme of love and passion and retells the classic boy-meets-girl tale in a brutally honest way.

Photo by Ravi Kant from Pexels

The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson

The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window, was the bestselling novel of 2010 in Sweden. The story begins on Allan’s 100th birthday, which he celebrates by breaking out of the old people’s home he resides in. He is determined to fill his final days with adventure and, as he does, we learn of the adventures he has had in his past. This piece of hilarious comedy fiction is bound to make you laugh out loud. Once you have finished reading the book, watch the 2013 film adaptation of the same name.  

Photo by Samson Katt from Pexels

Pippi Langkous by Astrid Lindgren

Pippi Langkous, or Pippi Longstocking, has been an icon of children’s literature since her first appearance in 1945. She is a 9-year-old girl who lives alone with her pet monkey, horse, and a suitcase full of gold. She has superhuman strength and an anarchic attitude, which leads her on a multitude of fun adventures and mishaps. Pippi Longstocking is still widely read, and the character has been developed for TV and film and is still inspiring children to have fun adventures today. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Doctor Glas by Hjalmar Söderberg

When Doctor Glas was first published in 1905, it quickly became one of the most controversial books of the 1900s. Söderberg was a novelist, playwright, poet, and journalist, but Doctor Glas nearly ruined his career. The novel tells the story of the titular character and his love for one of his married patients. As his lover begins to confide in him about her failed marriage with a clergyman, Doctor Glas begins to ponder on whether to murder her husband, and what the repercussions of this act may be. With themes such as murder, abortion, and women’s rights heavily featuring throughout the book, it was heavily criticized when it was first published but is now considered a Swedish classic. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

The Emigrants by Vilhelm Moberg

The Emigrants is part history, part drama, and 100% gripping. Split into 4 volumes, it tells the history of the crushing poverty that forced 1.5 million Swedes to emigrate to North America in the 1800s. The tale focuses on Kristina and Karl-Oskar and their family, friends, and enemies, but serves as a representation of the history of millions. It perfectly explains why so many Swedes have a complicated relationship with both Swedish and American history. 

Photo by Daria Shevtsova from Pexels

Autumn by Karl Ove Knausgaard

Autumn is one of the four books that Ove Knausgaard wrote with a seasonal title. It is autobiographical, and begins with a letter written by Knausgaard to his unborn child. The book itself is an introspective account of Knausgaard’s daily life with his wife and children in rural Sweden. Despite its mundane content, the way Knausgaard writes is reflective, and made Autumn a New York Times bestseller. 

Photo by Gabby K from Pexels

The Wonderful Adventures of Nils by Selma Lagerlöf

This dark, yet geographically educational, children’s book has been a young reader’s staple since it was first published in 1906. The book begins with Nils mistreating animals on his family’s farm. When Nils is turned into an elf, he mounts a goose and flies across Sweden. As Nils travels from province to province, tales are told of characters in each province. This book is adventurous and fun and has taught children about the country of Sweden since it was first published. 

Photo by Alex Green from Pexels

Whilst you read, we will make sure that your laundry basket doesn’t overflow. To book your Laundryheap order, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.