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Top 5 Copenhagen day trips

Photo by Daniel Jurin from Pexels

Copenhagen is a beautiful city, overflowing with things to do and places to explore. It is also surrounded by wonderful places for day visits. 

  • Helsingør 
  • Odense 
  • The outskirts of Copenhagen
  • Møn
  • Malmö

Helsingør 

The historical city of Helsingør is just an hour train journey from Copenhagen. The city’s most visited attraction is Kronborg Castle, made famous for being the setting of the Shakespeare play Hamlet. You can tour the castle on several routes, both free and payable options available, and immerse yourself in the rich history the castle has to offer. Once you’ve explored Kronborg Castle, wander around Helsingør. Attractions within the city include the Maritime Museum of Denmark, the Culture Yard, and the Danish Museum of Science and Technology. 

Image by Olivier Bruchez

Odense

Hans Christian Anderson is arguably the most famous fairy tale writer in the world. His birthplace of Odense is reachable within an hour, by train, from Copenhagen. As you wander the old cobbled streets you can visit the house where the famous fairy tale writer grew up. Afterwards, take a look around the Hans Christian Anderson House Museum which offers an immersive look into the fairy tales Anderson wrote. Odense has a strong cycling culture, so why not hire a bike to see the sights the city has to offer. There are public bicycle pumps across the city and plenty of bike-designated parking spots for when you want to take a break

Image by Elgaard

The outskirts of Copenhagen

The outskirts of Copenhagen are surrounded by lush forests and water. Hidden amongst this serene setting are six wooden giants for you to find. Created by artist Thomas Dambo, each giant is made from recycled wood which allows the structures to blend seamlessly into their scenic surroundings. Hunting for the six giants is the perfect activity for those who crave adventure and enjoy escaping from urban life. You will need a car to travel to each giant’s location, however, it may be worth doing some additional sightseeing as you journey to each structure. To find the exact location of each giant head to Thomas  Dambo’s website. 

Image by Lars Plougmann

Møn

Just under two hours South of Copenhagen you will find the island of Møn. Home to sweeping sandy beaches, secret coves, and, its main attraction, Møns Klint. Møn is a breath-taking island you may never want to leave. Møns Klint is the 70 million years old chalk cliffs on the island that are gently crumbling into the Baltic Sea, making the water crystal clear. You can view the cliffs, and enjoy the water, by hiring a kayak or fishing boat for the day. Alternatively, you can enjoy a ride on an Icelandic pony or take one of the two mountain bike trails 820km to the top of Møns Klint. 

Image by Image by Jenny Shead from Pixabay 

Malmö

In just 38 minutes you can go from one country to another. Take a quick trip to Malmö Sweden, a charming city full of culture, incredible architecture, and great food. Whilst in Malmö don’t miss out on seeing The Turning Torso, Scandinavia’s tallest building. At the foot of the Turning Torso, you will find a beach and harbour, perfect for a leisurely stroll. After visiting The Turning Torso, head to Malmö Saluhall, a food market overflowing with delicious artisanal goods. Here you can try Fika, the Swedish version of afternoon tea, where you will be served a variety of delicious cakes and coffee

Image by Alex Waltner from Pixabay 

Copenhagen, and its surrounding areas, should be explored to the fullest. Don’t let laundry get in the way, let us do it for you. Head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your laundry and dry cleaning service today.


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Where to shop in Doha

Photo by Kaboompics .com from Pexels

A bit of retail therapy makes every holiday better. If you are visiting Doha, these are the best places to shop. 

  • Souq Waqif
  • Gold Souq
  • Omani Souq
  • Festival City
  • MIA Park Bazaar 
  • The Pearl

Souq Waqif 

Location: Al Souq Street, Doha, Qatar

Opening times: Saturday-Thursday, 7:30 am-12:30 pm and 3:30 pm-10 pm, Friday 12:30 pm-10 pm 

Founded over a century ago, Souq Waqif is one of the oldest Souqs in Qatar. What was once a busy trading centre for camels and livestock is now a labyrinth of market stalls selling spices, textiles, jewellery, and handicrafts. As you wander from stall to stall allow your senses to be taken over by the smells of the spice stalls and the sounds of traditional music.  Despite being open until 10 pm, it is best to visit Souq Waqif either in the early morning or later in the day to avoid the scorching daytime heat.  

Image by Nordcap Studio from Pixabay 

Gold Souq

Location: Al Ahmed Street, Doha, Qatar

Opening times: Saturday–Thursday 9 am-1 pm and 4 pm-10 pm, Friday 4 pm-10 pm

Across the street from Souq Waqif, you will find the Gold Souq. As the name suggests, here you will find finely crafted pieces of gold jewellery and precious gems. Most of the items on sale are 22 carats, however, there are white gold, silver, and platinum pieces available at a slightly cheaper price. From bridal jewellery to souvenirs, the Gold Souq is the best place to shop for all your jewellery needs whilst your visiting Doha

Omani Souq 

Location: Salwa Road, Al Maamoura, Doha, Qatar 

Opening times: Daily, 7 am-10 pm

Omani Souq, in comparison to the Gold Souq and Souq Waqif, is a smaller market, visited more by locals than tourists. Here you will find fresh produce, including fruits and vegetables, Saudi dates, local honey, and an array of vibrant spices. Alongside this fresh produce are clay pots, perfumes, and baskets, which make perfect souvenirs to take home with you. One of the best finds at Omani Souq are white truffles, at an astoundingly low price, which can only be sourced if the desert has had the right amount of rain. 

Photo by Engin Akyurt from Pexels

Festival City 

Location: Al Shamal Road, Umm Salal Mohammed, Doha, Qatar

Opening times: Sunday–Wednesday, 10 am-10 pm, Thursday–Saturday 10 am-midnight

Doha’s Festival City is more than just a shopping experience. This 600,000 square meter shopping mall includes hundreds of shops, over 100 restaurants, plus an Angry Birds park, complete with bumper cars, a trampoline park, and a zip line. If that was not enough, you can cool off from the desert heat on the indoor snow slide and snow-covered hills. Festival City provides the perfect combination of retail therapy and thrilling adventure, all under one roof, and all family-friendly. 

Photo by Artem Beliaikin from Pexels

MIA Park Bazaar 

Location: South of Doha Corniche, Doha, Qatar

Opening times: Friday 2 pm-10 pm, Saturday 12 pm-7 pm, Sunday 12 pm-6 pm

Hosted on the grounds of the Museum of Islamic Art, MIA Park Bazaar is a weekend market that operates from September to April. During this time, as many as 150 market stalls offer both local and international arts, crafts, and culinary creations. Each stall offers unique pieces of handmade art which make for one-of-a-kind souvenirs. After browsing the buzzing stalls, head into the Museum of Islamic Art to observe the impressive collection of art and artefacts from the Muslim world. 

Image by StellarD

The Pearl 

Location: The Pearl-Qatar, Doha, Qatar

If you are looking for a luxury shopping experience then look no further than The Pearl. This artificial island is home to elegant fashion, jewellery, and lifestyle boutiques, as well as celebrity-chef restaurants and cafes. From the marina with its huge yachts bobbing on the water to the shop fronts lining the streets with beautiful window displays, everything about The Pearl screams luxurious. Whether you’re shopping or window shopping it’s a luxury experience you don’t want to miss. 

Image by Steven Byles

Enjoy shopping without having to think about laundry when you book your Laundryheap service. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your order today. 


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Backpacking travel hacks

Photo by Pawan Yadav from Pexels

Backpacking is an extraordinary opportunity full of excitement and adventure. That being said, it can also be stressful and costly. These travel hacks will help to limit the stress that comes with backpacking, and allow you to fully focus on the adventure. 

  • Use private browsing
  • Roll your clothing
  • Buy a portable phone charger
  • Take advantage of credit card offers
  • Stay for free 
  • Adapt your travel style
  • Rely on Wi-Fi
  • Use WhatsApp
  • Download Google Translate 
  • Keep rechargeable batteries in the fridge 

Use private browsing 

When booking any kind of travel, always use private browsing. Travel sites can monitor when you have visited their website and what you have searched for by installing cookies on your browser, which can lead to inflated prices. Using private browsing prevents these sites from monitoring your activity and will guarantee you the best travel prices. 

Photo by Peter Olexa from Pexels

Roll your clothing

Travel backpacks do not have a lot of room, so space-saving techniques are essential. One space-saving technique is to roll your clothing rather than fold. Rolling your clothing will make it much easier to arrange them inside your backpack and will also limit the creases on each garment. Alternatively, you can also use your clothing to wrap up valuables that you want to take with you, such as a camera. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Buy a portable phone charger 

Although there will be places to charge your phone on your travels, there is no guarantee that your phone won’t completely run out of battery before you get there. It is vitally important to have a charged phone with you at all times whilst you are backpacking, so that you can look up directions, book transport, or in case of emergencies. Investing in a portable phone charger is the best way to guarantee that your phone always has a good amount of battery left in it. Just make sure that you remember to charge your portable charger before leaving for the day. 

Photo by ready made from Pexels

Take advantage of credit card offers

There are several credit card companies that offer lucrative deals perfect for backpackers. These can include travel insurance deals, travel points, and allowing you to use your card in multiple different countries without additional charges. Thoroughly research the pros and cons of several different credit card options, and decide whether it is worth signing up for one. You may find it is the easiest option for you. 

Photo by Anete Lusina from Pexels

Stay for free

If you are an avid backpacker you may have made friends and connections in places that you have previously visited. Alternatively, you may be backpacking to a country that you have never visited before but know someone who lives there. Either way, make use of your connections and try and get free accommodation for a few nights. As long as you trust the individual that you are asking to stay with, there is no harm in requesting if you can sleep on their sofa for a couple of nights. It may end up saving you a lot of money. 

Photo by Tim Samuel from Pexels

Adapt your travel style

If you are travelling to different countries, or even different areas of the same country, you will have to adapt your travel style to reflect how pricey the area is. You will find that in some places, such as capital cities, accommodation, food, and activities are more costly than in smaller towns and villages. Before heading to your next destination, do some research. If the area is costly, find free activities and consider staying in a hostel rather than a hotel. If the area you are heading to isn’t as pricey, don’t restrict yourself. Spend a little bit more money on accommodation or eating at a nice restaurant. Backpacking is all about balance. As long as you have enough money to get yourself safely from one location to another, it’s perfectly acceptable to use the rest of your money to treat yourself. 

Photo by Porapak Apichodilok from Pexels

Rely on Wi-Fi 

Some countries you visit will charge you for making calls and sending texts outside of the country. Don’t risk these charges and instead rely on Wi-Fi. Most areas you visit will have places that supply Wi-Fi, such as restaurants, cafes, and hotels. Use these services to stay in touch with friends and family. Wi-Fi is free, so don’t risk any additional charges by using your phones data. 

Photo by Uriel Mont from Pexels

Use WhatsApp

Texting and calling to a phone outside of the country you are in can incur additional charges. Rather than texting or calling, download WhatsApp on your phone and use it to stay in contact with friends and family. WhatsApp is a messaging platform that uses Wi-Fi to keep you connected. You can send messages, phots, videos, and even call other WhatsApp users completely free of charge. Make sure to download the app before you leave and encourage the people you want to stay in touch with to do the same. 

Photo by Alok Sharma from Pexels

Download Google Translate

As you are backpacking you will encounter an array of different languages. Although you may encounter people who speak the same language as yourself, you will have a much more authentic experience of the countries you are visiting if you interact with the locals, including speaking to them in their native language. Download Google Translate so that you can quickly and efficiently translate what people are saying, and form a cohesive response. Overtime you may find yourself picking up phrases and learning parts of the language. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Keep rechargeable batteries in the fridge

It may sound strange to keep batteries in the fridge, but it is incredibly effective. Most rechargeable batteries retain 90% of their full charge when they are kept in cooler temperatures. When you get back from a long day of sightseeing, put your batteries in the fridge overnight and by the time you go out the next day they will be ready to use again. 

Photo by PhotoMIX Company from Pexels

Never run out of clothing whilst you are backpacking. Laundryheap operates internationally, from the UK to the USA, Singapore to Bahrain, you can check if Laundrheap operates in your next backpacking destination by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Top cycling routes in Amsterdam

Photo by Liam Gant from Pexels

There are 881,000 bikes in Amsterdam– more bikes than residents. Cycling is a great way to see the city, and these are the top 5 routes we recommend taking. 

  • Amstel River
  • Zuidoost
  • Haarlem
  • Waterland
  • Flowers of Amsterdam

Amstel River

The Amstel River, named after the 13th century fishing village Amstelredamme,  stretches for 31 kilometres. Cycling down the Amstel River will take you out of Amsterdam and through Ouderkerk aan de Amstel, Nes aan de Amstel, Uithoorn and Waver. Whilst you cycle, look out for the Riekermolen windmill. Built in 1636, it was used to drain the surrounding land, but now stands as a beautiful reminder of a bygone era. You will also pass Rembrandt Hoeve, a farm which specialises in making traditional Netherland clogs and gouda cheese.

Image by karinmuller66 from Pixabay

Zuidoost

When you think of Amsterdam, you picture canals, clogs, and tulips. Cycling through Zuidoost will give you the opportunity to experience a different side to the city. Amsterdam-Zuidoost and Bijlmermeer, simply known as Bijlmer, is home to 100,000 residents of more than 150 ethnic backgrounds, who have created a neighbourhood overflowing with art, culture, and entertainment. As you bike across the neighbourhood, observe the HCC building, a strikingly colourful building which is a living and working place for artists, the multitude of graffiti murals that cover walls across the neighbourhood, and the colourful houses which line the streets. If you get hungry on your travels, stop off at Foodhallen World of Food, where you will find street food from across the world- a true celebration of the different ethnicities that live and work in Bijlmer. 

Image by Henk-Jan van der Klis

Haarlem

Just outside of the urban streets of Amsterdam is the pastoral city of Haarlem. Built during the 10th century, Haarlem holds on to its medieval charm, and yet remains very modern with it’s thriving art scene. Whilst cycling through, make sure that you take a break to explore the city. Visit the Teylers Museum, home to fossils and minerals, as well as a collection of drawings and paintings. Grote Markt is the market square of Haarlem where you can buy a multitude of Netherland delicacies from vendors. Whilst in Grote Markt, don’t miss out on viewing Haarlem City Hall, one of the oldest City Hall’s in the Netherlands. 

Image by Bogdan Migulski

Waterland

The Waterland cycling route begins and ends at Amsterdam Centraal, Amsterdam’s largest train station. This is the perfect cycle route to take to see the traditional villages surrounding Amsterdam, and fall in love with the Netherlands countryside. As you cycle, you will pass a 16th century wooden house on the Buiksloterdijk, giving you a true sense of how the Netherlands was thousands of years ago. Another highlight of the route is the Krijtmolen d’Admiraal, an octagonal smock windmill built in 1792. This cycle route has beautiful landmarks to observe, whilst being incredibly peaceful. Perfect for a Sunday afternoon.

Image by Marcelmulder68

Flowers of Amsterdam

There can only be one flower you think of when you think about the Netherlands- tulips. In 1637, tulips were being sold for more than the price of a luxury Amsterdam home. The flower cycle route begins at the Bloemenmarkt, the world’s only floating flower market, and ends in Aalsmeer, near the largest flower auction in the world where 12 million flowers are sold every day. Along the way, you will have the opportunity to view some of the most beautiful flowers and plants of all time. It will truly be the most scenic bike ride of your life. 

Image by Ricardo Ramírez Gisbert

Whichever cycle route you choose to take, there is no doubt that you will be exhausted after it. Too exhausted to tackle your laundry. Luckily, we’re here to help. Book your Laundryheap order today and we will have your clothing picked up, laundered, and redelivered to you before you even have time to recover from your bike ride. We’ll even wash your biking gear for you. To book your Laundryheap order simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Landmarks of Abu Dhabi

Photo by Kevin Villaruz from Pexels

Abu Dhabi is home to a culture crossover of modern and ancient landmarks. These are our top 10 must-see. 

  • Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque 
  • Etihad Towers 
  • Masdar City
  • Heritage Village
  • Al Ain Oasis
  • Jebel Hafit
  • Mamsha Al Khair 
  • Qasr Al Watan 
  • Qasr Al-Hosn
  • Sheikh Zayed Bridge

Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque 

The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque is the crown jewel of Abu Dhabi. Named after the founding father of the United Arab Emirates, Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, the building is made from Macedonian marble which gives the structure a feeling of grandness. The Mosque can hold 40,000 worshippers, and is also home to the worlds largest crystal chandelier. 

Photo by Pavlo Luchkovski from Pexels

Etihad Towers  

Etihad Towers is a five-tower structure which offers areas to live, work, stay, shop, and dine. The dramatic structures include exclusive shopping at The Avenue, a five star hotel for guests to enjoy a luxury stay, and an observation deck with panoramic views of Abu Dhabi. If you’re looking for grandeur on your holiday, book yourself into the Etihad Towers and enjoy. 

Image by Dr. Norbert Heidenbluth

Masdar City 

Glimpse into the future at Masdar City, the centre of clean energy technology in Abu Dhabi. Visitors can enter the city completely free of charge, and ride into the centre in unmanned electric cars. Marvel at the architecture, made with renewable energy in mind, before relaxing with a coffee at one of the many coffee shops and restaurants within the city. This futuristic city proves that renewable energy is the future, and it proves to be an exciting experience for residents and tourists alike. 

Image by Sa7er90

Heritage Village 

Fully immerse yourself in Abu Dhabi’s past at the Heritage Village. Run by the Emirates Heritage Club, local artisans run regular public workshops which allow visitors to pick up local skills. Whilst exploring the village, enjoy traditional Abu Dhabi food, entertainment, and shop for beautiful, one-of-a-kind, handmade artefacts. If you want to get a true sense of Abu Dhabi, the Heritage Village should be on your holiday bucket list. 

Image by Banja-Frans Mulder

Al Ain Oasis 

Continuing with the exploration of Abu Dhabi’s past, Al Ain Oasis provides a unique insight into Abu Dhabi’s inhabitants that began taming the desert 4,000 years ago. Spread across 1,200 hectares, farmers tens to thousands of date palms, fodder crops, and fruit trees. Water to the oasis is supplied by wells and the ancient falaj system, that taps underground or mountain aquifers. Al Ain Oasis has been a part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site list since 2011, but has only recently been opened to the public due to its educational Eco-Centre and shaded pathways.

Image by Allan Henderson

Jebel Hafit 

There is no better way to view Al Ain, Abu Dhabi’s lush garden city, than from the top of Jebel Hafit mountain. Reaching 1,249 meters into the sky, Jebel Hafit is Abu Dhabi’s highest peak, and the United Arab Emirates second highest. Formed from limestone, you can reach the mountains summit via car, motorbike, or bicycle. As you journey up the mountain, observe the weathered limestone which has held thousands of fossils over the years that have uncovered Abu Dhabi’s ancient history. After making it down from the mountain, head to the Desert Park to discover more about the archaeological remains that have been found. 

Image by Riyaz Ahamed

Mamsha Al Khair  

Mamsha Al Khair is an inspirational landmark of granite and limestone installations spread along the Abu Dhabi Corniche promenade. Each installation has inscriptions from globally renowned and inspirational leaders, both past and present, reflecting the United Arab Emirates ongoing commitment to a culture of generosity and giving. Visitors are encouraged to interact with the monuments, taking photos and videos with them, so that future generations can foster a legacy of generosity. 

Image by FritzDaCat

Qasr Al Watan 

Qasr Al Watan is a grand Presidential palace, which proudly displays the rich legacy of knowledge and tradition that has shaped the United Arab Emirates. As you wander the rooms and halls of Qasr Al Watan you will discover the history of the United Arab Emirates, from the country’s formation, to it’s governing traditions and values. One of the palaces most impressive attractions is the Palace in Motion event, a mesmerising light and sound show that celebrates the UAE’s journey. For a cultural experience that mixes art with history, head to Qasr Al Watan. 

Image by Xavier Cartron

Qasr Al-Hosn

Built as a protective watchtower in 1761, before becoming home to the royal family of the United Arab Emirates, Qasr Al-Hosn is a must see landmark. Made from stone, it is one of Abu Dhabi’s oldest stone buildings and is mesmerising to look at. The museum within the watchtowers grounds takes you on the journey of how the land around Abu Dhabi has changed over the years, giving you a feeling of connection to the land. 

Image by Peturrunar

Sheikh Zayed Bridge

The Sheikh Zayed Bridge is said to be the most complex bridge ever built. Designed by architect Dame Zaha Hadid, the bridge is made from curved arches, which mimic sand dunes, a dynamic lighting design, and road decks which suspend from symmetrical steel arches. The bridge stands 64-metres-high and connects Abu Dhabi with the Saadiyat islands across the Maqta Channel. Despite being an everyday bridge, it’s construction is far from everyday, and definitely an Abu Dhabi landmark worth looking out for. 

Image by Alvis Pulvinar

Whilst you explore the landmarks of Abu Dhabi, we will explore your laundry pile. Book your Laundryheap dry cleaning service today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Packing hacks

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Packing to go on holiday can be stressful. There never seems to be enough room in your suitcase, clothing gets creased, and something always seems to spill. Try these packing hacks to avoid any further packing disasters. 

  • Take a large carry-on
  • Be sensible with your carry-on
  • Know what you’re taking
  • Take versatile clothing
  • Roll don’t fold
  • Pack shoes first
  • Utilise shoe space
  • Invest in liquid bottles
  • Ziplock bags
  • Dryer sheets in your case

Take a large carry-on 

Your carry-on is the perfect place to store any overspill from your suitcase. It’s always best to check with your airline prior to packing, however, the average size of a carry-on is 22”-14”-9”. It’s best to take the biggest carry-on you can, not just for extra clothing and holiday essentials, but for any gifts you may buy on your travels. 

Image by ivabalk from Pixabay

Be sensible with your carry-on

Not only should you be using the biggest carry-on you are allowed, but you should be using that space wisely. Your carry-on should be used as an emergency bag in case your suitcase gets lost. Make sure that you pack some clothing, essential toiletries, and any items you may need for the first 24-48 hours of your holiday. It’s terrible to think about your luggage going missing, but it’s best to be prepared. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Know what you’re taking

No matter how long you are away, it’s always best to pre-plan your outfits. This will help you to limit the amount of unnecessary clothing you pack and leave you more space for toiletries and other essentials. Make sure that you pack enough outfits to last your whole trip, but be mindful of the amount of space you have in your suitcase and carry-on.

Photo by Liza Summer from Pexels

Take versatile clothing

One of the best ways to save space when packing for a holiday is to take versatile clothing. Try and take items that can be worn every day and that can be easily transferred from day to night. Think of ways you can use accessories and shoes to dress up or dress down an outfit. 

Photo by Asad Photo Maldives from Pexels

Roll don’t fold 

Although it may feel natural to fold, always roll. Rolling your clothing will conserve precious space in your suitcase and also limit creases in your garments. You can roll items individually, or roll your outfits for each day together, it’s completely up to you, just avoid folding at all costs. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Pack shoes first 

Shoes are the most awkward item to pack. They are an awkward shape that never seem to fit properly in your suitcase, and they usually end up bent and creased. It’s best practice to pack your shoes first for two reasons. Firstly, if you have any dirt or debris on the bottom of your shoes it won’t be transferred onto your clothing. Secondly, you can fit your more pliable items, such as clothing, around your shoes, utilising the little space you have. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Utilise shoe space 

As we’ve established, shoes are an awkward shape, which means they also take up quite a lot of space. Use your shoes as extra storage for smaller items. Underwear, toiletries, and accessories are all items small enough to fit inside your shoes rather than letting them take up valuable bag space. Just make sure you spray your shoes before inserting anything into them to avoid your underwear smelling of feet. 

Photo by Lum3n from Pexels

Invest in travel bottles 

If you are storing your liquids in your carry on you will have to adhere to the 100ml’s limit per item. To help you stick to this limit, invest in travel bottles- small bottles that hold no more than 100 ml’s. You can pour your toiletries into each bottle and shake off the worry of carrying more liquid than you are allowed. What’s more, these bottles are reusable so you will have them on-hand for your next holiday.

Ziploc bags 

It can be incredibly annoying when you open your case to find the perfect accessory to finish your outfit, and you just can’t seem to find it. Never lose your accessories, and smaller items, on holiday again by storing them in a Ziploc bag. You can even store your Ziploc in one of your shoes

Image by SonnyandSandy

Dryer sheets in your case 

Keep your suitcase and its contents smelling fresh by placing a handful of dryer sheets throughout your case. They will absorb any musty smells, and ensure that you get fresh smelling clothes every day of your holiday. 

Image by trenttsd

If you run out of clothing during your holiday, don’t panic. We work internationally to ensure that our customers can have fresh and clean clothing wherever they are. To check that we service your area, and to book your Laundryheap order, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Copenhagen must-see sights

Image by City Clock Magazine

When you are visiting a country for only a small amount of time, it can be hard to prioritse what you should see and what you can miss. If you are visiting Copenhagen, these are the sites you should not be missing out on. 

  • Tivoli Gardens 
  • Christiansborg Palace
  • Nyhavn Harbour
  • The Round Tower
  • The Little Mermaid
  • Torvehallerne Food Market
  • Frederik’s Church
  • Rosenborg Castle 
  • The Wooden Skyscraper 
  • Bakken 

Tivoli Gardens

The magic of Tivoli Gardens is a Copenhagen site that you would be devastated to miss. Since its opening in 1843, Tivoli Gardens has been delighting visitors of all ages with its beautiful architecture, lush gardens, and, at night, twinkling lights that add to the fairy tale atmosphere. Walt Disney himself even visited Tivoli Gardens and said that it was his inspiration for Disney World. Whether you are a thrill-seeker looking to ride the rollercoasters, or you’re more interested in taking in the beautiful architecture and gardens, there is something to please everyone at Tivoli Gardens. 

Image by Charlie

Christiansborg Palace

If you want to experience 800 years of history in one day then head to Christiansborg Palace. Although most of the palace is open for visitors to tour, it is still home to the Danish parliament, the Prime Ministers office, and the Supreme Court, and some rooms are still occupied by the Royal Family. With every ticket for the Royal Reception Rooms, you will be given a free guided tour of the palace. Even if you don’t want to explore the inside, the outside of the palace is just as beautiful. 

Image by Jorge Franganillo

Nyhavn Harbour

Nyhavn was once a busy commercial port where ships from across the world would dock. Today, you can find hoards of people relaxing, drinking, and enjoying jazz music in restaurants that line the port. The old houses of Nyhavn, some of which fairy tale writer Hans Christian Anderson occupied, have been renovated and in their place stand brightly coloured homes that paint the perfect picture of happiness. If you’re looking for somewhere to drink, eat good food, and enjoy a relaxing day, then look no further than Nyhavn Harbour.

Image by E_Scott from Pixabay

The Round Tower

Built in 1642, The Round Tower is a 36-meter-high building that offers incredible views of the Old Town of Copenhagen. The tower was built by Christian IV in a time when Denmark was renowned for its astronomical achievements, thanks to Tycho Brahe. When Brahe died, Christian IV built The Round Tower to encourage astronomers to carry on Brahe’s work. Today, it is still used by amateur astronomers, but is used more to get panoramic views of the Old Town. Be warned, to get to the viewing platform you must walk up a spiral staircase, but, if the staircases hasn’t already, the view at the top will take your breath away. 

Image by Maria Eklind

The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid has become an iconic landmark in Copenhagen. Based off of the Hans Christian Anderson tale of the same name, the statue sits by the waterside at the Langelinie promenade, and depicts a human turning into a mermaid. It was commissioned in 1909 by Carl Jacobsen, who had become fascinated by a ballet based on the tale. Edvard Eriksen sculpted the piece, and the grand unveiling took place in August 1913. It has since become a symbol for Copenhagen in the same way at the Statue of Liberty has for New York, and tourists flock to the statute to take pictures. You may be waiting a while to see the mermaid, but you wouldn’t want to miss it. 

Photo by C1superstar from Pexels

Torvehallerne Food Market

Conveniently situated close to Nørreport Station, Torvehallerne Food Market is one of Copenhagen’s most popular markets. With more than 80 shops to browse, you can find everything from traditional Danish food to local vegetables and fresh fish. It’s the perfect place to stroll around at your leisure, try some samples, and enjoy what produce Copenhagen has to offer. 

Image by Heather Cowper

Frederik’s Church

Nicknamed The Marble Church, Frederik’s Church is one of the most impressive buildings in Copenhagen. Located in Frederiksstaden, the foundation stone of the church was laid in 1749, but the project was not completed until 1894. The building itself is incredibly striking, with a copper green dome that juxtaposes the delicate white marble beautifully. Inside the church is equally as delightful, so it is no surprise that couples are desperate to get married here. The church room is open to the public, as is the dome which offers draw-dropping views of Copenhagen. 

Image by Tony Webster

Rosenborg Castle 

Built as a country summer house by Christian IV 400 years ago, Rosenborg Castle offers visitors the chance to travel back in time and explore the grandeur of Christian IV life. After exploring the pomp and pageantry of the castle, visitors can roam the Kongens Have (the Kings Garden), the oldest royal garden in Denmark. Estimated to attract 2.5 million visitors every year, these gardens are a popular retreat for tourists and locals alike. Sit on the lush green grass, wander the paths, and feel like a true royal for the day.

Image by Steve Barker from Pixabay

The Wooden Skyscraper 

An hour south of Copenhagen, standing in the Gisselfeld Klosters Forest, you will find Denmark’s Wooden Skyscraper. What appears to be a structure right out of a Hans Christian Anderson fairy tale, is a 45 meter tall observation tower, completed with a spiralling walkway for easy access. Made from weathered steel and local oak, the structure blends seamlessly into the surrounding forest environment. Once you reach the top, you will be treated to views of rolling hills, lakes, and, on a clear day, Copenhagen. Although you have to travel an hour outside of the city to reach the structure, the spectacular view, both on the way up and from the top, is worth it.

Image by Stig Nygaard

Bakken 

Located in the woods of Dyrehaven you will find Bakken, the oldest amusement park in the world. Founded in 1853, Bakken has been delighting visitors of all ages for centuries. Whether you are a thrill seeker looking to ride rollercoasters, or you want to stroll around the independent stalls, there is something for everyone. Whilst visiting, look out for Pjerrot, the white-faced clown who has been delighting visitors since the parks opening. 

Image by J M Rice

With so many amazing sights in Copenhagen, the last sight you want to see is your laundry pile. Luckily, we can take care of that for you. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to make your booking today. 


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Living in London made easier

Photo by Mike from Pexels

Living in London can be hard. It’s expensive, people can be rude, and the tube system is a labyrinth that not even the most seasoned Londoner can understand. But, it is also a multicultural metropolis, overflowing with amazing things to see and adventures to have. There are an abundance of ways that can make living in London less stressful, less costly, and, overall, easier. 

  • Oyster cards
  • Railcard
  • Maps
  • Savings websites
  • Banking
  • Weather 
  • Theatre 
  • Food
  • The Residence
  • Laundryheap 

Oyster cards

Whether you prefer taking the bus, tube, or train, there is no escaping public transport in London. You can pay for public transport via contactless or card payment, however, the best way is via an Oyster card. An Oyster card is a reusable card that can be used on all forms of public transport across London. You can top up your card at most London tube stations or online whenever you are running low on funds, and use it the very same day. What is more, Oyster cards have a cap on how much you can spend in one day, meaning that you will never be charged more than £13.50.

Image by Rachel Lovinger

Railcard 

A Railcard is incredibly handy to have for travelling both within and outside of London. There are several different types of Railcard that you can purchase, however they are all priced between £20 and £30. With a Railcard, you can get one third off of your train fares and, if you link it to your Oyster card, one third off of off-peak rail fares, including the tube and DLR. 

Photo by Paul IJsendoorn from Pexels

Maps

London is a big city. So big, in fact, that it would be preposterous to even imagine navigating it without using a map. Luckily, there are several useful apps that can help you to not only navigate the city, but also plan public transport journeys. These apps mean that you will never get lost in London again, and that you will always be able to find public transport to aid you on your journey. 

Photo by Ingo Joseph from Pexels

Savings websites

Living in London can be incredibly expensive. Bills, food shopping, transport, the cost of living, it all adds up. Luckily, there are several savings websites that offer discounts on all manner of items, including everyday essentials and nights out. Simply head to these discount websites and search for items you are looking for discounts on. If you find a website in particular that offers good deals, subscribing to their newsletter will often give you a first-look at what discounts are available and/or coming up. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Banking 

With so much to do, see, and experience in London, it can be very easy to let your money get away from you. The majority of banks now have apps that can help you access your bank account faster. They will often send notifications directly to your phone when money is coming out of your account or when you are running out of funds. If you are looking for an alternative way to manage your money, Monzo is an online bank whose app helps to break down exactly where your money is being spent. This helps to identify what areas you are spending the most money on, and perhaps where you could save. 

Photo by Anete Lusina from Pexels

Weather

UK weather is unpredictable. The sun could be shining brightly in the morning but by the evening you could be stuck in torrential rain. Most phones now come with a weather app pre-downloaded, however, if you don’t have one, it’s best to download one ASAP. It will help you to plan your day around changes in the weather, meaning you will never be caught in the rain without an umbrella again. 

Photo by S Migaj from Pexels

Theatre 

One of the many joys of living in London is the glorious West End, where there is no end to the wonderful musicals and plays that are performed every day. If you enjoy a trip to the theatre, then you will want to download Stagedoor. It can be hard to narrow down what to see on the West End, but Stagedoor can make your choice easier with reviews from both theatre critics and previous audience members. On the app you can also book tickets and access offers for discounted meals and even discounted tickets. The wonders of the West End awaits. 

Photo by Monica Silvestre from Pexels

Food

London is a multicultural hub and, as such, there are an abundance of restaurants to try. Eating at different restaurants guarantees that you will always be treated to amazing food, however can be incredibly expensive. Luckily, apps, such as OpenTable, offer huge discounts on some of the top restaurants in London. Simply see what reservations they have open, and book as soon as possible. Be quick though, because there will be other eagle eyed people waiting for a top reservation at a low price, so you have to act fast. 

Photo by Sebastian Coman Photography from Pexels

The Residence 

One of the most difficult parts of living in London is finding the perfect home. You want to find somewhere that is within your budget, with good transport links, and plenty of local amenities- which is easier said than done. Luckily, The Residence offers the perfect solution. Whilst you find your dream home, you can stay in one of The Residence luxury apartments, located specifically for ease of commute, accessibility of services, and transport links. The contemporary design of each apartment offers a relaxing oasis from the hustle and bustle of city living, whilst also creating the perfect environment for finding your dream home. What is more, all guests of The Residence can enjoy 20% off of their first Laundryheap order using the code RD20. 

Image courtesy of The Residence website

Laundryheap 

We all detest doing laundry, and when you live in the city it seems like there are never enough hours in the day to get it done. Luckily, Laundryheap is here to help. We pick up your dirty laundry, wash it, and re-deliver it to you, all in as little as 24 hours. All you have to do is head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to make your booking today. At least that’s one thing ticked off of your to-do list.


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Rotterdam fun facts

Rotterdam is the second largest city in the Netherlands, made famous for its modern architecture. Quirky architecture is not the only interesting thing about Rotterdam though. 

  • The flag of Rotterdam
  • Rotterdam’s motto
  • An old city
  • Netherlands skyline
  • Spy centre
  • Europort
  • Eco station
  • Dr
  • Expats
  • The Witte Huis 

The flag of Rotterdam 

The colours of Rotterdam have been green and white since the Middle Ages, but the number of lines on the flag have changed. The current flag, which has been official since 1949, is a green horizontal stripe followed by a white stripe, and a final green stripe. The green represents the Court of Wena, a castle that stood on the former Hofplein Station, and the white symbolises the Rotte river. 

Image by Jeroen Kransen

Rotterdam’s motto  

Rotterdam’s motto is ‘sterker door strijd’, which translates to ‘stronger through battle’. It was adopted after the second world war by Queen Wilhelmina as a testament to the courage and bravery of Rotterdammers during the second world war. You can see the motto underneath the coat of arms of Rotterdam. 

Image by Le contributeur wikicommons Arch.

An old city 

Looking around Rotterdam, admiring it’s modern architecture, you would believe that it was a fairly new city. In fact, Rotterdam gained its city rights in 1340. Unfortunately, the city was heavily bombed during the second world war, and so most of it had to be rebuilt, forming the city we know today. 

Image by Clemens Lettinck from Pixabay

Netherlands skyline  

Rotterdam is the only city in the Netherlands with a skyline. Made from 352 high-rise buildings, the Rotterdam skyline is often referred to as ‘the Manhattan on the Maas’ because most of the buildings are situated on the river Maas and new high rises are constantly being built. The tallest building in Rotterdam, and the Netherlands, is the Maastoren, which is 165 meters tall. 

Image by Rob Oo

Spy centre  

During the first world war, Rotterdam became the biggest spy centre in the world for both Germany and Britain. This was because the Netherlands, and therefore Rotterdam, was a neutral country and was also placed perfectly in between Germany and Britain. Rotterdam was particularly popular because it had excellent ferry and railway connections with Britain, Germany, and Belgium.

Image by Markus Christ from Pixabay 

Europort 

Rotterdam’s harbour, Europort, is the biggest port in Europe, 10th biggest port in the world, and the 11th biggest container port in the world. It is considered one of the busiest ports in the world and a major entry point into Europe

Image by Rik Schuiling / TropCrop-TCS

Eco station

Rotterdam Central Station is the main station in Rotterdam. It’s roof is formed from 28,000 square meters of glass plates and 10,000 square meters of stainless steel. 10,000 meters of the glass contain 136,000 solar cells, which supplies 8% of the daily electricity the train station uses. 

Image by Rudy and Peter Skitterians from Pixabay

Dr

In the Scheepsvaart area of Rotterdam is a secret club called Dr. Known as one of the best cocktail bars in Rotterdam, you can only enter the bar if you have a patient number that you are given when you pre-book. As the name suggests, the bar is doctor themed, but once inside you are not allowed to take photos, use your phone, or talk about the bar. The air of mystery is what has helped maintain the hype and mystery of the cocktail bar since its opening in 2012. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Expats

Only, roughly, 50% of the people living in Rotterdam are Dutch. The city attracts a large number of expats, mostly due to its renowned universities, and, as such, is hugely multicultural. It now has its own Chinatown, an abundance of restaurants catering to world cuisines, and festivals to celebrate its ever growing multiculturalism. 

The Witte Huis 

The Witte Huis, or the White House, was the first skyscraper in Rotterdam. Built between 1897 and 1898 by architect Willem Molenbroek, the building is 11 stories high. There were many people who were sceptical as to whether the building would be supported by the soil. It was one of the only buildings in Rotterdam city centre that survived the big bombardment in 1940. 

Image by MatteoNL97

Reading fun facts about Rotterdam is great, but experiencing them first hand is even better. Whilst you explore Rotterdam, let us sort out your laundry. Book your Laundryheap order by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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Stockholm must-see sights

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Stockholm is a beautiful city, filled with so many amazing sights it can be overwhelming to narrow down the ones to see first. Hopefully, our Stockholm must-see sights list can help shed some light on the sights you simply can not miss. 

  • The Abba museum 
  • Skansen 
  • The Royal Palace
  • Skyview
  • Royal National City Park
  • Gamla Stan
  • Paradiset Nature Reserve
  • Birka 
  • The Nobel museum 

The Abba museum 

When you think of Sweden it’s almost impossible to not think of Abba. The band’s career defined a decade and their influence can still be heard in today’s music industry. You can take a deep dive into the legendary back catalogue of Abba at the Abba museum. Unlike any other museum, this is an interactive experience which encourages visitors to dance, play, and, most importantly, have fun. You can try on Abba’s infamous costumes, mix their original music, and even perform with them live on stage. You may walk into the museum, but you will certainly be dancing on your way out. 

Image by Mike Licht

Skansen

If you want to learn about the history of Sweden, visit Skansen. It is the world’s oldest open air museum, where the past meets the present in perfect harmony. Opened in 1891, more than 150 buildings from across Sweden were collected and reassembled to create a traditional Swedish town. Once you have wandered around the manor houses, bakeries, and churches of times past, you can visit the Skansen aquarium and zoo. Home to more than 200 species from around the world, you can marvel at bears, wolves, and seals, before aweing at the marine life on show. Skansen is the perfect day out for all ages. 

Image by Holger.Ellgaard

The Royal Palace

The Royal Palace is the official residence of His Majesty the King and one of Europe’s largest and most dynamic palaces. Built in a baroque style, the palace has more than 600 rooms, divided over 11 floors, including 3 museums. Guided tours are offered around the palace and it’s grounds, however, even if you don’t take a guided tour, the palace is a striking building to admire and a definite must-see sight. 

Image by Mariano Mantel

SkyView

The best way to view Stockholm is by taking the SkyView. Travelling up Stockholm’s Avicii Arena, the world’s largest spherical building, in a clear glass pod, you will be treated to 360 degree, panoramic, views of Stockholm. Each trip takes roughly 30 minutes, so you will have plenty of time to take in the sights before heading to one of the Avicii Arena’s legendary shows. 

Image by kallerna

Royal National City Park

The Royal National City Park was the first urban park in the world. Stretching 6 miles long, the park joins the city of Stockholm with the neighbouring forests, meaning an array of wildlife can be spotted roaming the fields. You could spend days getting lost in the confines of the park, exploring the lakes and rocky hilltops. Nestled within the park are an abundance of attractions, including museums, an amusement park, and sports facilities.

Image by Mariano Mantel

Gamla Stan

Gamla Stan is where Stockholm was founded in 1252. It is one of the largest and well preserved city centres in Europe, and acts as a fully functional museum. As you journey through winding cobbled streets you can admire cellar vaults from the Middle Ages, alongside restaurants, cafes, and bars. Within Gamla Stan you will find some of Stockholm’s most iconic buildings, including Sweden’s national cathedral and the Royal Palace. Gamla Stan has historical significance hidden behind every corner, so make sure that you take a full day to fully explore its alleys. 

Photo by Katie Evensen from Pexels

Paradiset Nature Reserve

The Swedish interpretation of paradise can be found at Paradiset Nature Reserve. A popular spot for hikers, the reserve is formed from untouched forests, lakes and cliffs. Nestled within the depths of the reserve are small cabins that are free to stay in overnight. They operate on a first come first serve basis so it’s best to snap one up ASAP. Paradiset Nature Reserve is the perfect place to get away from the city and escape into nature. 

Image by Holger.Ellgaard

Birka 

Founded in the 8th Century, Birka is Sweden’s oldest town. What was once a flourishing Viking trading town is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site that can easily be visited by boat. Whilst visiting Birka you can experience what life would have been like for a viking. You can stroll through an exact replica of a Viking village, meet the Elk Man from the 8th Century, and discover objects found from archaeological excavations. It’s a true deep-dive into the history of Sweden. 

Image by chas B

The Nobel Museum 

Opened in the Spring of 2001 to celebrate The Nobel Prize’s 100th anniversary, The Nobel Museum provides information about the Nobel Prize and past Nobel Prize winners. Through a combination of films, theatre plays, and debates, the work of Nobel Prize winners is immortalised within the walls of the Nobel Museum. You can even take a piece of The Nobel Prize away with you when you visit the gift shop.

Image by Tuomas Vitikainen

Whilst you are out exploring Stockholm, we can explore your laundry basket. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your order.