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How to find your dream Singapore home

Photo by Kelly Lacy from Pexels

Finding your dream Singapore home is hard. It’s exciting and scary all at the same time. That is why we have devised this ‘How To’ guide to help you narrow down your search. 

  • Set a budget
  • Choose an area
  • Discuss facilities
  • Look at the amenities
  • Do some research
  • Get the feeling
  • Use Casa Mia Coliving

Set a budget

The first step in finding your dream Singapore home is to set a budget. Have a frank and honest discussion, evaluate your financial situation, and set a realistic price range for your home. This will help you to narrow your search by eliminating properties that are over your budget.

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Choose an area

Your next task is to choose the area that you would like to move to. Singapore is a beautiful location, but each area has something different to offer. For example, Marina Bay is within walking distance of the Singapore Business District, and therefore the perfect location for working professionals. Defining an area for your dream house could be based on price, amenities, work, or relationships. Whatever your reason for choosing an area, defining a specific location for your house-hunt will streamline your search.

Photo by Jahoo Clouseau from Pexels

Discuss facilities

Facilities are a large part of finding your dream home. Make a list of all of the facilities you want in your dream home, perhaps splitting your list into dealbreakers and non-essentials, and refer to your list when you go on viewings. You will find that there are some facilities that you will be willing to live without for the perfect house, whereas others are essentials that could turn a supposedly perfect house into the wrong one. 

Look at the amenities 

Amenities, such as schools, restaurants, and shops, could be a deciding factor for the area you choose to search and are imperative to look at before deciding on your dream home. Important local amenities will be different for each individual, so prioritise the amenities that you view as important. For example, if you have, or want, children, schools and parks may be an important local amenity for you and your family. 

Photo by David McBee from Pexels

Do some research

Whilst finding your dream home, go the extra mile and do some research into the area you will be moving to. A quick search on the internet, talking to people, and spending some time in the area can be all it takes to decide whether your dream home is right for you. It’s better to do your research now before papers are signed rather than later. 

Photo by Christina Morillo from Pexels

Get the feeling

No matter how much research and preparation you do, the most important thing to consider when finding your dream home is how you feel about it. Take the time to view various properties and evaluate how you feel at each one. You may find that the one that feels like home is the one you least expected. Keep an open mind and follow your feelings.

Photo by Teona Swift from Pexels

Use Casa Mia Coliving

If you are a young professional, you may struggle to find the time to look for your dream Singapore home. Luckily, Casa Mia Coliving provides the perfect solution. Casa Mia is a coliving property manager offering private bedrooms in shared homes with a convenient search process and a great community. They offer affordable accommodation, with flexible terms, and all the services you need to just move in and start enjoying your new place.

You can now get 5% off of your first three months when you use the code LAHP5. Head to https://www.casamia.co/page/singapore to see what’s available and use the code LAHP5  in the request form on each of your chosen homes. 

Whilst you are busy searching for your dream Singapore home, don’t let your laundry pile up, let us take care of it for you. Book your Laundryheap order today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Singapore travel essentials

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Packing for a Singapore trip takes careful planning and consideration. Luckily, we have outlined some of the essentials it is vital for you to pack. 

  • Passport/ ID card
  • Guidebook 
  • Suncream 
  • Mosquito repellent
  • Water bottle
  • Travel adapter
  • Portable charger
  • Practical footwear
  • A day pack
  • Plenty of clothing

Passport/ ID card 

You will need your passport to get into Singapore, but even after entering the country, it’s best to carry it around with you. Singapore is an extremely safe country, and if you are out late at night you may be asked to show your ID to police officers. It’s always best to be prepared and keep it on your person at all times. 

Photo by Porapak Apichodilok from Pexels

Guidebook 

There is an abundance of things to see and do in Singapore. To get the most out of your experience, buy yourself a guidebook before your trip and highlight areas that you would like to explore. Guidebooks are incredibly useful for not only showing what there is to see and do in Singapore but also providing cultural information and even a couple of phrases you can use. 

Photo by Element5 Digital from Pexels

Suncream

It is warm year-round in Singapore, with it being particularly sunny from May to July. Regardless of the time of year you visit, make sure that you pack plenty of suncream to protect you from the sun’s rays. The average temperature in Singapore is 26 degrees celsius, so adequate sun precautions must be taken. 

Photo by RF._.studio from Pexels

Mosquito repellent

Singapore is a tropical country and, as previously mentioned, has a warm and humid climate. These are prime conditions for mosquitos. To prevent yourself from being bitten by mosquitos whilst traveling, have mosquito repellent on hand. All mosquito repellents work differently, so always check the label for directions on how much and how often to use it. 

Image by Mike Mozart

Water bottle

Regardless of the activities you have decided to participate in whilst in Singapore, you will be doing a lot of walking and spending a lot of time outdoors. To help combat Singapore’s hot and humid climate, make sure that you always have a water bottle on hand at all times. It’s important to stay hydrated. 

Photo by Gustavo Fring from Pexels

Travel adapter 

No matter where you are traveling to, it’s always wise to take a travel adapter so that you can plug in any appliances you may need. In Singapore, they use three plug types: plug type C, which has 2 rounded pins, plug type G, which has three rectangular pins in a triangular formation, and plug type M, which has three rounded pins. 

Photo by Markus Spiske from Pexels

Portable charger 

Singapore is overflowing with things to see and do, and it’s handy to have a fully charged phone whilst exploring. It’s always best to have at least a small amount of charge on your phone for emergencies, so a portable charger will come in extremely handy when you’re out for long days. 

Photo by Lukas from Pexels

Practical footwear 

As previously mentioned, there is a high chance that you will be doing a lot of walking whilst in Singapore, which is why it’s best to take comfortable and practical footwear. Trainers are ideal for walking long distances, however, if you are going on hikes, hiking boots may be a better alternative. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

A day pack

It’s important to keep all of your everyday essentials, such as your phone, money, and mini first aid kit, with you at all times. The best way to transport these essentials is in a small backpack or day pack. Your day pack should be lightweight, but big enough to carry all of your essentials. It’s important to find a day pack that is secure so any thievery is avoided. 

Photo by Sebastian Voortman from Pexels

Plenty of clothing

It may seem like an obvious point to make, but it is important that you pack plenty of clothing for your Singapore trip. The weather in Singapore can be intensely warm, so it’s vital to pack clothing that is lightweight and comfortable, whilst keeping you protected from the sun. If you are traveling to Singapore to experience both the day and nightlife, it is important to pack a few evening wear outfits, as well as clothing suitable for daytime walks and exploring. Be smart with what you pack. 

Photo by Monstera from Pexels

Before you travel to Singapore, or even whilst you are staying, let Laundryheap take care of all of your laundry for you. We can pick up, dry clean, and re-deliver your clothing to you, wherever you are. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your order. 


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Top Coventry tourism spots

Coventry is a West Midlands city that was founded in the Middle Ages. It is the 9th largest city in England, and brimming with must-see tourism spots.

  • Coventry music museum 
  • Allesley park 
  • Bagot’s castle 
  • Brandon Marsh nature reserve
  • St Michael’s tower climb

Coventry music museum

The Coventry music museum is an independent museum celebrating the unique music stylings in Coventry and its surrounding areas. It is the life-long vision of music historian and journalist Pete Chambers and his wife Julie. As you travel through the museum you are transported through the decades, exploring the vast music scene that is at the heart of Coventry. Admission is £4 for adults and £1 for children, with concessions only paying £2. These admission fees, and any other generous donations given by the public, are used to maintain the museum and its incredible exhibits. 

Allesley park 

Allesley park is a picturesque and historic nature experience. In the 13th century, it was used as a deer park, but now visitors can enjoy the rolling hills and unspoiled green space at their leisure. Nestled within Allesley park is a wide variety of fun activities to keep the whole family entertained, including an 18-hole golf course, a 9-hole crazy golf course, and a children’s play area. If you are visiting Coventry on a warm summer’s day, Allesley park is a great location for family fun. 

Bagot’s castle

For those who enjoy history, Bagot’s castle will prove to be an interesting experience. The castle itself lies in ruins, however, the original building is believed to have been constructed in the 11th century at the time of King Henry the first. In the late 1300s, the castle was rebuilt by Sir William Bagot who entertained many distinguished guests, including Henry IV. Bagot’s castle has remained derelict since the 16th Century, however, in recent years, has had a renewed interest. When you visit the castle today, you can explore the ruins, as well as enjoy a woodland walk, and visit the Bagot goats, a rare breed of goat known to have been around since the late 1300s. 

Image by Amanda Slater

Brandon Marsh nature reserve

If you love being surrounded by nature, then the Brandon Marsh nature reserve is a Coventry spot you don’t want to miss. Spanning 92 hectares, Brandon Marsh is well known for the quality of its reedbeds, pools, and woodlands. As such, it attracts a huge variety of birds and wildlife for guests to observe. Once you have trekked the reserve, you can head to The Badger’s Kitchen to unwind and relax with tea and cake, whilst watching the birds fly on live nestcams. 

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St Michael’s tower climb

For the best views in Coventry, put on your comfiest shoes and take on the St Michael’s tower climb. Open seven days a week, excluding bell ringing sessions, you can take the 180 step climb at any point on your Coventry trip, and admire the stunning view of Coventry and its surrounding countryside. After you’ve taken on the tower, you can wander around the rest of Coventry cathedral, including the ruins of the medieval parish church and surrounding grounds.

 

Whilst you are exploring the top Coventry tourism spots, we will be getting your laundry ready for your return. Book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Kuwait City travel guide

Image by Dima Soufi

Kuwait City is home to a beautiful coastline, sprawling desert, and a plethora of museums. If you’re traveling to Kuwait City, this travel guide will give you all of the information you need to know. 

  • Temperature 
  • VISA and passport requirements
  • How to get to Kuwait City
  • Currency
  • Must-see sights
  • Top delicacy 
  • Nightlife

Temperature

Kuwait City has a hot desert climate with temperatures averaging at 45 degrees celsius. In the summer months, Kuwait City experiences some of the hottest temperatures on earth as well as strong wind and dust storms that can last for days. The ideal time to visit Kuwait City is in the spring when temperatures are lower and the humidity is less intense.

Image by Francisco Anzola

VISA and passport requirements

To travel to Kuwait City you need both a VISA and a passport. Your passport must be valid for at least six months. Nationals from the USA and Europe can obtain one-month VISAs on arrival for business or tourist purposes. VISAs on arrivals are free for British nationals, but can not be extended. 

Photo by nappy from Pexels

How to get to Kuwait City 

The easiest way to get to Kuwait City from the UK or USA is to fly directly to Kuwait International Airport. If you are traveling into Kuwait City from other areas of Kuwait or the Gulf region, Kuwait Public Transport Company operates coach trips. Alternatively, you can travel by boat from Shuwaikh Port, which is Kuwait’s main port. 

Currency

The currency of Kuwait City is the Kuwait dinar (KWD). As of May 2021, the Kuwait dinar is the strongest circulating currency in the world with one KWD equaling 3.32 United States Dollars (USD). You can change your currency to KWD prior to your trip by visiting a local currency exchange. Alternatively, credit cards are widely accepted in Kuwait City for both paying in shops, restaurants, and attractions, and using ATMs. It is recommended to budget 150KWD per day. 

Image by radiant guy

Must-see sights

There are many beautiful sights in Kuwait City but these are our top three picks: 

Kuwait towers 

Kuwait Towers are an integral part of the Kuwait City skyline and one of the most recognisable landmarks in Kuwait. The Kuwait Towers are made up of three slender towers, with the main tower reaching 187 meters high. You can marvel at the towers from below, or travel up and enjoy a meal in the tower’s restaurant, which offers panoramic views of Kuwait City. 

Grand Mosque

Kuwait City’s Grand Mosque is the official Mosque of Kuwait. Spanning 45,000 square meters, the Grand Mosque includes a prayer hall, library of Islamic reference books and documents, and a 5-level car park. It’s striking structure is truly a sight to behold and should not be missed on your visit to Kuwait City. 

Al Shaheed Park

Al Shaheed Park is the largest urban park in Kuwait. Nestled within the park are a variety of gardens, including the Oasis Garden, Museum Garden, and Seasonal Garden. Amongst these gardens are museums, exhibition areas, and outdoor theatres where performers dazzle guests on a daily basis. It is definitely worth scheduling a trip to Al Shaheed Park on your Kuwait City vacation. 

Image by Cajetan Barretto

Top delicacy 

Machboos is considered the national dish of Kuwait. The dish consists of a bed of rosewater and saffron basmati rice, topped with slow-cooked mutton or chicken. The dish is finished with a drizzle of garlic sauce named Daqqus.

Nightlife

Nightlife in Kuwait City is very different from Western nightlife, as it focuses on friends and food. Rather than drinking alcohol, nightlife in Kuwait City centers around smoking hubble-bubble, a technique where smoke is drawn through a fruity mixture of flavours into a water bowl filled with cold lemon water, which cools the smoke before entering the pipe you draw on. 

Photo by The Castlebar from Pexels

There is so much to do and see in Kuwait City that you won’t have time to do your laundry. Luckily, Laundryheap is here to help. Book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Doha’s best brunches

Photo by Helena Lopes from Pexels

Who doesn’t love going to brunch? In Doha, there are plenty of places that serve outstanding brunch options. These are just our top picks. 

  • Sabai Thai 
  • B-lounge
  • STK Doha
  • CUT
  • Market

Sabai Thai 

Sabai Thai is the best place in Doha to experience authentic Thai cooking, even when visiting for brunch. Their brunch menu is a surprisingly reasonable QR130, and available on Saturdays from 1pm-4pm. Despite the exceptional price, Sabai Thai does not falter when it comes to providing extraordinary Thai brunch cuisine. A stand-out dish would be their Thai Green Curry, washed down with a beautifully refreshing mocktail. 

Image by Bryon Lippincott

B-lounge

If you are looking for a luxurious brunch experience, then look no further than B-lounge. With its beautiful marina views, stylish interiors, and large terrace, B-lounge has made quite the name for itself as the ultimate Doha hangout spot. The food at B-lounge is a seamless blend of Asian flavours with international touches, which carries through to their specialist brunch menu. Beginning with a sushi platter, before moving on to a hot starter, main course, and finishing with a ‘gorgeous platter’, the food at B-lounge is unmatched. If you are in the Doha area, it is definitely worth booking in. 

Photo by Abdullah Ghatasheh from Pexels

STK Doha

STK Doha offers a steak dining experience like no other. Located in the West Bay Lagoon district, you will encounter a mix of traditional and innovative cuisine, which makes for an energetic dining experience. Their brunch menu offers a selection of starters, mains, and desserts, including ginger tofu and daikon salad (starter), a grilled meats platter (main), and an elusive junk chalice (dessert). You can sample their eclectic brunch menu every Friday from 12pm-4pm, with prices from QAR 275 per person. 

Photo by Gonzalo Guzman from Pexels

CUT

Notorious Austrian chef Wolfgang Puck opened CUT in 2017, bringing his classic American steak restaurant to Doha. Wolfgang’s philosophy is to cook simply using the finest selection of beef and locally sourced ingredients and to present them beautifully. This philosophy is perfectly demonstrated in the slow-cooked BBQ brisket on offer as just one of his amazing brunch options. From 12:30pm- 4pm, treat yourself to the finest brunch menu in Doha at CUT. 

Photo by Lukas from Pexels

Market

Market provides many options for breakfast and brunch. Inspired by Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s concept of the Hotel as a Home, Market offers casual comfort food from around the world. If you are looking for a wide variety of food options, you can sample the breakfast buffet for QAR 140. Included in the buffet is a variety of Arabic, American, and International breakfasts, fruits, salads, yogurt, and cereals. Alternatively, you can try something from the A La Carte menu, such as Menemen, eggs benedict, or pancakes. This menu is available from 6am-11am every day. 

Photo by Emrah Tolu from Pexels

Brunch is a meal best served without the worry of laundry. That is why you should book a Laundryheap service and let us take care of it for you. To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Best beaches in Sharjah

Sharjah has a desert climate, with the average daily temperature reaching 26 degrees celsius. This temperature, coupled with the array of beautiful beaches available, makes Sharjah the perfect beach holiday destination. The only question is, which of Sharjah’s beaches is the best to choose from? 

  • Al Khan beach
  • Al Fisht beach
  • Kalba beach
  • Khorfakkan beach
  • Al Lulayyah beach

Al Khan beach 

Located just five minutes away from the Sharjah maritime museum and Sharjah Aquarium, Al Khan beach is one of the most popular in Sharjah, especially for tourists. The 600 meters of sand provide ample space for relaxing in the sun, before taking a dip in the crystal blue ocean. For those who are slightly more adventurous, the Al Khan surf school offers a variety of water sport activities, including surfing, kayaking, and parasailing. If you are enjoying the beach with small children, there is even a play park to occupy their time, leaving you to relax and enjoy the sun warming your skin as you lay on the sand. 

Photo by Adrianna Calvo from Pexels

Al Fisht beach 

Al Fisht beach is the perfect location to enjoy a picnic and walk across the sand. Due to the strong currents, it is strictly prohibited to swim in the water, however, the white sands offer more than enough entertainment. Once you have enjoyed the beach, head to the Al Fisht park, directly opposite the beach, and take a stroll around the perfectly manicured grass lawns. For the little ones, there is a children’s play area complete with swings, see-saws, and a multitude of slides. On clear nights, Al Fisht beach is a popular spot for stargazing as the sounds of the waves crashing as you admire the stars make for an idyllic and relaxing evening. 

Photo by Sebastian Voortman from Pexels

Kalba beach

If you are an animal lover, Kalba beach is perfect for you. Located a stone’s throw away from Khor Kalba Conservation Reserve, it is not unusual to spot rare wildlife wandering across the beach. Kalba beach is also an important nesting site for hawksbill turtles, which are critically endangered, and Arabian-collared kingfishers. The pristine waters of Kalba beach make it a popular site for scuba diving, as both children and adults can discover the habitats of many underwater creatures. Unlike any of the other beaches in Sharjah, at Kalba beach you can spot local fishermen catching fish along the horizon. 

Khorfakkan beach

Khorfakkan beach is a favourite for both tourists and locals. Unlike Al Fisht beach, there is an abundance of fun water activities on offer at Khorfakkan. Whether you enjoy swimming, fishing, and diving, or want to try something more daring, such as kayaking or parasailing, there is plenty of fun to be had. Once you have exhausted yourself playing in the glittering sea, Khorfakkan beach has goalposts set up for a lighthearted football competition. At the end of the day, you can stroll down the beach to Oceanic Resort and Spa, which offers luxury accommodation and pamper packages, perfect for unwinding after a long day of having fun in the sun. 

Al Lulayyah beach

If camping on the beach under the stars sounds appealing to you, then Al Lulayyah beach is the perfect beach for you. You will find Al Lulayyah on the east coast, separated from the main road by farmland. Its peaceful tranquility attracts campers, particularly on the weekend, who pitch their tents right on the sand and enjoy a few days relaxing by the sea. If camping on the sand doesn’t interest you, one of the nearby farms welcomes campers, and even comes complete with a BBQ area and playground. Al Lulayyah beach is the ideal beach for taking things slow, enjoying a dip in the sea, and maybe even taking part in some fishing. 

Photo by Dziana Hasanbekava from Pexels

Whilst you explore the beaches that Sharjah has to offer, let Laundryheap take care of your dirty laundry. To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Rotterdam must-see sights

Photo by Steshka Willems from Pexels

Rotterdam is a major port city in the south of Holland. After being mostly destroyed during World War 2, Rotterdam was rebuilt and is now known for its bold and modern architecture, amongst its other must-see sights. 

  • The Cube Houses
  • Market Hall
  • The Kinderdijk Windmills
  • Kunsthal Rotterdam
  • Erasmus Bridge
  • Rotterdam boat tour
  • The Witte Huis
  • Luchtsingel Bridge
  • Delfshaven
  • Floating Forest

The Cube Houses 

The Cube Houses are one of Rotterdam’s most iconic sites. They were designed by architect Piet Blom in the late 1970s, who designed the housing development as cubes tilted at a 45-degree angle. Their asymmetrical design was intended to resemble an abstract forest, with each triangular rooftop representing a tree. You can see how the space inside each cube has been utilised by visiting the Show Cube, which holds the original designs and history of the development. Conveniently located next to the Rotterdam Blaak railway station, The Cube Houses are easily accessible, and even form a pedestrian bridge into the city center. 

Photo by Claudia Schmalz from Pexels

Market Hall

Nicknamed “Koopboog” (horseshoe) by locals, the Market Hall is a popular hangout spot for locals and tourists. Formed from an office complex opened in 2014, the Market Hall comes complete with arched ceilings and larger-than-life murals of produce that celebrate the array of fresh food that is on offer. Here, fast food stores and fancy restaurants live in perfect harmony, and you may find it difficult to choose where to eat. From traditional Dutch delicacies to Spanish tapas, you will find an array of cuisines to fit any pallet. 

Image by ddzphoto from Pixabay

The Kinderdijk Windmills

Located 23 kilometers east of Rotterdam, is the idyllic village of Kinderdijk, where you can find the 19 Kinderdijk Windmills. Built between 1722 and 1761, each of the 19 windmills is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Together, they form the largest surviving concentration of windmills in the country. Despite not being active, on National Mill Day, celebrated on the second Saturday and Sunday of May, their sails are spun. The Kinderdijk Windmills are one of the most visited and iconic places in the Netherlands, and definitely worth seeing. 

Image by BriYYZ

Kunsthal Rotterdam

Kunsthal was opened in 1992 and has been the host of a wide variety of global traveling exhibits. Each year, more than 20 exhibitions are hosted at the Kunsthal, the most notable of which has been the 2013 exhibit ‘The fashion world of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the catwalk’. The box-shaped building holds seven exhibition spaces, which are accessible via a sloping and spiraling floor. Designed by Rem Koolhaas, the Kunsthal building is often referred to as a work of art itself, as Koolhaas opted to give the museum an industrial look using corrugated plastic, raw concrete, galvanized steel, and roughly sawn tree trunks- materials that have never been used to build art galleries before. 

Erasmus Bridge

Erasmus Bridge is an important Rotterdam landmark. Stretching 802 meters, the bridge crosses the Nieuwe Maas and connects the north and south of Rotterdam. Completed in 1996, Erasmus Bridge is a great way to reach one side of the city from the other, and is especially beautiful at night when it is illuminated. It was named after Christian Renaissance humanist Desiderius Erasmus, otherwise known as Erasmus of Rotterdam. 

Image by Luke Price

Rotterdam boat tour

Rotterdam is a major port city, and the best way to tour the ports is via boat. There are many different companies that offer boat tours, with some offering dining options. Each tour provides an in-depth tour of the ports and a history of Rotterdam. A boat tour is a perfect way to see the highlights of Rotterdam, in a comfortable and intimate way, whilst learning about the amazing city. Most tours last roughly 75-90 minutes, so make sure to block out a good portion of your day to enjoy the tour. 

Image by Guilhem Vellut

The Witte Huis

Standing proudly at 43 meters tall, The Witte Huis (White House) was Europe’s first skyscraper. Built in 1898, it was formed using white-glazed brick and decorated with Art Nouveau mosaics and statues. On the 14th of May 1940, it was one of the only buildings in Rotterdam to survive a German bombing. It now serves as a national monument and is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Visitors to the building can enjoy a relaxing drink in the Grand Café Het Witte Huis, located on the ground floor of the building. 

Image by Fred Romero

Luchtsingel Bridge

Luchtsingel Bridge was the world’s first crowdfunded public infrastructure project. The 400-meter long bridge connects the center of Rotterdam to Rotterdam North, a relatively vacant and neglected area of the city. The bridge was funded by over 8,000 people who donated to fund the construction. Every person who donated €25 has had their names permanently engraved on the wooden boards of the bridge as a sign of thanks. 

Delfshaven

Delfshaven is a beautiful historic town located in the west of Rotterdam. When Rotterdam was bombed during World War 2, Delfshaven was not hit, which has meant that much of the town’s original infrastructure still remains. Asides from its war history, Delfshaven is also famous for being the port from which the pilgrims departed for their voyage to America. As you discover the history of Delfshaven, you can enjoy the multitude of quaint cafes and restaurants in the area. Delfshaven is a welcome escape from the hustle and bustle of Rotterdam’s center. 

Floating Forest

The Floating Forest is the very first of its kind. Floating in the port of Rotterdam, it was created by the cultural association Mothership and is based on the artwork ‘In Search of Habitus’ by Jorge Bakker. The forest consists of 20 Dutch elm trees, which stand tall on recycled buoys. The aim of the project is to lower CO2 emissions in Rotterdam, whilst creating a visual impact that shows the contrast between nature and the city. It is truly a sight to behold, made better by its impact on saving the environment

Image by GraphyArchy

Rotterdam is home to some truly spectacular sights. Whilst you enjoy these sights, we will enjoy dry cleaning your laundry. To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Stockholm fun facts

Image by Pedro Szekely

Stockholm is made up of 14 islands that are connected by 57 bridges. It is the capital of Sweden and home to over 975,000 people. But, there is more to Sweden’s capital than just this. 

  • Stockholm’s origins
  • UNESCO World Heritage sites
  • 24-hour sun
  • Swedish meatballs
  • A long and happy life
  • Narrowest street
  • Land of cyclists
  • Gamla Stan
  • The longest art gallery in the world
  • An environmentally conscious city

Stockholm’s origins 

Stockholm was founded by Birger Jarl, who used the city to block off the water passage between Lake Mälaren and the Baltic Sea. The first mention of Stockholm was in 1252, in a letter written by Birger Jarl. Within 100 years, Stockholm became the largest settlement in Sweden. 

Image by Stefan Lins

UNESCO World Heritage sites

Stockholm is home to two UNESCO World Heritage sites- the Royal Palace Drottningholm and The Woodland Cemetery. The Royal Palace is the private residence of the Swedish royal family and a popular tourist attraction. It was added to the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1991. Skogskyrkogården, otherwise known as The Woodland Cemetry, was added to the UNESCO list in 1994 for its groundbreaking design, which has influenced the designs of burial sites around the world. 

Image by denisbin

24 hour sun 

The midnight sun is a natural phenomenon that occurs during the summer months in countries north of the Arctic Circle or south of the Antarctic Circle. In Sweden, this usually occurs during the second half of June, creating endless daylight for weeks at a time. 

Photo by Jonathan Petersson from Pexels

Swedish meatballs

Swedish meatballs are small balls made from a 50-50 ratio of ground pork and ground beef. They are often seasoned with nutmeg, allspice, and white pepper, and served with boiled potatoes and gravy. Shockingly though, Swedish meatballs did not originate in Sweden. In the early 18th century, King Charles XII brought the recipe back to Sweden from his travels in Turkey. 

Image by anokarina

A long and happy life 

Sweden has the 13th highest life expectancy in the world with the average Swede living to 83 years old. This long life expectancy is due to Sweden’s commitment to being environmentally friendly, their healthcare system, which is one of the highest-ranking in the world, and the sense of community found in Sweden. 

Image by Marie Sjödin from Pixabay

Narrowest street

The narrowest street in Stockholm is Mårten Trotzigs alley which, at its slimmest part, is a mere 89 centimeters wide. The alley is named after merchant Mårten Trotzig, who immigrated to Stockholm in 1581, where he became one of the richest merchants in Stockholm. 

Image by Guillaume Capron

Land of cyclists

Over 70 thousand people in Stockholm bike around the city every day. Stockholm is known for its beautiful architecture and luscious green parks, so biking around Stockholm is incredibly peaceful and serene, especially during the spring and summer months. If you choose to ride your bike on the road, there are even dedicated bike lanes to prevent traffic collisions.

Gamla Stan

Gamla Stan is Stockholm’s old town. It dates back to the 13th century and can be defined by its medieval alleyways, cobbled streets, and archaic architecture. Nestled within Gamla Stan you can find the Royal Palace, Stockholm Cathedral, and the Nobel Museum. The towns winning combination of historical buildings and architecture, coupled with its idyllic scenery has transformed Gamla Stan into a popular tourist destination. 

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The longest art gallery in the world 

Stockholm’s subway system is commonly referred to as the longest art gallery in the world because of the beautiful paintings and mosaics that adorn the walls. 90 of the 100 stations are currently decorated with the work of 150 artists. 

Photo by Jan Židlický from Pexels

An environmentally conscious city

Sweden is an environmental pioneer. It was the first country in the world to pass an environmental protection act and was the host of the first UN conference on the global environment. More than half of the countries national energy supply comes from renewable sources, and by 2045 Sweden wants to become completely fossil-free. Sweden is doing everything it can to save our planet and set an example for countries across the world. 

Photo by Min An from Pexels

Stockholm is an incredibly interesting city, worthy of exploring. It is also just one of the international cities that Laundryheap operates in. To book your Laundryheap Stockholm service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to stay active in LA

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Staying active keeps both the body and mind healthy. LA is overflowing with fun and entertaining ways to stay active, sometimes without even realizing it. 

  • Hiking
  • Surfing 
  • Running
  • Walking
  • Yoga 

Hiking 

The best way to see LA is to take a hike and observe the city from above. Due to the mountains and forests that surround Los Angeles, there is an abundance of hiking trails, both for beginners and advanced hikers. To view LA in its entirety, you can hike to Griffith Park, or, if it’s a sea view you are after, try Corral Canyon Park. Hiking is an incredible form of exercise. Not only does it get your body moving, but the different landscapes and terrain you encounter on your journey keep your mind sharp and alert. Above all, hiking is an excellent chance to escape in nature, and find some peace away from the bustling city below. 

Image by April K

Surfing

LA has several amazing beaches, the most notorious of which is Santa Monica. Surfing is amazing for both cardio and strength fitness. Paddling out to sea will strengthen your back and shoulders, whilst riding waves strengthens your core and leg muscles. If you have never surfed before, but are eager to give it a go, there are plenty of services across LA that offer surf lessons, both one-on-one and in small groups. For beginners, El Porto in El Segundo is a great beach to begin surfing, and Sunset Beach off of the Pacific Coast Highway attracts a massive amount of surfers of all levels.

 Running

Whether you like running with a sea-view, or prefer more of a concrete-jungle experience, LA comes with plenty of stunning running locations. For sea-views, you can run from Santa Monica to Venice beach (5 miles), or head to Palisades Park (3 miles). Griffith Park, one of the largest urban parks in the US, spreads out over 4,300 acres of land, perfect for running on. There are countless running trails that you can take, however, the 6.3 miles Canyon Drive Trail, which takes you to the Hollywood sign, is one of the most popular. Running is a fantastic way to improve cardiovascular health, release mood-improving endorphins, and see the amazing city of LA.

Walking

If running isn’t really your thing, walking for just 30 minutes a day can improve the circulation in your body, strengthen your muscles, and release endorphins. All of the LA running trails available you can also walk, just look out for runners! LA is overflowing with incredible sights, such as the Hollywood Walk of Fame, which can be walked to and around. Even strolling down Santa Monica or Venice beach will up your step count. There are so many incredible things to see and do in LA, that you won’t even realise the amount you have walked in just one day. 

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Yoga

Yoga is incredible at improving strength and flexibility, whilst providing a few moments of reflection and calmness. Across LA, you can find either free or donation-run yoga classes. From Runyon Canyon to Echo Park, these free classes are run by professional yoga instructors, and are just as effective as $25 yoga classes. Free yoga classes are often day and time specific, so it’s best to do some research before heading to one. 

Photo by Artem Beliaikin from Pexels

Whilst you are keeping active in LA, we will be keeping active by doing your laundry. To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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The parks of Copenhagen

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Wherever you are in Copenhagen, you will be no more than 15 minutes away from a park- this is part of what makes it a green city. These are just 5 of our favourite Copenhagen parks. 

  • Frederiksberg Have
  • Amaliehaven
  • Kongens Have
  • Botanical Garden
  • Bibliotekshaven

Frederiksberg Have

Nestled within Frederiksberg Have you can find a Chinese summer house, 7-meter waterfall, and, overlooking the grounds, the Frederiksberg Palace, where Frederik VI resided in the 1700s. Whilst living in the palace, Frederik VI would be rowed about on the canals that flow through the grounds. Today, you can take a guided tour of the very same canals, and observe the grand gardens from the water, before exploring them on foot. After exploring the gardens, sit on the luscious grass and enjoy a picnic in the sun.

Amaliehaven

Located between Amalienborg, the royal residence of Queen Margrethe II, and Copenhagens waterfront, Amaliehaven is a green oasis. The garden was designed by Belgian landscape architect Jean Delogne. His rectangular design of the green space contrasts perfectly with the natural curves of the flowering plants within the garden. The crowning glory of Amaliehaven is the large fountain in the center of the space, which provides the perfect location to sit and breathe away from the city. 

Kongens Have

Established in the early 17th century, Kongens Have is the oldest park in Copenhagen. Originally serving as the private gardens for King Christian IV’s Rosenborg Castle, the park is now visited by roughly 2.5 million people every year. Despite having been renovated several times, three of the original entrances to Kongens Have remain, as does the Hercules Pavillon, and statue of renowned author Hans Christian Andersen. During the summer months, the park becomes crowded with tourists and locals alike eager to catch some sun. 

Image by Kristoffer Trolle

Botanical Garden

Containing over 13,000 species of plants, the Botanical Garden can be found in the center of Copenhagen. Covering an area of 10 hectares, it is home to an array of Danish, perennial, and annual plants, as well as a rock garden housing plants found in mountainous areas in Central and Southern Europe. First established in 1600, the Botanical Garden was moved twice before given its permanent location in 1870. Amongst the array of astoundingly beautiful plants, there are 27 historical glasshouses. The most notable of these glasshouses is the Old Palm House, which was built in 1874. 

Bibliotekshaven

Bibliotekshaven is the garden of the Royal Danish Library. Originally, the land was used as a naval harbour which connected to the main harbour via a small canal. When the navy was moved to Holmens Kanal, the harbour was filled in. In honour of its maritime origins, there is a small pond in the middle of the garden, and an old mooring ring, not dissimilar to the ones used by ships in the 17th and 18th centuries, built into the masonry at the end of the garden. Visitors to the garden can observe the flowers changing with the seasons sitting comfortably on benches nestled across the grounds. 

Spend less time doing your laundry, and more time enjoying the parks around you, by letting Laundryheap sort your washing for you. To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.