Laundryheap Blog – Laundry & Dry Cleaning

Same-day collection. Free delivery in 24 hours.


Leave a comment

Top 5 Copenhagen day trips

Photo by Daniel Jurin from Pexels

Copenhagen is a beautiful city, overflowing with things to do and places to explore. It is also surrounded by wonderful places for day visits. 

  • Helsingør 
  • Odense 
  • The outskirts of Copenhagen
  • Møn
  • Malmö

Helsingør 

The historical city of Helsingør is just an hour train journey from Copenhagen. The city’s most visited attraction is Kronborg Castle, made famous for being the setting of the Shakespeare play Hamlet. You can tour the castle on several routes, both free and payable options available, and immerse yourself in the rich history the castle has to offer. Once you’ve explored Kronborg Castle, wander around Helsingør. Attractions within the city include the Maritime Museum of Denmark, the Culture Yard, and the Danish Museum of Science and Technology. 

Image by Olivier Bruchez

Odense

Hans Christian Anderson is arguably the most famous fairy tale writer in the world. His birthplace of Odense is reachable within an hour, by train, from Copenhagen. As you wander the old cobbled streets you can visit the house where the famous fairy tale writer grew up. Afterwards, take a look around the Hans Christian Anderson House Museum which offers an immersive look into the fairy tales Anderson wrote. Odense has a strong cycling culture, so why not hire a bike to see the sights the city has to offer. There are public bicycle pumps across the city and plenty of bike-designated parking spots for when you want to take a break

Image by Elgaard

The outskirts of Copenhagen

The outskirts of Copenhagen are surrounded by lush forests and water. Hidden amongst this serene setting are six wooden giants for you to find. Created by artist Thomas Dambo, each giant is made from recycled wood which allows the structures to blend seamlessly into their scenic surroundings. Hunting for the six giants is the perfect activity for those who crave adventure and enjoy escaping from urban life. You will need a car to travel to each giant’s location, however, it may be worth doing some additional sightseeing as you journey to each structure. To find the exact location of each giant head to Thomas  Dambo’s website. 

Image by Lars Plougmann

Møn

Just under two hours South of Copenhagen you will find the island of Møn. Home to sweeping sandy beaches, secret coves, and, its main attraction, Møns Klint. Møn is a breath-taking island you may never want to leave. Møns Klint is the 70 million years old chalk cliffs on the island that are gently crumbling into the Baltic Sea, making the water crystal clear. You can view the cliffs, and enjoy the water, by hiring a kayak or fishing boat for the day. Alternatively, you can enjoy a ride on an Icelandic pony or take one of the two mountain bike trails 820km to the top of Møns Klint. 

Image by Image by Jenny Shead from Pixabay 

Malmö

In just 38 minutes you can go from one country to another. Take a quick trip to Malmö Sweden, a charming city full of culture, incredible architecture, and great food. Whilst in Malmö don’t miss out on seeing The Turning Torso, Scandinavia’s tallest building. At the foot of the Turning Torso, you will find a beach and harbour, perfect for a leisurely stroll. After visiting The Turning Torso, head to Malmö Saluhall, a food market overflowing with delicious artisanal goods. Here you can try Fika, the Swedish version of afternoon tea, where you will be served a variety of delicious cakes and coffee

Image by Alex Waltner from Pixabay 

Copenhagen, and its surrounding areas, should be explored to the fullest. Don’t let laundry get in the way, let us do it for you. Head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your laundry and dry cleaning service today.


Leave a comment

Copenhagen must-see sights

Image by City Clock Magazine

When you are visiting a country for only a small amount of time, it can be hard to prioritse what you should see and what you can miss. If you are visiting Copenhagen, these are the sites you should not be missing out on. 

  • Tivoli Gardens 
  • Christiansborg Palace
  • Nyhavn Harbour
  • The Round Tower
  • The Little Mermaid
  • Torvehallerne Food Market
  • Frederik’s Church
  • Rosenborg Castle 
  • The Wooden Skyscraper 
  • Bakken 

Tivoli Gardens

The magic of Tivoli Gardens is a Copenhagen site that you would be devastated to miss. Since its opening in 1843, Tivoli Gardens has been delighting visitors of all ages with its beautiful architecture, lush gardens, and, at night, twinkling lights that add to the fairy tale atmosphere. Walt Disney himself even visited Tivoli Gardens and said that it was his inspiration for Disney World. Whether you are a thrill-seeker looking to ride the rollercoasters, or you’re more interested in taking in the beautiful architecture and gardens, there is something to please everyone at Tivoli Gardens. 

Image by Charlie

Christiansborg Palace

If you want to experience 800 years of history in one day then head to Christiansborg Palace. Although most of the palace is open for visitors to tour, it is still home to the Danish parliament, the Prime Ministers office, and the Supreme Court, and some rooms are still occupied by the Royal Family. With every ticket for the Royal Reception Rooms, you will be given a free guided tour of the palace. Even if you don’t want to explore the inside, the outside of the palace is just as beautiful. 

Image by Jorge Franganillo

Nyhavn Harbour

Nyhavn was once a busy commercial port where ships from across the world would dock. Today, you can find hoards of people relaxing, drinking, and enjoying jazz music in restaurants that line the port. The old houses of Nyhavn, some of which fairy tale writer Hans Christian Anderson occupied, have been renovated and in their place stand brightly coloured homes that paint the perfect picture of happiness. If you’re looking for somewhere to drink, eat good food, and enjoy a relaxing day, then look no further than Nyhavn Harbour.

Image by E_Scott from Pixabay

The Round Tower

Built in 1642, The Round Tower is a 36-meter-high building that offers incredible views of the Old Town of Copenhagen. The tower was built by Christian IV in a time when Denmark was renowned for its astronomical achievements, thanks to Tycho Brahe. When Brahe died, Christian IV built The Round Tower to encourage astronomers to carry on Brahe’s work. Today, it is still used by amateur astronomers, but is used more to get panoramic views of the Old Town. Be warned, to get to the viewing platform you must walk up a spiral staircase, but, if the staircases hasn’t already, the view at the top will take your breath away. 

Image by Maria Eklind

The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid has become an iconic landmark in Copenhagen. Based off of the Hans Christian Anderson tale of the same name, the statue sits by the waterside at the Langelinie promenade, and depicts a human turning into a mermaid. It was commissioned in 1909 by Carl Jacobsen, who had become fascinated by a ballet based on the tale. Edvard Eriksen sculpted the piece, and the grand unveiling took place in August 1913. It has since become a symbol for Copenhagen in the same way at the Statue of Liberty has for New York, and tourists flock to the statute to take pictures. You may be waiting a while to see the mermaid, but you wouldn’t want to miss it. 

Photo by C1superstar from Pexels

Torvehallerne Food Market

Conveniently situated close to Nørreport Station, Torvehallerne Food Market is one of Copenhagen’s most popular markets. With more than 80 shops to browse, you can find everything from traditional Danish food to local vegetables and fresh fish. It’s the perfect place to stroll around at your leisure, try some samples, and enjoy what produce Copenhagen has to offer. 

Image by Heather Cowper

Frederik’s Church

Nicknamed The Marble Church, Frederik’s Church is one of the most impressive buildings in Copenhagen. Located in Frederiksstaden, the foundation stone of the church was laid in 1749, but the project was not completed until 1894. The building itself is incredibly striking, with a copper green dome that juxtaposes the delicate white marble beautifully. Inside the church is equally as delightful, so it is no surprise that couples are desperate to get married here. The church room is open to the public, as is the dome which offers draw-dropping views of Copenhagen. 

Image by Tony Webster

Rosenborg Castle 

Built as a country summer house by Christian IV 400 years ago, Rosenborg Castle offers visitors the chance to travel back in time and explore the grandeur of Christian IV life. After exploring the pomp and pageantry of the castle, visitors can roam the Kongens Have (the Kings Garden), the oldest royal garden in Denmark. Estimated to attract 2.5 million visitors every year, these gardens are a popular retreat for tourists and locals alike. Sit on the lush green grass, wander the paths, and feel like a true royal for the day.

Image by Steve Barker from Pixabay

The Wooden Skyscraper 

An hour south of Copenhagen, standing in the Gisselfeld Klosters Forest, you will find Denmark’s Wooden Skyscraper. What appears to be a structure right out of a Hans Christian Anderson fairy tale, is a 45 meter tall observation tower, completed with a spiralling walkway for easy access. Made from weathered steel and local oak, the structure blends seamlessly into the surrounding forest environment. Once you reach the top, you will be treated to views of rolling hills, lakes, and, on a clear day, Copenhagen. Although you have to travel an hour outside of the city to reach the structure, the spectacular view, both on the way up and from the top, is worth it.

Image by Stig Nygaard

Bakken 

Located in the woods of Dyrehaven you will find Bakken, the oldest amusement park in the world. Founded in 1853, Bakken has been delighting visitors of all ages for centuries. Whether you are a thrill seeker looking to ride rollercoasters, or you want to stroll around the independent stalls, there is something for everyone. Whilst visiting, look out for Pjerrot, the white-faced clown who has been delighting visitors since the parks opening. 

Image by J M Rice

With so many amazing sights in Copenhagen, the last sight you want to see is your laundry pile. Luckily, we can take care of that for you. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to make your booking today. 


Leave a comment

The parks of Copenhagen

Image by Better Than Bacon

Wherever you are in Copenhagen, you will be no more than 15 minutes away from a park- this is part of what makes it a green city. These are just 5 of our favourite Copenhagen parks. 

  • Frederiksberg Have
  • Amaliehaven
  • Kongens Have
  • Botanical Garden
  • Bibliotekshaven

Frederiksberg Have

Nestled within Frederiksberg Have you can find a Chinese summer house, 7-meter waterfall, and, overlooking the grounds, the Frederiksberg Palace, where Frederik VI resided in the 1700s. Whilst living in the palace, Frederik VI would be rowed about on the canals that flow through the grounds. Today, you can take a guided tour of the very same canals, and observe the grand gardens from the water, before exploring them on foot. After exploring the gardens, sit on the luscious grass and enjoy a picnic in the sun.

Amaliehaven

Located between Amalienborg, the royal residence of Queen Margrethe II, and Copenhagens waterfront, Amaliehaven is a green oasis. The garden was designed by Belgian landscape architect Jean Delogne. His rectangular design of the green space contrasts perfectly with the natural curves of the flowering plants within the garden. The crowning glory of Amaliehaven is the large fountain in the center of the space, which provides the perfect location to sit and breathe away from the city. 

Kongens Have

Established in the early 17th century, Kongens Have is the oldest park in Copenhagen. Originally serving as the private gardens for King Christian IV’s Rosenborg Castle, the park is now visited by roughly 2.5 million people every year. Despite having been renovated several times, three of the original entrances to Kongens Have remain, as does the Hercules Pavillon, and statue of renowned author Hans Christian Andersen. During the summer months, the park becomes crowded with tourists and locals alike eager to catch some sun. 

Image by Kristoffer Trolle

Botanical Garden

Containing over 13,000 species of plants, the Botanical Garden can be found in the center of Copenhagen. Covering an area of 10 hectares, it is home to an array of Danish, perennial, and annual plants, as well as a rock garden housing plants found in mountainous areas in Central and Southern Europe. First established in 1600, the Botanical Garden was moved twice before given its permanent location in 1870. Amongst the array of astoundingly beautiful plants, there are 27 historical glasshouses. The most notable of these glasshouses is the Old Palm House, which was built in 1874. 

Bibliotekshaven

Bibliotekshaven is the garden of the Royal Danish Library. Originally, the land was used as a naval harbour which connected to the main harbour via a small canal. When the navy was moved to Holmens Kanal, the harbour was filled in. In honour of its maritime origins, there is a small pond in the middle of the garden, and an old mooring ring, not dissimilar to the ones used by ships in the 17th and 18th centuries, built into the masonry at the end of the garden. Visitors to the garden can observe the flowers changing with the seasons sitting comfortably on benches nestled across the grounds. 

Spend less time doing your laundry, and more time enjoying the parks around you, by letting Laundryheap sort your washing for you. To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


Leave a comment

Fun facts about Denmark

The Scandinavian country of Denmark can be found in Northern Europe. Home to 5.8 million people, Denmark is the smallest of the Scandinavian countries. Here are 10 more fun facts about Denmark. 

  • A happy country
  • The oldest flag in the world
  • Danish pastries
  • Danish alphabet 
  • The oldest amusement parks in the world
  • Lego 
  • Copenhagen harbour 
  • Unofficial Danish law 
  • A bicycle nation 
  • Same-sex marriage

A happy country 

Denmark has held the title of the world’s happiest country on multiple occasions. According to the UN World Happiness Report for 2020, Copenhagen, the capital city of Denmark, is the 5th happiest city in the world. Why is Denmark such a happy country? According to The World Happiness Report, happiness is closely linked to social equality and community spirit, both of which Denmark has in abundance. 

The oldest flag in the world  

The Danish flag, ‘Dannebrog’, is the oldest state flag in the world that is still in use by an independent nation. It was first acknowledged in 1219 and can be seen across Denmark as a symbol of pride. The Dannebrog is often flown during celebrations such as birthdays and can even be seen on Christmas trees. 

Danish pastries 

This may come as a surprise, but Danish pastries are not actually Danish. In the 1840’s a group of Austrian bakers settled in Denmark and began making, what we all now know as, Danish pastries. In Denmark, they actually call Danish pastries wienerbrød or Viennese bread. 

Danish alphabet 

Danish is an incredibly complex language to learn. Not only are there an abundance of silent letters and difficult pronunciations, but there are also an additional three letters in their alphabet, Æ, Ø and Å. 

Image by Mira Cosic from Pixabay

The oldest amusement parks in the world

If you are in Denmark and looking for something fun to do, then you could visit the two oldest amusement parks in the world.

Originating in 1583, Bakken is the oldest amusement park in the world. Originally, people would flock from Copenhagen to bathe in the natural spring at the park, whilst being entertained by local performers. Nowadays you can visit vendors, watch a variety of entertainers, and enjoy the rides. What is more, entrance to the park is free. 

Tivoli Gardens is the second oldest theme park in the world. Opened in 1843, Tivoli Gardens is home to a variety of themed buildings, rides, and even a scenic railway. You can find the park a two-minute walk away from Copenhagen’s central train station. 

Image by Curtis Gregory Perry

Lego

The world-famous Lego brick was invented by Danish carpenter Ole Kirk Kristiansen in 1932. The name Lego is an abbreviation of ‘leg godt’, which means ‘play well’. The company has been passed down through the generations, and is now owned by Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen, grandchild of Ole Kirk Kristiansen. In Denmark you can explore the original Legoland, and learn more about the history of Lego at the Lego House. 

Copenhagen harbour    

In Denmark you are never more than 52km from the ocean. If you don’t fancy going to the beach, you can take a dip in Copenhagen harbour. There are a handful of harbour baths along Copenhagen’s harbour, such as Islands Brygge and Nordhavn. These baths are clean enough to enjoy a quick dip in.

Unofficial Danish law 

A key part of the Danish culture and mentality is that everyone is accepted and equal. The unofficial Danish law, ‘Janteloven’, dates back to a fictional book written by Norwegian author Axel Sandemose in 1933. The book is set in the Danish town of Jante, and narrates the unwritten social codes that the residents followed of living equally. These social codes reflected the way that the Danes did, and still do, maintain peace and acceptance in their country. 

A bicycle nation 

There are more bicycles in Denmark then there are people and, in Copenhagen, a person will cycle an average of 3 km a day. This adds up to cycling 35 times around the world every day. Many people in Demark cycle rather than drive because cars are taxed highly to discourage people from driving. Additionally, Denmark, as a country, is particularly flat, with the highest peak being 170m. 

Same-sex marriage 

Scandinavian countries are known for being progressive, and Denmark is no exception. In 1989 Denmark became the first country to legalise same-sex unions, and in 2012 they legalised same-sex marriage. Opinion polls in Denmark show that 86% of the public support same-sex marriage and unions.

At Laundryheap, we are very excited to have officially launched in Copenhagen. If you are in Copenhagen, book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app.