Laundryheap Blog – Laundry & Dry Cleaning

Same-day collection. Free delivery in 24 hours.


Leave a comment

Top places to shop in Amsterdam

If you’re looking to do a little bit of retail therapy whilst in Amsterdam, these are the top 5 places to shop. 

  • De Negen Straatjes
  • PC Hooftstraat
  • Magna Plaza 
  • De Bijenkorf
  • Waterlooplein Flea Market

De Negen Straatjes 

De Negen Straatjes, or The Nine Streets, can be found in the heart of Amsterdam. As the name suggests, this shopping district is formed from nine streets that hold quaint boutiques ready to browse. De Negen Straatjes is perfect if you are looking for something a bit quirky. The streets are lined with vintage stores and boutiques that stock all manner of styles in an array of prices. The Nine Streets also come equipped with several quaint cafes that are perfect for a post-shop coffee

PC Hooftstraat

If you are looking for a more expensive shopping experience than head to PC Hooftstraat. Renowned for being Amsterdam’s most exclusive shopping street, you will find all the top designer brands on this street, including Chanel, Mulberry, and Louis Vuitton, amongst others. Located in the museum district of Amsterdam, once you’ve perused the shops of PC Hooftstraat, you can wander to the Van Gogh museum, or to one of the several restaurants located nearby. 

Magna Plaza 

Formerly the Amsterdam post office, the Magna Plaza is Amsterdam’s best-known department store. Situated across the street from the Royal Palace and Dam Square, this impressive building could not be in a better location. Spread out over three floors is every shoppers dream. From clothes to shoes, jewelry to gifts, you will find everything you need at the Magna Plaza. There is even a cheese counter where you can purchase famous Dutch cheese to take home. 

De Bijenkorf

De Bijenkorf is the perfect mixture of a department store and designer high street. It is actually a chain of high-end department stores, but the Amsterdam store was the first to open in 1870. De Bijenkorf translates to The Beehive, which is fitting as shoppers flit from floor to floor, exploring brands such as Gucci, Diesel, and Ralph Lauren. They even have a premium denim department which is said to be the best place to shop for all of your denim garments. 

Waterlooplein Flea Market 

Amsterdam is home to an abundance of open-air markets, but Waterlooplein is definitely one to check out. You will find everything at Waterlooplein- bikes, furniture, second-hand clothing, art, books, and even electronics. With such an array of objects to sift through, Waterlooplein Flea Market provides the perfect opportunity to slow down as you make your way from vendor to vendor, finding the best bargains and hidden treasures. Keep in mind that Waterlooplein Flea Market is opened every day except Sunday. 

Whilst your shopping let us take care of your laundry. Head to the Laundryheap website or download our free Laundryheap app to book your service. We are now operating in Amsterdam, The Hague, and Rotterdam. 


Leave a comment

Things to do this Labour Day

Labour Day 2020 will be like no other Labour Day that has come before it. Due to COVID restrictions, many of the usual celebrations will be restricted, or not going ahead at all. That does not mean that the day should not be celebrated. Here are some COVID-safe things to do this Labour Day. 

  • Dip into a swimming hole
  • Watch a drive-in movie
  • Organise your own parade
  • Host a cookout
  • Enjoy a Labour Day camp out

Dip into a swimming hole

Sometimes it’s nice to be at-one with nature, especially when you spend your days relentlessly working. There are natural swimming holes located across America that are perfect for a Labour Day dip. Immerse yourself in refreshing waters, as you take in the mountains that surround you, and let all of your stresses melt away. A quick search will let you know where your closest swimming hole is. 

Image by Gerry & Bonni

Watch a drive-in movie

Drive-in movies were all the range in 50’s America, and some businesses are keeping them alive. With a mixture of new releases and golden oldies being shown on a regular basis, the only thing you need to enjoy a drive-in is a car. Gather your loved ones in the car, get the popcorn in, and enjoy a Labour Day movie in the same way they did in the past. 

Organise your own parade

A big part of Labour Day is the parade, so why not host your own? Gather your family, friends, and neighbours, adhering to social distancing of course, and put on an amazing parade. Spend the day making flags, banners, and getting dressed up, then march up and down your street to show off your hard work. Just make sure that you make your neighbours aware before you start making too much noise. 

Host a cookout

This Labour Day why not host a good old all-American cookout. Gather your friends and family and enjoy a spread of burgers, hotdogs, corn, etc. You have earned this holiday, so treat yourself to some good food and good company to enjoy it with. Make sure that you stay socially distanced and adhere to COVID guidelines. 

Enjoy a Labour Day camp out

Take advantage of the long weekend and camp out under the stars. Whether you camp with friends, family, or just on your own, enjoy some well-earned time to rest. Make smores on a campfire, go star-gazing, and simply enjoy some time out of the office. You don’t even have to travel to a campsite, simply do it in your own backyard. 

Don’t let laundry get in the way of your Labour Day fun. Let us take care of your laundry by booking a Laundryheap service. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. We are operational in Boston and New York City, including Queens, Brooklyn, Manhattan, and The Bronx. 


Leave a comment

Top tips for packing a travel backpack

Whether you’re camping for a week, or travelling the world on a gap year, packing a travel backpack is difficult. Here are some tips to help you out. 

  • Make a list
  • Pockets, pockets, pockets
  • Be versatile 
  • Roll your clothes
  • Toiletries at the top
  • Don’t forget a plastic bag
  • Make sure it’s waterproof
  • Weight distribution
  • Make your bag distinctive
  • Lock it up

Make a list 

Before you even begin packing you need to write a list. Write down everything that you need- clothes, shoes, underwear, toiletries, etc. Writing a list will help you to visualise exactly what you will need to fit in your backpack and can help you eliminate the unnecessary items. Additionally, writing down what you will need could help you to think of essentials that you may have forgotten about. Once you have made your list, you can then begin to think about the space that your backpack provides you and how everything is going to fit into it. 

Pockets, pockets, pockets

You may have noticed that your travel backpack has an abundance of pockets. You need to utilise the space that these pockets provide. They are perfect for separating your clothes, storing important items, such as money and your passport, and even storing your water bottle in an accessible place. Take note of the location of these pockets and, before you begin packing, evaluate what items will be best to put in them.

Be versatile 

When it comes to the clothing that you pack be as versatile as possible. You don’t have a lot of room, so you need to be smart about the clothing you choose. You need to pack suitable clothing for the climate that you are travelling to, that can be worn on multiple occasions. Remember, whilst your travelling you may not always have access to cleaning facilities, so think about investing in easily washable, and stain-resistant clothing. 

Roll your clothes

Once you have made a list and decided on your items, you can begin packing. It’s important to always be conscious of the amount of space that you have in your backpack. To conserve as much space as possible, roll your clothes rather than fold them. Not only will this conserve space, but it will also prevent your clothes from becoming overly wrinkled

Image by WordRidden

Toiletries at the top

It’s always best to leave your toiletries until last so that they rest at the top of your backpack. As you are travelling there will be times when you want to quickly freshen up, maybe after a long hike or particularly gruelling plane ride, and the easier your toiletries can be accessible the sooner you can continue your adventure. You never know when you will need a deodorant top-up, so it’s best to keep it somewhere accessible, just in case. 

Image by Jack Kennard

Don’t forget a plastic bag 

Unlike when packing for a normal holiday, when you’re packing a travel backpack you need to think about things that you will need for every scenario. Plastic bags, for example, are a staple for any backpacker. They can be used to store dirty and/or wet clothes so, when you do come across a cleaning facility, you will know what items need to be washed. This delays the amount of time you spend doing laundry and gives you more time to explore.

Make sure it’s waterproof

No matter what climate you are travelling to your backpack must be waterproof. You don’t want your clothing, possessions, and important travel documents to become water-logged on your travels. If your backpack is not already waterproof, or if you would like an extra waterproof layer for protection, you can buy a waterproof bag cover. 

Image by Kevin Teague

Weight distribution

It’s important to remember that you will be carrying your backpack with you most, if not at all, times whilst you are travelling. This means that you have to make sure that your backpack is not too heavy or difficult for you to carry. The best way to ensure this is to put the heaviest items nearest to your spine, meaning that they are packed first and towards the middle of the bag. Medium-weighted items should be put towards the top of your backpack, with the lightest items, such as clothing, being put at the bottom. The aim is to keep the weight centred and close to your body so that it doesn’t pull painfully at your back and shoulders. 

Make your bag distinctive 

There are only a certain number of different travel backpack designs. This means that you may come into contact with other people who have the same, or at least a very similar, backpack as yourself. To avoid any potential bag mix-up make sure that your backpack is very distinctive looking. This way, if you do lose it for any reason, you can easily describe it. Use bright colours and embellishments to make your bag stand out. Think outside of the box and get creative. 

Lock it up 

You need to make sure that your backpack is as safe and secure as possible. Buy yourself a lock that can be looped around your backpack and prevent people without a key from accessing the contents of it. The easiest way to prevent anything from happening to your bag is to make sure that it is with you at all times. Try not to let your bag out of your sight if you can. 

Luckily, Laundryheap is fully operational in several countries around the world, including Singapore, Kuwait and the US. Whilst your travelling don’t forget to use our postcode checker to see if we can take the stress of doing laundry away from you. Head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your slot now. 


Leave a comment

The ultimate guide to moving to Dublin

Blue Night Sky Cityscape Urban Dublin City

Dublin is the capital city of Ireland. It’s home to 1,273,069 people and has an unrivaled mix of historic buildings, open green spaces, and vibrant nightlife. If you’re moving to Dublin, here is everything you will need to know.

  • Housing 
  • Jobs
  • Transferring money
  • Education
  • Transport
  • Culture

Housing 

Before you begin looking at properties in Dublin, first consider how long you will be staying for and what space you need. There are several options for housing in Dublin, including a house, flat, or even a room share. The price of housing is dependant on the space that you acquire and how close to the city centre you are located. For example, on average, a one-bedroom apartment in Dublin city centre would cost you €1,013 to rent per month. In comparison, a one-bedroom apartment outside of the city centre would cost you €835 on average per month. If you are moving alone, and want to save some money, then consider moving into a house share. You will be given your own room, but you will share communal areas with other individuals in the house.

Jobs

Dublin has become a center for international business. Google, eBay, and Amazon all have offices in and around the Dublin area. Asides from international business, tourism is a big moneymaker in Dublin. Being home to Guinness and Jameson whiskey, in addition to the array of historic buildings there are to visit, there are plenty of jobs available in the tourism sector of Dublin.

Transferring money

Once you have moved to Dublin you will need to transfer your money into euros. When transferring your money it’s best to look for somewhere that will give you the best exchange rate. This could be your bank or an outside company. You need to make sure that your money is transferred in a safe and secure way, so do plenty of research before you decide how to transfer your money. 

Education

Education is mandatory in Dublin from the age of 4 to 18. There are both public and private schools available, however, it is important to remember that private schools charge fees to attend whereas public schools do not. For those who want to continue their education after mandatory education, there are a number of prestigious universities in Dublin including Trinity College, which is notoriously difficult to get into. 

SONY DSC

Transport 

There are several ways to get around the city of Dublin including bus, tram, and bike.

There are over 900 buses, and 18 night busses, that service Dublin and its surrounding suburbs. The price of a bus ride is dependent on how far you are traveling, however, it usually falls around €3. 

The Luas Tram is the most time-efficient way to travel around Dublin. It consists of two tram lines, the Green Line and the Red Line, which connect suburban areas of Dublin to the city center. Similarly to the buses, the prices of the tram vary. On average a one-way ticket costs €2.50, however, if you are regularly traveling in and out of Dublin, you can purchase a week pass for €24, or a monthly pass for €95. 

If you want to get some exercise whilst travelling through the city, there are Coca-Cola Zero Dublin Bikes available to hire. These bikes are a self-service rental system that can be used across Dublin. What is more, the first 30 minutes of your bike ride is completely free of charge. If you are planning on using the bikes more than once you may want to consider buying an annual card for €20. 

Image by William Murphy

Culture 

Dublin is the cultural epicentre of Irish life. The city has homed some of the most renowned talents from history, including legendary playwright Oscar Wilde, novelist Bram Stoker, and, of course, lead singer of U2 Bono.

There are a plethora of museums and art galleries in Dublin that showcase both ancient and modern history. If you are a lover of the arts, there are daily concerts, theatre performances, and exhibitions that are waiting to be explored. 

Aside from the abundance of art, history, and performances that can be enjoyed in and around Dublin, the city is also well-known for its spectacular food. Home to five Michelin star restaurants, and a food festival during the month of June, Dublin’s food pedigree is growing every year. 

Image by q phia

If you’re worried about doing your laundry in Dublin, don’t, because we are here to help. Laundryheap is fully operational in Dublin. Head to the Laundryheap website and use our postcode searcher to find out if we deliver to you. 


Leave a comment

How to make the most of a short holiday

Image by nile from Pixabay

When your holiday only lasts for a long weekend, or a few short days, it can seem like there isn’t enough time to get much done. That is not true. This is how to make the most of a short holiday.

  • Be prepared 
  • Unplug
  • Consider your hotel location
  • Prioritize 
  • Hire a guide
  • Try something new
  • Wake up early
  • Live like a local
  •  Be aware of time zones 
  • Give yourself time to relax

Be prepared

The key to any successful holiday is being prepared, but when you know you have a limited amount of time the need to prepare is heightened. To adequately prepare for your holiday, you first need to establish what type of holiday you want. Do you simply want to relax by the pool or on the beach? Or are you looking for more of an adventure, exploring a new city or town? After you’ve established the holiday you want, you can start researching what is available for you to do- guided tours, activities, restaurants in the local area, etc. Once you’ve done your research, set a loose itinerary for your holiday. You don’t want to put yourself under pressure by scheduling in too much in a small amount of time, but creating a loose itinerary as a guide will ensure that you see and experience all of your bucket-list things. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional Photographer and Speaker

Unplug

Holidays are all about escaping from your everyday reality. When on a short holiday, it’s best to soak up every moment of not being in your everyday surroundings. The best way to do this is to completely unplug. Keep your phone available and fully-charged just in case of an emergency, but don’t constantly be checking it. Leave the technology behind, and embrace the feeling of being outside of your normal routine. Before you know it, you’ll be back at work, so you need to enjoy your well-deserved time-off whilst you can. 

Consider your hotel location

Short holidays mean less time to explore, however that doesn’t mean that you need to miss out on the excitement of exploring a new place. When booking your hotel, look at what is in the immediate surrounding area and what is close by. Choose hotels close to the city or beach, depending on your holiday preference. Make sure that there are good transport links if you want to go on a day-trip further afield. Check the local bars and restaurants in the area. Make sure that you pick a hotel that will allow you to do everything you want to do in the time frame you have. 

Prioritise 

If you like adventurous holidays then there is probably a long list of things that you would like to achieve whilst away. That being said, on short holiday’s you won’t have the time to experience everything. Make a bucket-list of the top 5 or 10 things you want to see and/or do whilst your on holiday and prioritise your top 3. Doing this will ensure that, even though you may not see everything you want to see on your holiday, you will at least see the most important things you wanted to. 

Hire a guide

The best way to see a location in a short period of time is by taking a guided tour. Guided tours will take you around a city or a certain area of a country, and explain the history and cultural significance of it. Whether it’s an open-top bus tour or a walking tour, investing in a guide is a great way to see the highlights of a place in a short amount of time. 

Image by Andrew Bowden

Try something new

Part of the thrill of going on holiday is experiencing something new. Whether that is a new country, a new destination, or even a new way of living. Whilst on your short holiday, push yourself to try a new experience. It could be anything from a new cuisine, to just talking to a new person. Being on holiday is the perfect opportunity to explore new experiences you would never try in your everyday life, no matter how long your holiday is. 

Image by Engin Akyurt from Pixabay

Wake up early

If you have a long list of experiences that you want to try whilst on your short holiday, it’s best to wake up early. Some people enjoy relaxing and not having to set an alarm whilst on holiday, however, if you know that there’s a lot you want to achieve, it’s best to start your day early. Don’t force yourself to wake up early every day though, remember that you are also on holiday to relax. 

An alarm clock showing the time set at nine o’clock in the morning (09:00 / 9AM)

Live like a local 

If you’re holidaying in a country you have never explored before it can be exciting to spend your time living like a local. Before heading on your holiday, do some research into bars, restaurants, and general places where locals will go. When on your holiday, engage a local in general conversation and show a willingness to get to know about their culture and way of life. You will get a much more authentic experience out of a country if you spend, even a day, living like a local. 

Image by
Marco Verch Professional Photographer and Speaker

Be aware of time zones 

When travelling outside of your home country it’s best to remember if there is a time difference. Depending on where you are travelling to and from in the world could depend on whether you get an extra few hours on holiday or not. If you are aware of the time zones you are travelling to and from prior to your trip, you can easily plan around it. 

Image by Janiere Fernandez from Pexels

Give yourself time to relax

The most important thing to remember when going on holiday, no matter its length, is to relax. You are going on holiday to escape your normal life, have a new experience, and unwind. Remember to enjoy your time off and not stress yourself out if you don’t see or do everything you wanted to. 

Don’t worry about the post-holiday washing, leave it to us to pick-up, dry clean, iron, and re-deliver to you. You can even pre-book your laundry pick-up up to two weeks in advance. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


Leave a comment

Top day trips just outside of Amsterdam

When you’re on holiday, sometimes it’s nice to explore areas outside of the city centre. Here are the top 10 day trips to enjoy just outside of Amsterdam

  • Keukenhof Tulip Garden
  • Rotterdam
  • The Hague 
  • Giethoorn 
  • Batavia Stad
  • Gouda
  • Delft
  • Kinderdijk
  • Muiderslot Castle
  • Efteling

Keukenhof Tulip Garden

The Keukenhof Tulip Garden is one of the most iconic landscapes in the Netherlands. It is the world’s largest flower garden, home to 7 million flowers including daffodils, orchids, roses, and the Netherlands famous tulips. Take in the spectacle of fragrance and colour as you wander through gardens and pavilions, observing a multitude of flowers.  

The fastest way to reach the Keukenhof Tulip Garden from Amsterdam is to take the train to Haarlem and then get the Keukenhof Express bus to the Tulip Garden. 

Rotterdam

If you enjoy city holidays, then why not explore the Netherlands second-biggest city Rotterdam? If you are taking a day-trip to Rotterdam, take in the whole city by travelling 185 meters up the Euromast. Your journey will be taken in a rotating glass elevator so even as you travel you can observe the beauty of the city. Once you have reached the top, take in the stunning cityscape. When you’re feet touch solid ground again, take a stroll down the Maas river and explore the abundance of cafes and restaurants there are on offer. 

There are direct trains running from Amsterdam to Rotterdam so travel is no issue. 

Image by Guilhem Vellut

The Hague

The Hague is the International City of Peace and Justice. Not only is it home to the United Nations International Court of Justice and Peace Palace, but it is also home to the Dutch government and the Dutch royal family. Whilst exploring The Hague, don’t forget to visit The Mauritshuis. Featuring masterpieces by groundbreaking artists, such as Andy Warhol, Rembrandt and Vermeer, it is a must-see.

Direct trains run from Amsterdam Central to Hague central.

Giethoorn 

Giethoorn is a hidden gem. It is a classic Netherlands village, built on a complex series of canals that are best explored by Gondola. Once you’ve explored the village by boat, explore it by foot. Giethoorn is a picturesque village in every way. From its abundance of flowers to the perfectly restored farmhouses, Giethoorn is the perfect place to escape from the hustle and bustle of central Amsterdam and enjoy some country living. 

From Amsterdam Central station, take a train to Steenwijk. There are direct trains available but if you find a connecting train via Zwolle, that will also get you to Giethoorn. 

SONY DSC

Batavia Stad

If you area lover of shopping then you must visit Batavia Stad- the Netherlands leading outlet shopping mall. Explore 250 brands across 150 stores before enjoying a meal at one of the many cafes and restaurants that can be found throughout the outlet. There is something for everyone at Batavia Stad, but be aware that it is best to visit the outlet on a clear day as it is open air. 

Batavia Stad is just outside Amsterdam city centre and there is a free shuttle bus that can take you straight to the outlet.

Gouda

If you love cheese then visit Gouda. In Market Square every Thursday Gouda hosts the Gouda Cheese Market where you can truly step back in time. Observe as cheese wheels are carried around by sellers in traditional costumes and sold on the market stalls. Once you have travelled around the market, don’t miss out on the opportunity to explore the rest of the historical town. There are several buildings, dating back to the 13th century, that perfectly preserves the history of the Netherlands. The Gouda Stadhuis, for example, was constructed back in 1448 and is a prime example of perfectly preserved gothic architecture.

There are direct trains available from Amsterdam Central to Gouda. 

Image by bertknot

Delft

The old Netherlands town of Delft will provide you with the perfect opportunity to relax away from the city. Best known for it’s Delft Blue pottery, this old Holland town is complete with beautiful canals that can be explored by walking over classic humped bridges. If you want to see the whole of the town, climb up to the top of the New Church and take in the picturesque town in all of its glory. 

There are direct trains from Amsterdam to Delft. 

Kinderdijk

The Netherlands is well known for its iconic windmills. If you want to see those windmills in action then visit Kinderdijk. At Kinderdijk you will find historic windmills that date back to the 16th and 18th centuries. You won’t only find picture-perfect scenery at Kinderdijk, but you will find a rich history that is protected as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. If you’re interested in the history of the Netherlands, you won’t want to miss Kinderdijk. 

The easiest way to reach Kinderdijk is by car, however there are organised tours that will take you to the historical site. 

Image by kkmarais

Muiderslot Castle

Dating back to the 12th Century, and complete with a moat, Muiderslot Castle is the perfect day out for families. This is not simply an opportunity to stroll around an ancient castle, this is an opportunity to learn about the history of the Netherlands in an interactive way. As you travel around the castle there are interactive games to play, dress-up opportunities, and even falcon displays on Saturdays. Once you have fully explored the castle, take in the beautiful gardens that you are free to wander at your leisure. What is more, if you have an iAmsterdam City card you can get in for free. 

If you are feeling adventurous, take a bike ride from Amsterdam to Muiderslot Castle. Otherwise, you can drive via car or take the train. 

Image by pautrecht from Pixabay

Efteling

Efteling is an amusement park like no other. It is the largest theme park in the Netherlands and one of the oldest theme parks in the world. Each attraction found at the park reflects elements from ancient myths and legends, fairy tales, fables, and folklore. 15 million people visit the park each year and enjoy not only the park but the four-star Efteling Hotel and 18-hole golf course. 

The best option for travelling to Efteling is by bus. 

If you are living in Amsterdam, or even just enjoying a shot stay, book your Laundryheap service by visiting the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


Leave a comment

New York City Fun Facts

Photo by Roberto Vivancos from Pexels

New York is one of the most famous cities in the world. From The Empire State Building to the Statue of Liberty, everyone knows at least something about The Big Apple. But, did you know any of these 10 New York City fun facts?

  • The meaning behind The Big Apple
  • The languages of New York 
  • The story of the Statue of Liberty
  • The length of the Subway system
  • The Empire State Building
  • New York’s coastline
  • Rich New Yorkers
  • The Pizza Principle
  • The whispering gallery
  • The New York City library

The meaning behind The Big Apple

New York City is lovingly known by many as The Big Apple. There are many rumours about how this nickname came about, including a nod to the Great Depression when prior financiers would sell apples to make money. The first published use of the term was in the 1920’s when sports writer John J Fitzgerald used the phrase to describe New York’s horse racing track. It wasn’t until the 1970’s that the name The Big Apple began to be widely used in reference to New York itself.

The languages of New York

There are over 800 different languages spoken in New York, making it one of the most linguistically diverse cities in the world. As a result of the cities’ rich immigration history, Only 51% of its residents solely speak English, the other 49% are bilingual. The second most popular language in New York is Spanish, followed by Chinese and Russian.

The story of The Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty is arguably New York’s most notable landmark. Standing 83 metres tall, The Statue of Liberty is a historic American landmark that millions marvel at every year. The statue arrived in New York in 1885, in 214 crates and 350 pieces. It was a gift from France to celebrate America’s centennial celebration. Interestingly, the statues iconic arm holding the torch arrived in America a decade earlier in 1876. It was put on display at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia to raise money for the construction of the whole statue.

Photo by Jesús Mirón García from Pexels

The length of the Subway system

New York’s Subway system is one of the largest urban mass transportation systems in the world. Each year, approximately 1,727,366,607 passengers use the underground system, consisting of 34 lines and 469 stops. If you were to travel to every stop on the system, without leaving the Subway, it would take you 21 hours and 49 minutes. 

The Empire State Building

The Empire State Building is another of New York’s famous landmarks. Standing 102 stories high in Midtown Manhattan, it has been a New York highlight since 1930. Despite being a notable NYC landmark, The Empire State building is very unlucky. There is a 1 in 9 million chance of being struck by lightning twice in your lifetime. The Empire State Building is struck 23 times every year!

New York’s coastline

When you think about American coastlines, New York will not be the first place you think about. That being said, New York actually has a coastline of 520 miles, which is longer than the coasts of Miami, Boston, Los Angeles, and San Francisco combined.

Rich New Yorkers

New York is the only city in the world that is home to more than 100 billionaires. There are actually 113 billionaires currently living in the city, the richest of which is former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has an estimated net worth of $60.1 billion. Asides from the billionaires, there are also more than 380 million millionaires living in New York City. 

The Pizza Principle

For over 50 years the average price of a Subway ride and the average price of a slice of pizza has been relatively the same. Whenever one of the prices goes up or down, so does the other. Economists have lovingly named this the Pizza Principle. 

Image by Mike Licht

The whispering gallery

Grand Central Terminal is a commuter rail terminal in Midtown Manhattan and home to the whispering gallery. If you were to stand at one corner of the platform and have a friend stand at a diagonal corner to yourself you will be able to whisper to each other. This secret conversation can happen because of the perfectly curved arches that make up the platform. 

Image by Andreas Wulff

The New York City Library

The New York City Library is the third biggest library in the world and the second biggest library in America. It is home to 50 million books and when the library first opened in 1911 it was the largest marble building ever built in America. Today 3.5 million people inhabit the library and explore its extensive collections.

If you are in the New York City area don’t forget to book your Laundryheap dry cleaning service. Use the code FIRST10 to get $10 off of your first order. To book your slot head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


Leave a comment

Best places to visit in Dublin

With lockdown restrictions being eased across the world we can begin thinking about places to visit once we are free to travel. If you happen to be venturing to Dublin, these are the best places to go. 

  • Grafton Street
  • The Jameson Distillery 
  • The Guinness Storehouse 
  • Phoenix Park 
  • St Patrick’s Cathedral
  • National Museum of Ireland 
  • Croke Park

Grafton Street 

If you’re looking for a quirky shopping experience than Grafton Street is the perfect place for you. The street is buzzing 24/7 with buskers playing everything from tin whistles to acoustic guitars- in fact, U2 front man Bono returns every year to play a set. Boutiques, jewellers, and department stores line both sides of the street, but the highlight is Bewley’s, Dublin’s oldest cafe. At the bottom of this eclectic street is a statue of Molly Malone, the fictional character from Dublin’s famous ballad of the same name. Grafton Street is perfect for a lazy wander, drifting in and out of shops and enjoying the live entertainment. 

Image by William Murphy

The Jameson Distillery 

Since it was founded in 1780, Jameson has been the best selling Irish whiskey on the planet. Despite the original Dublin distillery no longer producing whiskey, the Jameson Distillery tour is not one to be missed. Explore the history of the famous whiskey and it’s founding fathers on a 40-minute tour, ending with a sample of the whiskey in JJ’s bar. In addition to the tour, whiskey tasting, cocktail making classes and whiskey blending classes can be bought. 

Image by http://klarititemplateshop.com/

The Guinness Storehouse

If whiskey isn’t your drink of choice, why not take 1 of the 3 guided tours on offer at the world-famous, Guinness Storehouse. If you are a particularly big lover of Guinness, you can take the ultimate 3-hour Guinness Brewery tour. Completely immerse yourself in the history of Guinness by exploring the Roast House, Brew House, and underground passenger tunnels. After your tour, indulge yourself in an exclusive beer sampling session, trying limited-edition Guinness brews. 

If the 3-hour guided tour isn’t for you, why not take the 1-hour tour of the brewing and advertising floors. After your 1-hour excursion, you’ll experience a tutored tasting session of a range of Guinness brews. Or why not enjoy the Connoisseur experience, where you can sit back and relax with a private tasting experience. Whatever package you decide, it wouldn’t be right to visit the home of Guinness without exploring its storehouse. 

Phoenix Park 

Stretching over 2.7 square miles, Phoenix Park is the largest Urban park in any European capital city. Enjoy a sunny day lying in the grass, or go on a long bike ride around the park, taking in your serene surroundings. If you’re looking for something to do other than lazing in the park, you can take a guided tour of the President of Ireland’s home. Additionally, why not make a visit to Dublin Zoo. Established in 1831, it is one of the oldest zoos in the world and is host to exotic animals from across the world. It’s the perfect day out for all the family

Image by Tambako The Jaguar

St Patrick’s Cathedral

Legend has it that St Patrick, patron saint of Ireland, baptised people into Christianity at St Patrick’s Cathedral 1500 years ago. Since then, countless people have been baptised at the Cathedral, and still are. Take in the religious grounds of St Patrick’s Cathedral and bask in its spirituality. Note that famous Gulliver’s Travels author Johnathon Swift is buried there with a collection of his early work. Whether you are religious or not, this beautiful 11th Century Cathedral is a wonder that should not be missed.

Image by William Murphy

National Museum of Ireland 

The National Museum of Ireland is compromised of 4 different museums, 3 of which can be enjoyed in Dublin. Free to enter, take in the Museum of Archeology, Museum of Decorative Art and History, and the Museum of Natural History. Amongst the wealth of historical artefacts, is an exquisite collection of Irish metalwork that is a true sight to behold. In addition, the Museum of Natural History has charmingly been dubbed the Dead Zoo due to its extensive collection of taxidermy animals. The National Museum of Ireland is a historic discovery that is equal parts educational as it is fun to explore.

Croke Park 

Named after Archbishop Croke, Croke Park is the third-largest stadium in Ireland and the centre for Gaelic sport. A tour around Croke Park will offer you the chance to try your hand at Hurling and Gaelic Football, as well as tour the players changing room and the VIP area. If you’re feeling daring, why not take the Skyline Tour which takes you 17 stories up, to a platform suspended above the stadium. From the platform enjoy panoramic views of Croke Park and the rest of Dublin.  

Image by William Murphy

Despite lockdown restrictions slowly being eased, we still need to ensure that we are keeping ourselves and those around us safe. Book your hot wash service with us and we will deliver your laundry contactless and within 24 hours. Visit the Laundryheap website or download the Laundryheap app to make your booking.


Leave a comment

Amsterdam fun facts

If being in self-isolation is leaving you yearning for a holiday more than ever, here are 10 fun facts about Amsterdam. The ideal post-isolation city break destination. 

  • Amsterdam got its name from the Amstel river
  • Amsterdam is the new capital of the Netherlands
  • Amsterdam lies below sea level
  • Amsterdam has over 100 canals
  • There are over 2,000 houseboats in Amsterdam
  • Amsterdam is home to dancing houses
  • Amsterdam’s tap water is safe to drink
  • Amsterdam is home to some of the most famous museums in the world
  • Amsterdam’s floating flower market 
  • Amsterdam’s tourists drastically outweighs its locals

Amsterdam got its name from the Amstel river 

Amsterdam was founded as a fishing village in the 12th century. The city grew around the Amstel river and was protected by a dam that prevented flooding from the  ZuiderZee (South Sea). Thus the name Amsterdam was given to the city as a combination of Amsel and Dam. 

Image by Giorgio Baresi

Amsterdam is the new capital of the Netherlands 

Amsterdam only became the official capital of the Netherlands in 1983. Prior to this, everyone assumed that Amsterdam was the capital but it was never official. Despite being the capital city of the Netherlands, Amsterdam isn’t the political capital. The Netherlands government buildings are actually housed in Hague.

Amsterdam lies below sea level 

Half of the Netherlands, including Amsterdam, is situated below sea level. In the 12th and 13th century, residents would dig ditches and remove water to pump windmills. This resulted in the ground getting progressively lower to the point where half of the Netherlands now remains 2 meters below sea level. Without the dikes and dunes that are enforced every year, the Netherlands would be submerged underwater.

Amsterdam has over 100 canals 

There are 165 canals across Amsterdam, which separate the city into 90 different islands. The majority of them were built in the 17th century, during the Dutch Golden Age. They now have a combined length of 100km. Amsterdam is notorious for its canals, so much so that the historic Canal Belt, or ‘Grachtengordel’ in Dutch, is one of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites. 

There are over 2,000 houseboats in Amsterdam  

Amsterdam’s canals are home to 2,500 houseboats, many of which have been afloat for centuries. Houseboats are either wooden or concrete, with the concrete ones being most desirable. If you own a wooden houseboat you are legally required to take it to a shipyard every three years for repairs and to be painted. The majority of the boats are residential, however, you can find hotel houseboats and even museum houseboats. 

Amsterdam is home to Dancing Houses

The Dancing Houses of Amsterdam are famous. Found on the edge of the Damrak canal these houses get their name from their crooked appearance. Originally built as both houses and offices for wealthy bankers, the soil these houses were built on was so swampy that they had to be built on stilts. This caused the houses to wobble and sink slightly, making them off-balance. The Dancing Houses are a regular tourist attraction and a highlight of Amsterdam. 

Amsterdam’s tap water is safe to drink 

Amsterdam’s tap water is the cleanest in the Netherlands. Above this, the Netherlands has the cleanest tap water in Europe. 

Amsterdam is home to famous museums

Not only is Amsterdam home to some of the most famous museums in the world, but it also has more museums per square meter than any other city. Famous figures, such as Anne Frank and Van Gough, have museums in Amsterdam, alongside the Rijksmuseum and the Amsterdam museum.

Image by emoro from Pixabay

Amsterdam’s floating flower market 

The Netherlands is well known for its flowers, specifically tulips. The iconic floating flower market of Amsterdam has been in business since 1862. It is now one of the most famous flower markets in the Netherlands. To this day, all the stalls of the market are located on boats as a remembrance to when flowers were delivered to the Netherlands by boat. 

Image by jimderda

Amsterdam’s tourists drastically outweigh its locals

Amsterdam is visited by roughly 14 million tourists per year. 4.5 million of these tourists travel from the Netherlands, with the rest travelling from around the globe. Amsterdam is home to only 821,000 residents, meaning that the tourists drastically outnumbers the locals. 

Another fun fact about Amsterdam is that Laundryheap operates from the city. If you are visiting Amsterdam and need your clothes laundered you can book your slot via the Laundryheap website or on the app. 


1 Comment

Visiting Dubai: The Do’s and Do Not’s

Dubai is a city known for being technologically and architecturally advanced, yet it is incredibly traditional and religious. That is why we have made this guide of Do’s and Do Not’s for your visit to Dubai.

Do

  • Dress respectfully 
  • Take taxis
  • Drink tap water 
  • Leave the city 
  • See the Burj Khalifa

Dress respectfully

Dubai is a traditional Islamic city so dressing conservatively is highly advised. It’s suggested that women wear loose-fitting dresses and skirts, and men trousers and jeans coupled with long sleeve tops. However, just because you have to dress conservatively, it doesn’t mean you can’t dress fashionably. Dubai is one of the capital cities of fashion, where men and women alike love to experiment with colours, fabrics, and patterns. So, be fashion-forward with your conservative attire. 

Take taxis 

Taxi services in Dubai are reasonably priced and a great way to escape the heat and travel around the city. Additionally, if you are planning a wild Dubai night out, it’s best to plan to get to the club via taxi. It’s an offence in Dubai to be seen on the street intoxicated and could lead to a fine or even a month in prison. Better to be safe and book your taxi to and from the club than risk a prison sentence. 

Image by Fabio Achilli

Drink tap water 

Despite popular debate, it is safe to drink tap water in Dubai, so give it a taste. If you are still dubious, there are hotels that will import bottled water from Europe, however, due to the lack of environmental sustainability importation promotes, drinking imported water should be avoided. Instead, ask for locally sourced bottled water to avoid the harm to the environment and avoid the tap. 

Leave the city 

Dubai is a beautiful cosmopolitan city, but there is a lot to explore just outside the city walls. Take a trip to the desert one day and experience life beyond the city of Dubai. Desert safari experiences can be bought at a range of prices, and often involve a camel ride. Go wild for a day and return to the civilisation of the city later on. 

Image by alfonso venzuela

See the Burj Khalifa 

No Dubai trip is complete without seeing the Burj Kalifa. Standing 829 meters tall, the Burj Kalifa is the tallest building in the world and an architectural sight to behold. You can pay to see Dubai from the buildings viewing platform 555 meters up, or be shadowed by the building as you observe it, for free, from below. Either way, your trip to Dubai will not be complete without visiting this spectacular structure. 

Don’t

  • Wear swimwear away from the water
  • Take photos of government buildings 
  • Eat or drink in public during Ramadan 
  • Engage in PDA
  • Make big plans on a Friday

Wear swimwear away from the water 

As previously discussed, Dubai has a conservative dress code; this code also applies to swimwear. When at the beach or a pool it is completely acceptable to wear any form of swimwear that you desire. However, as soon as you step out of the water, you must be conscious of your clothing and consider throwing on a dress or shirt over your swimwear. 

Image by Sakena

Take photos of government buildings

Regardless of where you go on holiday you always want to take a few snaps for the memories. Dubai is home to some of the most extraordinary modern-day buildings that, undoubtedly, need to be caught on camera. This being said, be mindful not to capture any government buildings as, for security reasons, this is strictly prohibited.  

Image by Michael Theis

Eat or drink in public during Ramadan 

During the 9th month of the Islamic calendar, Muslims will take part in Ramadan where they will fast during daylight hours. If you are visiting Dubai during Ramadan the locals won’t expect you to take part in the festival, however, you must be respectful towards those who are. If you want to eat and drink during daylight hours there are a handful of cafes and restaurants that stay open, however, you’re options will be limited. Alternatively, you can eat and drink in your room until the sun goes down. 

Image by George Shahda

Engage in PDA 

Public Displays of Affection (PDA) are a strong offense in Dubai. Everything from a kiss on the cheek to hugging in public is considered indecent. At a push, a married couple may hold hands, but even that is pushing the boundaries of acceptability. To avoid causing offense, it’s best to save showering your other half in affection until you return to your hotel room.  

Make big plans on a Friday 

Friday is considered a holy day in Dubai and is therefore not for working. Don’t worry, the whole city doesn’t grind to a halt, but you should expect there to be a limited number of amenities open. Bear this in mind when planning your Dubai trip and consider having a beach day on Friday. 

Image by Dr. Norbert Heidenbluth

Whatever you’re plans are in Dubai, do make sure that you use Laundryheap for all your holiday laundering needs and do not miss out on the opportunity to enjoy your trip in the freshest smelling clothes.