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Fun facts about Kuwait City

Photo by Shahbaz Hussain Shah from Pexels

Kuwait City is the capital of the Arab country, the State of Kuwait. It is the third richest country in the Middle East, and home to 4,420,110 people.

  • The name Kuwait City
  • Hot city
  • The Liberation Tower
  • Text savvy 
  • Gigantic banner
  • Not so fast food
  • Soap operas
  • Economy
  • Sports
  • Theatre

The name Kuwait City

The name Kuwait City derives from the Arabic meaning, ‘fortress city built by water.’ The city lies on Kuwait Bay, a natural deep-water harbour, where 90% of Kuwait’s population live. 

Photo by SenuScape from Pexels

Hot city 

In the summer, Kuwait City is one of the hottest cities on earth. The average summer temperature is 45 degrees celsius. The hot desert climate of the city creates prolonged summers and short winters. In addition to the excruciating heat, sand storms frequently occur during the summer months from the Shamal wind. 

The Liberation Tower 

The Liberation Tower, is a 372-meter high telecommunication tower that stands in the middle of Kuwait City. It is the fifth tallest telecommunication tower in the world, the 39th tallest building in the world, and is over 10% taller than the Eiffel Tower. 

Text savvy 

On the 1st of March 2012, the Guinness Book of World Records recognised Kuwait City as the place where the fastest prescribed 160-character text message was sent. 

Photo by Porapak Apichodilok from Pexels

Gigantic banner

The Guinness Book of World Records returned to Kuwait City in 2018, when the record was set for the largest banner to be flown behind a vehicle. The banner measured 4,690 square feet, and was flown behind a vehicle as part of celebrating 100 years since the launch of Chevrolet trucks. 

Not so fast food

When McDonald’s opened in Kuwait City, the drive-through line was, at times, 7 miles long.

Soap operas 

Kuwait soap operas are amongst the most popular in the Arab world. Most of the Gulf soap operas are based in Kuwait and performed using Kuwait dialect. Some of these soap operas are popular in places as far as Tunisia. 

Photo by Nothing Ahead from Pexels

Economy

Kuwait is a petroleum-based economy. Petroleum and fertilizer are Kuwaits main exports. Petroleum accounts for 90% of export revenues and government income in Kuwait. 

Sports 

Kuwait City is home to the Al Kuwait SC, one of Kuwait’s professional basketball teams. The club regularly competes in the Kuwait Division 1 Basketball League, and has provided Kuwait’s national basketball team with some of it’s top players.  

Photo by Markus Spiske from Pexels

Theatre

Kuwait is the only Arab country in the Persian Gulf region that has a theatre tradition. The theatrical movement in Kuwait constitutes a major part of the country’s Arabic cultural life. Kuwait’s theatre tradition began in the 1920’s when the first spoken dramas were released. 

Photo by Monica Silvestre from Pexels

If you are residing in the Kuwait City area, let Laundryheap take care of your laundry for you. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to book your service. 


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Manama travel guide

Manama is bursting with exquisite cuisine, nightlife, and culture, making it the perfect holiday destination. 

  • Temperature
  • Visa and passport requirements
  • How to get to Manama
  • Popular neighbourhoods
  • Currency
  • Must-see sights
  • Top delicacies
  • Shopping locations
  • Nightlife

Temperature

Manama has a desert climate, with the average yearly temperature reaching 26 degrees Celsius. The summer months are particularly brutal, as temperatures can reach as high as 50 degrees Celsius. In the winter, the temperature is considerably cooler, with temperatures ranging between 14 and 20 degrees. The spring and autumn months are more pleasant with temperatures averaging between 20 and 30 degrees Celsius. 

Image by Jacobs – Creative Bees

Visa and passport requirements 

If you are travelling to Manama as a United Arab Emirates national, you will not need a visa, but you will need to have your National ID Card. 

It’s best to check with your respective embassy whether you need a visa before visiting Manama.

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How to get to Manama 

To reach Manama, you can fly in to Bahrain International Airport. The airport is directly connected to major international destinations, such as New York, Mumbai, London, and Singapore

If you can’t fly into Bahrain International Airport, the King Fahd International Apirport is 53mks from Manama. 

Once you have landed, there are a number of taxi services available to take you into the city. Taxis can be expensive, so if you are looking for a cheaper option, the Saudi-Bharani Transport company run 8 buses daily into central Manama. Alternatively, if you have an international driving permit, you can hire a car and drive yourself into, and around, the city.

Photo by SevenStorm JUHASZIMRUS from Pexels

Popular neighbourhoods

Adliya is the central neighbourhood in Manama. It is where you will find the best restaurants and bars, so if you are looking for nightlife, it is the best place to start. 

Alternatively, Seef District, is located near the water front of Manama. There are an array of excelled restaurants to be found in the area, as well as Seef Mall and other shopping complexes. 

Amwaj Island sits in the Persian Gulf. It is a man-made island that comes complete with a water park and several shopping malls. It is the perfect neighbourhood for those on a family holiday. 

Currency

The local currency in Manama is Bahraini Dinars (BD). You can find BD in the form of 1,5,10, and 20 Dinar notes, or 5,10, 25, and 50 fils. 

Credit cards are widely used in Manama, however the local souq will only accept cash, so it is advised to buy Dinars beforehand. 

Must-see sights  

There are an abundance of incredible things to see and do in Manama, one of which is to visit the Manama Souk. It is a famous flea market, and the best place to buy gold, clothes, jewellery, and souvenirs. 

To get a better understanding of Bahrain and it’s culture, head to the heritage centre and explore its collection of traditional clothes and photographs. 

For the animal lovers, Bahrain’s Royal Camel Farm is a must-see. At the farm you will see, feed, and pet thousands of camels. 

If you are a thrill-seeker, visit Coral Bay. There, you can try a variety of water sports, from jet skiing to water skiing. Alternatively, you can take a relaxing boat trip across the Bay to soak in the sun and sea.

Top delicacies 

You can find a smorgasbord of delicacies in Manama, including kaboo, hot bread, and bharat, a mixture of local spices that is heavily used in many Manama dishes. The local fish include halibut, chimaera, mackerel, and bream. For those who are vegetarian, you can enjoy balls of falafel, hummus, and baba ghanoush. 

Photo by Polina Tankilevitch from Pexels

Shopping locations

The best place to shop in Manama is the Bab Al Bahrain souk district. You can find hundreds of stalls here, selling everything you would ever want. From flowers to spices, carpets to fruits, there is a vast array of souvenirs that can be found within the souk. 

If you are looking for gold, head to the Gold Souk. Here you will find jewellery, diamonds, watches, and, of course, gold. You can even trade in your old gold items for new ones. 

Moda Mall is where you will find all the best designer shops. Located on the ground floor of the World Trade Centre, you will find 160 international designer stores, including Armani, Versace, Louis Vuitton, and Christian Dior. Once you’ve finished shopping, you can relax and refuel at one of the many restaurants located within the mall. 

Nightlife 

Manama has a very vibrant nightlife. Whether you are looking to relax in a bar after a long day of sight-seeing, or are eager to party the night away at a club, you will find both within the city. 

There are several bars within Manama, the most popular of which offer outdoor seating. For the best bars, head to Block 338 in Adlliya. If you are looking for a quite drink, be warned that a lot of bars will turn up their music for more of a party vibe after 11pm. 

If a party vibe is what you are looking for, Manama has plenty of nightclubs to be enjoyed. Whether you want to listen to Western music, such as dance, pop, and hip hop, or Arabic music, there is something for all demographics. 

Photo by Mark Angelo from Pexels

Manama is a city that should be enjoyed to its fullest, which is why, whilst you are exploring, we will take care of your laundry. 

To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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How to get laundry done in a quarantine hotel

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You’ve arrived back in the UK, lugging your suitcase, and you’re immediately told that you must isolate for 10 days in a quarantine hotel. You will be provided with 3 meals a day, WIFI, and regular COVID tests. What won’t be provided, is a way for you to wash your clothes. How are you going to get your laundry done? 

  • In the sink 
  • Through the hotel 
  • Laundryheap

In the sink 

To wash your smaller items of clothing, such as t-shirts and underwear, you can use your quarantine hotel room bathroom sink. Before doing so, check with your hotel that you can have access to some form of laundry detergent. 

To hand-wash your clothes, fill your bathroom sink with warm water, and add the laundry detergent.

Place your items in the water, you may have to do this one item at a time depending on how big your sink is, and use a plunging motion to wash them. 

Once you are satisfied with the cleanliness of your items, rinse them with warm water. Make sure that you thoroughly rinse your clothing or you could be left with laundry detergent lingering in your garments. 

After rinsing your clothing, hang it over the shower and leave it to air dry. This could take some time depending on the warmth of your room and how many items you are trying to dry at once. 

Photo by ato de from Pexels

Through the hotel 

Some quarantine hotels may offer an in-house laundry service, at an additional cost. It is likely that a laundry service will only be available at certain times, so you will have to adjust your schedule accordingly. There is no guarantee that your quarantine hotel will offer a laundry service, so it is best to check before hand. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Laundryheap

Laundryheap is an on-demand laundry and dry-cleaning service. We will pick-up your laundry from your quarantine hotel, launder it, and have it re-delivered to you within 24 hours. We are fast, flexible, and efficient.

Our number one priority throughout the COVID 19 pandemic continues to be keeping our customers and partner drivers safe. That is why we offer a hot wash service, at no additional cost, and all of our deliveries are contactless. 

At Laundryheap, we understand that this is a scary time, and that having to quarantine in a hotel for 10 days is not easy. That is why we are here to help you get through it, with fresh clothes. 

Booking your Laundryheap order could not be simpler. You can head to our website, or download the free Laundryheap app from the App Store or Google Play Store. 


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Top places to visit in Boston

Boston is the capital city of Massachusetts. It is overflowing  with history and culture for you to explore at your leisure. 

  • Boston Common
  • Freedom Trail 
  • Faneuil Hall
  • Boston waterfront 
  • Boston Public Library 
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
  • Boston Museum of Fine Art 
  • Fenway Park 
  • The North End 
  • Museum of Science

Boston Common 

Boston Common can be found right in the heart of the city. It is America’s oldest park and is used by tourists and locals all year round. From November to mid-March you can rent skates and go ice skating on the Frog Pond. In the Spring months, you can watch blossoms bloom, and, in the summer, enjoy splashing around in the wading pool.

Adjoining the park, is the 24-acre Public Garden, America’s oldest botanical garden. It is here, that you can experience one of Boston’s most iconic experiences- sailing across the lake in Swan Boats, established in the 1870s. 

Freedom Trail 

Boston Common is also the beginning of the Freedom Trail- a three-mile trail that leads you to 16 of Boston’s historic monuments and sites. To follow the trail, simply keep to the red bricks on the sidewalk and footprints at the street crossings. 

You will begin your trail at Boston Common, where you can pick up brochures about each site you will be visiting at the Visitor Centre. From Boston Common, you can visit the State House, before moving on to the Old Granary Burying Ground, King’s Chapel Burying Ground, and the Old State House. 

The Boston Freedom Trail is the perfect way to learn a brief history of Boston, and America, in one day. 

Faneuil Hall

Faneuil Hall was built in 1740 as a market hall. It was presented to the city of Boston, under the condition that it would always be open to the public. On the ground floor, you can browse market stalls that spill over into the adjoining Faneuil Hall Marketplace, founded in the early 19th century. Here, you will find an abundance of shops, restaurants, and exhibitions. If the weather is nice, you may also find buskers and street performers in the square around the market. 

The second floor of Faneuil Hall is home to a council chamber where, in the 18th and 19th centuries, revolutionaries met. Above this chamber, you can explore the Ancient and Honourable Artillery Museum, which showcases an array of weaponry, uniforms, and paintings from significant battles.

Boston waterfront   

If you are looking for a spectacular view of the Boston city skyline, then head to the Boston waterfront. When you reach the waterfront, you can take a stroll along the harbour, currently 38 miles long, and take in the wonderful view of the city. The best way to experience the Boston waterfront, is by starting at the New England Aquarium and following the walk to the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse. Make sure you have your camera ready, because you won’t want to leave without a photo or two. 

Boston Public Library 

The Boston Public Library, founded in 1848, was the first publicly funded lending library in America. As you venture inside, you will find Renaissance Revival architecture and murals by John Singer Sargent and Edwin Abbey, granite medallions over the entrance arches, and three sets of bronze doors in the vestibule. It is one of the most beautiful buildings in Boston. 

Once you have admired inside the Boston Public Library, admire it on the outside by enjoying a picnic on the grassy lawn. You can relax amongst a strange mixture of old and new buildings, which tower over you in perfect harmony. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a must-visit for fans of modern and postmodern architecture. Spread across 150 acres, you can explore the works of noted architects, such as Alvar Aalto, Eduardo Catalano, I. M. Pei, Frank Gehry, and Eero Saarinen. Littered around the museum are sculptures and installations by artists such as Pablo Picasso and Henry Moore, all which can be viewed with the help of a self-guided walking tour map. There is plenty to see at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Boston Museum of Fine Art  

Nestled within the Boston Museum of Fine Art you will find impressionist paintings, Asian and Persian fine art, and ancient art from Greece and the Middle East. Recently, the museum has expanded to house an array of American art, laid out in chronological order. In this wing you will find American paintings, furniture, decorative arts, folk art, silver, glassware, and design dating from pre-Columbia. You don’t have to be a lover of fine art to find something of interest in this vast museum. 

Fenway Park 

Home to the Boston Red Sox, Fenway Park is known as America’s Most Loved Ballpark. First opened on the 20th of April 1912, not a lot has changed in the century it has been opened. As you tour the park, you can observe some of it’s classic features, such as the hand-operated scoreboard. Don’t forget to get a picture of the Green Monster, Fenway Park’s 37-foot green wall that you can find in left field. Even if you aren’t a sports fan, you will find a tour of the quirky Fenway Park interesting. 

The North End 

North End is one of Boston’s oldest neighbourhoods. It is where silversmith and activist leader Paul Revere lived during the American Revolution. The house that he lived in at the time, situated in North End, is open to tour, as is the Old North Church, where lanterns were lit  in April 1775 to alert Paul Revere that British troops were headed to Lexington to arrest the patriot leaders and confiscate the munitions supplies.

The North End is Boston’s Italian neighbourhood and, asides from the historical importance of the site, is the best spot to find Italian restaurants, cafes, and bakeries. 

Museum of Science

You will find 700 permanent -hands-on exhibits at the Museum of Science. From physics and biology, to zoology and astronomy, no matter what your science interest is, you will find it at the museum. Just some of the highlights include a 65-million-year-old fossil, butterfly garden, and the planetarium which has daily laser and star shows. This museum is the perfect opportunity to explore science in the most interactive and engaging way possible.

Whilst you’re busy exploring the many sites of Boston, let us take care of your laundry. Book your Laundryheap service and we will pick-up, dry clean, and re-deliver your laundry to you within 24 hours. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the Laundryheap app, to book your service. 


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Top things to see in Doha

Doha is the capital city of Qatar. Encased within the city is an abundance of cultural, historical, and fun things to see. 

  • Souq Waqif
  • Museum of Islamic Art 
  • MIA park 
  • 7 by Richard Serra 
  • Qatar National library 
  • Banana Island 
  • Katara Beach 
  • Aspire Park 
  • Pearl Monument 
  • Golden Mosque

Souq Waqif 

Souq Waqif is the social heart of Doha. It’s built on an ancient market site where, centuries ago, sheep, goat, and wool were traded. Nowadays, the market site has been redeveloped to look like that same 19th-century souq, complete with mud-rendered shops and exposed timber beams. The shops you will find here are like museums. You will find swords, shipping memorabilia, and jewellery from the Arab world.

Many of the stalls at Souq Waqif close at 1 pm and re-open at 4 pm, however, if you want to stay in the area, there are many restaurants and cafes that are open all day. 

Museum of Islamic Art 

The Museum of Islamic Art has the largest collection of Islamic art in the world. Spread over the first and second floors of the museum are the permanent collections, including textiles, ceramics, and enamel work. Downstairs, you will find a café and museum shop, and on the top floor you can dine in the IDAM restaurant. 

The museum itself was designed by IM Pei, the same architect of the Louvre in Paris. It is shaped like a post-modern fortress, with minimal windows that reduce energy use, and incredible views across the water.  

MIA Park 

After you have visited the Museum of Islamic Art, head to the MIA Park. It is one of the most beautiful parks in Doha, with breath-taking views of the Doha waterfront. Within the park, you can find food trucks to feast from, a child’s play area, and a 1km pathway around the park. As well as enjoying the general splendour of the park, there are an abundance of events that are put on seasonally, including weekend markets, an outdoor cinema, and fitness sessions. 

7 by Richard Serra 

Nestled within MIA Park you can find 7 by Richard Serra. 7 is a steel sculpture, made from 7 steel plates that stand 24 meters high. Visitors can walk through the sculpture, and gaze up at the Doha skyline from inside. 7 is the first of 2 installations by Richard Serra to be commissioned by the Qatar Museums Authority. 

Qatar National Library 

If you’re looking for a quiet space amongst the hustle and bustle of Doha, you will find it at the Qatar National Library. Nestled within a spaceship-like building, you will find 2 million books, some dating back to as early as the 15th century. Choose a book of your liking, and relax in one of the many egg chairs dotted around the library. Alternatively, you can work at any of the workstations available, or relax in the cafeteria-style restaurant. If you are visiting the library with children, there is a children’s library that is guaranteed to keep them entertained. 

Banana Island 

Banana Island is a tropical paradise. The crescent shape of the island is covered with 800m of golden sand, tropical plants and greenery, and is surrounded by crystal waters. Asides from the beautiful beach of Banana Island, there are six restaurants to dine at. After you’ve fuelled your body, you can enjoy one of the many activities on offer, including Segway rides, beach diving, and bowling. You can reach the island via catamaran. 

Katara Beach 

Katara Beach is a 1.5km beach that is a stone’s throw away from the city of Doha. You can wander across soft sand, swim in the crystal blue water, or take part in the variety of water sports on offer, including parasailing and wakeboarding. If you are enjoying the beach with children, there is an inflatable play structure that will offer endless hours of entertainment.

Be aware that women will not be allowed to swim unless completely covered, and men must not wear speedos. 

Image by Jaseem Hamza

Aspire Park

Covering 88 hectares, Aspire Park is Doha’s largest park. It is home to extensive fields, running tracks, a children’s play park, and exercise equipment. You will also find the only lake in Doha nestled within the park, where you can see many birds, ducks, and geese cooling off. Throughout the year there are festivals, fun runs, and exercise classes put on. 

Pearl Monument  

Before Qatar found oil, pearling was one of the countries most profitable industries. Today, pearls are a significant emblem for the country. You can find the Pearl Monument at the entrance to the dhow harbour. The statue and fountain is a very popular spot for tourist photos, and comes complete with a spectacular view of the city. 

Golden Mosque

Doha’s Golden Mosque is one of the most striking things you will see on your trip. It is an Ottoman-style Mosque that is covered in thousands of golden tiles that shimmer in the sun. Only practicing Muslims can venture inside, however, even if you can’t go indoors, it is worth seeing from the outside. 

Doha has an array of beautiful things to see, and you wouldn’t want to miss out on any of it because of your laundry. Book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Fun facts about Abu Dhabi

Photo by Iva Prime from Pexels

Abu Dhabi is the capital of the United Arab  Emirates. When translated from Arabic, Abu Dhabi means, “Father of the Gazelle.” Here are 10 more fun facts about Abu Dhabi. 

  • Designed by a Japanese architect
  • The Yas Marina Circuit 
  • Living on renewable resources
  • The Capital Gate Building
  • Ferrari World 
  • Humpback dolphins
  • The world’s largest desert 
  • And the world’s largest carpet
  • Air-conditioned bus stops 
  • The safest city in the world

Designed by a Japanese architect

Abu Dhabi’s beautifully modern design is down to Japanese architect Katsuhiko Takahashi. In 1967, Sheikh Zayed, who was president at the time, proposed a revamping of the city to modernise it. Katsuhiko Takahashi worked closely with Sheikh Zayed to design the city, and helped spearhead the project, until the Abu Dhabi we see today was built. Initially, the city was only supposed to house 40,000 people. Today, 1.48 million people inhabit the city. 

The Yas Marina Circuit 

The Yas Marina Circuit, where the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix is held, is estimated to have cost AED 3.6 billion to construct. The 5.55 km track covers 21 hectares, has 21 turns, and can be split into 2 separate tracks so that 2 races can be simultaneously hosted. It is hailed as the most technologically advanced circuit in the world. 

Living on renewable resources

Masdar City, a planned city project in Abu Dhabi, will be the world’s first fully sustainable city. Set to be completed in 2030, the city will be powered by renewable energy sources, and be home to 50,000 people. A field of 22-hectares holds 87,777 solar panels, which will provide energy for the city. It will not completely carbon-neutral, which was the original aim, but, it will set an example to all cities across the world. 

The Capital Gate Building 

The Capital Gate Building stands 35 stories high and has over 16,000 square meters of office space. It leans at an 18-degree angle, which makes it the furthest leaning building in the world. It is commonly known as the Leaning Tower of Abu Dhabi, as it leans 14 degrees more than the Leaning Tower of Pissa. 

Ferrari World  

Opened in 2010, Ferrari World is a theme park dedicated to the luxury sports car of the same name. As you walk from ride to ride there are banners that explain how Ferrari started and how the car rose to fame. Each ride at the park is a thrill, and you can expect to encounter every twist, turn, and high speed that you would expect from a Formula One race. The main event is ‘Formula Rossa’. Hailed as the world’s fastest rollercoaster, it covers 2.2 km and reaches speeds of over 240 kmph. It is certainly a ride for thrill-seekers. 

Humpback dolphins

The coastal waters of Abu Dhabi provide favourable conditions for the Indian humpback dolphin. It is estimated that 2,000 humpback dolphins roam the waters of Abu Dhabi, which is the most significant number of these aquatic mammals that can be found anywhere in the world. Asides from Abu Dhabi, you can find the Indian humpback whale in South Africa, Kenya, and Mozambique. 

By Mandy – Dolphin Following Dhow, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29092883

The world’s largest desert 

Abu Dhabi thrives amongst the world’s largest contiguous desert, known as the Empty Quarter Desert. Spanning over 1,000 km, the terrain is covered by sand dunes of a reddish-orange colour. The daily average temperature of the Empty Quarter Desert is 47 degrees, so the fauna found is limited to arachnids and rodents. 

And the world’s largest carpet 

In the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, the largest carpet in the world can be found. It spreads roughly 60,570 square feet and weighs 35 tons. Taking over a year to complete, it took the work of over a thousand weavers to create this masterpiece. When the mosque opened, it was not only home to the largest carpet in the world, but also the largest chandelier. Unfortunately, this title has changed, but it still holds the title of the largest chandelier in a mosque. 

Air-conditioned bus stops 

The average temperature in Abu Dhabi is 29.6 degrees, meaning that the city can become incredibly hot and uncomfortable. To combat this, air-conditioned bus stops have begun to pop-up across the city. These bus stops are fitted with air conditioning, seats, and top to bottom see-through glass panes, that help travellers stay cool on their journeys.   

The safest city in the world 

Abu Dhabi was ranked the safest city in the world in 2018, 2019, and 2020. In 2018, they won the title with 86.46 points out of 100. This score was topped the year after when they achieved 88.26 points. In 2020, Abu Dhabi managed to hold onto its title. The ranking is based on user feedback who reported how serious they felt crime was in the city, how safe they feel, and whether they have concerns about being attacked due to discrimination. 

If you are living, working, or traveling around Abu Dhabi, don’t let laundry get in the way. Book a Laundryheap dry cleaning service, and we will sort it for you. 

To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Things to do in The Hague

The Hague is the third-largest city in the Netherlands, just behind Amsterdam and Rotterdam. There is no shortage of things to do in The Hague, but we have narrowed it down to the top 10.  

  • Escher in Het Paleis
  • Madurodam
  • Mauritshuis Museum 
  • Drievliet
  • Peace Palace
  • The Hague Tower
  • Landgoed Clingendael Park
  • Explore the canals 
  • Scheveningen
  • Haagse Markt 

Escher in Het Paleis 

If you are a fan of art and maths, then the Escher in Het Paleis is the perfect place for you. During the 20th century, Dutch artist M.C. Escher would apply mathematics and geometry to his graphic art, creating masterpieces with beautiful symmetry. What was once a royal palace, is now a museum dedicated to his work, showcasing over 150 of his most famous pieces. In addition to exploring Escher’s wonderful artwork, the second floor of the museum has been converted into an interactive, optical illusion experience, which allows visitors to see through Escher’s eyes. Escher in Het Paleis is opened 11 am-5 pm Tuesday-Sunday. 

Madurodam 

Madurodam is a miniature park that offers a unique way to explore the history of Holland. The park is divided into 3 sections- City Centre, Water World, and Innovation Island. In the City Centre, you can begin by exploring how Holland developed into the country we see today. Water World, showcases the port of Rotterdam and explains how the famous watermills of Holland work. Finally, Innovation Island showcases modern-day Holland, and all it has to offer. Once you have explored the past and present of Holland, there are an array of play parks and gardens to enjoy.

Mauritshuis Museum 

The Mauritshuis Museum is a cultural must when visiting The Hague. It is home to the most extraordinary collection of Dutch Golden Age paintings, including ‘The Girl With The Pearl Earring’ by Johannes Vermeer. You can wander the museum at your own leisure, or take part in the array of activities that are on offer. On Monday’s, a short talk is given by a member of staff discussing a particular painting, artist, or subject. In addition, there are monthly art lectures and various learning opportunities for children to explore the world of art. 

Drievliet

Whether you are exploring the park with family, or looking for a thrilling adventure, you will find plenty of rides to satisfy your needs at Drievliet. Included in the park are 20 rides that all the family can enjoy, and 5 deluxe rollercoasters, guaranteed to set your hair on edge. Once you are satisfied with your thrill-seeking experience, you can enjoy one of the family-friendly entertainment shows that are put on at Drievliet. 

Peace Palace 

The Peace Palace is why The Hague is known as the City of Peace and Justice. It was built at the end of the 19th century and established as the home for the Permanent Court of Arbitration, where alternative solutions to war between countries could be discussed. Now, you can visit the Peace Palace and join a 90-minute tour of the premises. As you are on your tour, take note of the various pieces of artwork that decorate the hallways. Each piece was gifted by various city governments. 

The Hague Tower 

Standing 132m tall, The Hague Tower is the third tallest building in The Hague. The majority of the building is made up of offices, however, further up the tower is a nightclub, restaurant, and viewing platform. From the viewing platform you can enjoy panoramic views of The Hague. You can even see boats come in from the North sea at the Hook of Holland. This is the perfect opportunity to see the whole of The Hague at one time.

Landgoed Clingendael Park

The Clingendael is a 17th century manor house which is surrounded by exquisite gardens. One of the stand-out features is it’s Japanese garden, although it is only open for a short period of the year due to it’s fragility. The Japanese garden was created at the beginning of the 20th century by the former owner of the manor house, Marguerite M. Baroness van Brienen. She had sailed to Japan on multiple occasions, and bought back lanterns, a water cask, sculptures, and several plants. It is the only Japanese garden in The Netherlands. 

Other than the Japanese garden, The Clingendael has an abundance of green space to enjoy picnics and relaxing days in the sun. There is even a large playground for the little ones. 

Explore the canals 

The Hague is home to 10 canals which were dug in the 14th century for transportation and defence purposes. In the 20th century, these canals were filled to improve sanitation. It wasn’t until 2004 that part of The Hague’s canal system was uncovered for people to sail or walk along. Sailing down the canals of The Hague requires payment, however, walking across them is completely free. 

Scheveningen

The beaches of The Hague is what sets it apart from other Dutch cities. You can spend your morning strolling across the canals, and be at the beach by the afternoon. The largest beach in The Hague is Scheveningen. Scheveningen is best known for its pier, which opened in 1959, but was sadly destroyed during World War 2. It was later renovated in 2015, and now includes a shopping centre. At the end of the pier is a 50 meter high Ferris Wheel from which you can enjoy panoramic views of the sea, and the skyline of The Hague. 

Haagse Markt 

Haagse Markt is the largest outdoor market in Europe, and the place to enjoy the multicultural side of The Hague. Although this market does sell goods, such as flowers, clothes, and household goods, it is best known for its array of food. As you walk from market stall to market stall you can sample the cuisine of the Dutch, Germans, Turkish, and Caribbean, all in one place.

Whilst you are exploring all that The Hague has to offer, we will take care of your laundry. Simply book your Laundryheap service, and we will do the rest.

To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website, or, download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Top places to eat in Dublin

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Dublin is home to an array of exquisite cuisine. These are just a handful of our favourite restaurants.

  • The Greenhouse
  • Clanbrassil House
  • Michael’s
  • Bunsen
  • Dublin Pizza Company
  • The Legal Eagle
  • Fish Shop 
  • The Market Kitchen
  • The Fumbally 
  • Meet Me In The Morning

The Greenhouse 

The Greenhouse, is a 2 Michelin star restaurant that specialises in elevated Irish cuisine. Each season brings a new menu, as only the best Irish produce is used to create an incredible dining experience. If you are going to The Greenhouse for dinner, Expect to pay around €80 for a 3 course meal. If you head to The Greenhouse for lunch you can enjoy a two course meal for €45.

Clanbrassil House

There are only 25 seats at Clanbrassil House, which aids in the homely feel that it offers. Here, you will find ingredient-driven food, cooked over a charcoal fire. Clanbrassil House has fast become a firm favourite amongst Dubliners, with their hash brown chips and pickled onion mayo being said to be unmissable. If you are an indecisive eater you may want to visit later in the evening when the menu is reduced, but for a full menu it’s best to make a booking for earlier in the evening.

 Michael’s

Michael’s has a cult-like following amongst Dubliners. Each day owner and head chef, Gaz, hand-picks the best seafood from the local waters, and creates the perfect seafood menu. To accompany the amazing array of seafood, is an exceptional wine list. To get the best of Gaz’s picks, it’s best to go for the surf and turf, which is complemented perfectly with a herby garlic butter. 

Bunsen

If you are craving a burger whilst residing in Dublin, the only place to feel truly satisfied is Bunsen. Your Bunsen meal will see a Black Aberdeen Angus patty laying on a freshly baked burger bun, topped with melted American-style cheese, and fresh deli-style pickles and lettuce. To top off the burger is Bunsen’s special “punch” sauce. Accompanying are freshly made, hand cut, chips. The price at Bunsen is low, but the flavour and satisfaction is incredibly high. 

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Dublin Pizza Company 

If you are looking for a slice of Italy in Dublin, then look no further than the Dublin Pizza Company. The owners of the Dublin Pizza Company flew to Naples to learn the craft of pizza making, however, all of their ingredients are sourced from their back garden. You can grab one of their outstanding pizzas from their hole-in-the-wall store, or head to The Well, a co-working space by day and event space by night. 

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The Legal Eagle 

Located close to the Four Courts, The Legal Eagle is Dublin’s best gastropub. Inside you will find the familiar brick and birch furniture of a regular pub, but will be served classic Irish food in a new and innovative way. If you happen to be in Dublin on a Sunday, don’t miss out on the opportunity to try The Legal Eagle Sunday dinner- slabs of roast beef, accompanied by seasonal vegetables, cauliflower cheese, and topped with gravy. 

Image by William Murphy

Fish Shop 

Husband and wife team Peter Hogan and Jumoke Akintola have created the perfect place to enjoy fish and chips at Fish Shop. Their concise menu includes classic fish and chips and an assortment of small plates, including poached oysters and squid sliders. Accompanying their refined menu is a perfectly paired wine list. Fish Shop is well known in the Dublin area for being one of the best places to enjoy seafood in Ireland. 

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The Market Kitchen 

Located in Temple Bar’s weekly Saturday market, The Market Kitchen is only open on Saturday’s from 9:30 am to 3:30 pm. Each week, Jenny and Patrick McNally produce organic vegetables from their farm. Their daughter, Sara, and business partner, Liadain Kaminski, pair their vegetables with the produce from the surrounding market stalls. The result, is fresh, organic, and homely food that tastes incredible. 

The Fumbally 

The Fumbally began as a falafel shop, furnished with whatever furniture the owners could find in charity shops. Over the years, it has grown into an organic food venture, which includes house ferments, such as cabbage and ginger. Guests still sit at the original mismatched tables, but they have more option on what they can eat. The Fumbally is the perfect place for some casual, organic, food that is good for your body and mind. 

Meet Me In The Morning  

Meet Me In The Morning may look like a small coffee shop serving little more than a few pastries, but their food is a true delight for the taste buds. Their menu is small, however, each dish is made with fresh, organic, vegetables, and a sprinkling of meat. Everything is made fresh that day, and you are guaranteed to leave feeling happy and full. 

Whilst you’re enjoying eating your way around Dublin, we will take care of your laundry. Book your Laundryheap service by visiting the Laundryheap website, or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Top days out in Birmingham

As the second biggest city in the UK, there is an abundance of incredible days out to experience in Birmingham. These are our top 10.

  • Thinktank, Birmingham science museum 
  • Barber Institute of Fine Arts
  • Cadbury World 
  • Black Country Living museum 
  • Botanical gardens 
  • Peaky Blinders tour
  • The Birmingham Bullring 
  • Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park
  • Sea Life Centre
  • Cannon Hill Park

Thinktank, Birmingham science museum

Whether you enter the Thinktank science museum with an interest in science or not, you will certainly leave it astounded by what you’ve seen. Thinktank is an award-winning museum that is home to an eclectic collection of science-related exhibits.

For centuries, Birmingham has been an important industrial centre, and Thinktank showcases many of the machines that helped Birmingham’s industrial growth. Some of the key exhibits include the Spitfire Gallery, the Science Garden, and the Thinktank Planetarium. 

Barber Institute of Fine Arts

The Barber Institute of Fine Arts is home to an exciting collection of Renaissance and 20th-century art. It is located a stone’s throw away from Birmingham University, and includes art from the likes of Botticelli, Bellini, and Monet. You can explore the wonderful collection of artwork at your own pace, or book a guided tour. If you have time, make sure to visit the café and gift shop. 

Cadbury World 

Who wouldn’t want to visit a chocolate factory? Bournville, a short drive from Birmingham, is home to the original Cadbury’s chocolate factory, where the Dairy Milk was formed.

Begin by taking a tour of the factory and learning about the history behind Cadbury’s chocolate. Then, explore Bull Street, a replica street that is reminiscent of the 1820s. Finally, let your inner child come out and enjoy the theme-park-like attractions the park has to offer. 

After fully touring the factory and its grounds, spend some time exploring the picture-perfect village of Bourneville, which was built by the Cadbury family in 1860.

Black Country Living Museum 

As mentioned, Birmingham is an industrial city. Nine-miles west, in the town of Dudley, is the Back Country Living Museum. Set across a 26-acre site, visitors can delve into the history of mining through an old mine shaft and reconstructed, turn-of-the-century, industrial community, consisting of 50 authentic buildings. You can completely immerse yourself in this experience as you take costumed guided tours, travel on a vintage tram, and even enjoy a 19th-century fun fair

Botanical gardens 

You will find Birmingham’s Botanical gardens in the suburb of Edgbaston. Founded in 1829, the Botanical gardens were used to showcase new and exotic plants that had been found around the world. Apart from the greenhouses, which house a number of exotic flora, the layout of Birmingham’s Botanical gardens remains largely the same. The Botanical gardens are beautiful during all seasons, although specifically in the spring/summer months, and are a fantastic way to see an array of exotic flora. 

Peaky Blinders tour 

If you are a fan of the hit BBC drama Peaky Blinders, why not discover the true story of the gang?

You will begin your tour at The Old Crown on Deritend High Street, where you will be met with a welcome drink. There, you will also meet your tour guide, Professor Carl Chinn MBE. Next, you will be taken through the streets of Birmingham, and told the gruesome truth behind Birmingham’s most notorious gang. After your tour, you will feast on a traditional Victorian dinner, which will end with the telling of the Peaky Blinders ultimate demise.

The Birmingham Bullring  

The Birmingham Bullring is the go-to location for all your shopping needs. Connected via a link bridge to Birmingham Grand Central train station, the Bullring is the largest city centre shopping centre in the UK. Established in 1154, the Bullring has historically been the go-to place to shop. What was once a series of market stalls, is now an indoor shopping centre, home to a multitude of shops and restaurants, including one of only four Selfridge’s department stores in the UK. 

Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park 

Birmingham’s Wildlife Conservation Park is home to a unique collection of animals from across the world. Just some of the wildlife you can see include red pandas, lemurs, meerkats, otters, and wallabies. Some of the animals homed at Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park are endangered in the wild, so the park work to breed those animals in an attempt to conserve the species. If you are an avid zoologist or just love animals, Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park is a must-visit. 

Sea Life Centre 

Keeping with the animal theme, if you are a fan of aquatic animals then the Sea Life Centre is the perfect day out. Home to over 60 marine exhibits,  a million-litre ocean tank, and an underwater tunnel, the Sea Life Centre is guaranteed fun for all ages. There are over 2,000 sea creatures that call the centre home, including sea horses, reef sharks, giant turtles, and giant octopi. Birmingham’s Sea Life Centre is a fun, and educational, day out. 

Cannon Hill Park  

If you have visited Birmingham’s Wildlife Conservation Park, you can spend the rest of your day exploring Cannon Hill Park. From fun parks to the land train, Cannon Hill Park is packed with fun family activities. Included in the park are mini-golf, swan boats, the garden tea room, and tennis courts. Whether you’re sporty, competitive, or just want to admire the greenery, Cannon Hill Park has something for everyone to enjoy. 

Whilst you’re enjoying a day-out in Birmingham, let us take care of your laundry. Head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to book your laundry and dry cleaning service.


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New Year’s traditions around the world

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It’s almost time to say goodbye to 2020, and wave hello to 2021. This is how they bring in the new year in the countries we operate in around the world. 

  • UK
  • USA
  • Ireland
  • Denmark 
  • Netherlands
  • UAE 
  • Qatar
  • Kuwait
  • Bahrain
  • Singapore

UK

In the UK, New Year’s Eve is celebrated with friends and family. Often, people will host parties in their homes, go to pubs, or gather for large firework displays that begin as soon as the clock strikes midnight. 

New Year’s Day is considered a day to relax and spend time with family. There is an old British superstition that the first guest to enter a person’s home on New Year’s Day will bring all the luck of the New Year with them. This tradition is called ‘first footing’. 

USA

Every year around 2 million people gather in Time Square, New York City, to witness the ‘ball drop’. The ‘ball drop’ began in 1907, and sees a large ball slowly lowered down a pole until it reaches the bottom as the clock strikes 12. Nowadays, the ball is covered in Waterford crystals, and the ‘ball drop’ is an event that includes musicians and entertainment. For those who can’t make it to New York, the ‘ball drop’ is broadcasted nationally and internationally to one billion people a year. 

Ireland 

Similarly to in the UK, New Year’s Eve in Ireland is often spent with family and friends either at parties, in the pub, or enjoying time together. 

In Ireland, New Year’s Day begins with cleaning the house. It is a centuries-old custom in Ireland to start the new year with a completely clean slate, meaning a spotless house. It is also a tradition to take note of which way the wind is blowing. If the wind is blowing in from the west, then the whole country is in for a good year, however, if it’s blowing in from the east, bad times are ahead. 

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Denmark 

In Denmark, they take ‘leaping into the new year’ to a whole new level. At the stroke of midnight, Danes leap from chairs to enter the new year in high spirits and with good luck. As well as jumping from chairs, Danes also smash plates against their friend’s front doors. This, like chair jumping, is supposed to bring good luck. The more plates you have smashed at your front door the more friends you have. Just be careful when stepping outside.

 Netherlands

On New Year’s Eve, the Dutch celebrate with friends and family, drinking bokbier and glüwein, and setting off fireworks at midnight. 

The next day, 30,000 people brave the freezing cold Dutch sea to enjoy a New Year’s dive. This has been an annual tradition for roughly 50 years, with many participants taking on the challenge to raise money for charity. The biggest of these dives happens outside Den Haag, underneath Scheveningen pier. 

UAE

New Year’s Eve in the United Arab Emirates is grand and luxurious. Many people go out for festive dinners, where entertainers dazzle diners whilst they eat. Alternatively, big parties are held at the best clubs in the UAE, where special guest DJ’s perform. At midnight, a myriad of fireworks, known to be the world’s most expensive fireworks, light the sky to welcome in the New Year. 

Qatar

In Qatar, they don’t view New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day as public holidays, so they don’t usually celebrate them. This being said, because of the tourism in Qatar, there are parties thrown at resorts and firework displays put on at midnight. 

Kuwait

New Years’ is a big time of the year for tourism in Kuwait. There are usually big parties held for tourists and locals alike, with firework displays going off at midnight to welcome in the new year. 

Bahrain 

Bahrain Bay is the best location in Bahrain to be on New Year’s Eve. Throughout the evening there is a host of extravagant feasts laid on at hotels and restaurants. At midnight a grand firework display is set off, followed by an abundance of exclusive parties.

Singapore 

New Year’s Eve in Singapore is centred upon Marina Bay. The focal point of the evening is always the midnight firework show, which is organised by the Urban Redevelopment Authority. 

People in Singapore start their New Year’s Day with a fresh approach. They buy fresh flowers and plants to decorate their homes and often freshly paint their houses. This is supposed to signify a new beginning for the new year. 

With the new year, comes a fresh start, which should be met with freshly laundered clothes. To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.