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Hacks for drying clothes

The quickest way to dry your clothes is by using a tumble dryer. For those who don’t have a tumble dryer, or are looking to save on their energy bill, these are our top hacks for drying your clothes. 

  • Invest in a clothes horse 
  • Use a fan 
  • Utilise the outdoors
  • Hang your clothing 
  • Use a hairdryer 
  • Don’t use radiators 

Invest in a clothes horse 

A clothes horse is lightweight, foldable and an energy-efficient way to dry your clothes. You can buy heated clothes horses for faster drying, however, the plastic ones work just as well. 

For the best results, hang your clothes neatly on the rungs of your clothes horse, making sure that they don’t bunch up or overlap. Place your smaller clothing, such as underwear, on the lower rungs and your larger items, such as shirts, higher up. When compared to a tumble dryer, it can take a longer time to dry your clothes using a clothes horse, which is why you want to ensure that air can flow efficiently. 

Place your clothes horse either outside or in a sunny, open, space indoors. If you are drying your clothes indoors, try to avoid placing your clothes horse in a living area as the room can become humid and encourage mould spores. To avoid this, invest in a dehumidifier or open a window to let the moisture out. 

Use a fan 

If you have decided to use a non-heated clothes horse but want your clothes to dry at a faster pace, try using a fan. Hang your clothing on your clothes horse and place it in an open and airy space. Position your fan nearby and put it on a high setting- make sure that your fan isn’t on too high a setting as you don’t want your clothes being blown off. Make sure that you rotate your fan every 30 minutes to ensure that all of your clothes are benefiting from the increased airflow the fan produces.

Utilise the outdoors 

Weather permitting, the best way to dry your clothes is by letting them dry naturally outside. Either hang your washing on a washing line or place your clothes horse on some stable ground outside. The natural breeze and fresh air will swiftly dry your clothes, plus, if the sun’s out it will warm your clothes in the same way as a tumble dryer. An added bonus to drying your clothes outside is that you will be left with fresher, cleaner, smelling clothing. 

Try to avoid hanging woolen clothing on washing lines as the weight of the wool, plus the excess water can drag the item downwards, causing it to become misshaped. Rather than drying outside, place your woollen items flat on a surface to dry.

Hang your clothing 

Whether you’re drying your clothes indoors or outdoors it’s always best to hang them at their full length. Hanging your clothes at full length will ensure that air can easily travel through the material, resulting in them drying faster. In addition, hanging your clothes up will prevent wrinkles, meaning less time spent ironing out creases, and stops your clothes from losing their shape. 

Use a hairdryer 

This hack is only useful for your smaller garments, such as underwear, socks, or hand towels. Begin by removing as much excess water as possible. You can do this by using a high spin cycle on your washing machine or by hand wringing your items. For the best result, set your hairdryer on a medium to high speed and medium heat. Remember, the hairdryer is to increase airflow, not temperature- if you use too high a heat setting you will damage the fibres in your clothing. Make sure you distribute the airflow of your hairdryer evenly, turning your items every few minutes until they are dry. 

Don’t use radiators

Using a radiator will dry your clothing in a timely manner, however, will cause damage. Exposing your clothing to the heat of a radiator will damage their fibres and cause them to weaken. In addition, placing your clothes on a radiator blocks the vents, causing the radiator to use more energy to heat your room/clothing, resulting in a higher gas bill.

If you want your clothes laundered, dried and delivered to you within 24 hours, book your slot with us today. Visit the Laundryheap website or download the Laundryheap app. Now servicing Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan.


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What is fast fashion doing to the environment?

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon from Pexels

We are becoming increasingly more aware of the damage that we are doing to the environment. We know that the sea levels are rising and we know that we need to work on our carbon footprint. But, do we know the damage that our clothes are causing the environment?

  • What is fast fashion?
  • What happens to our clothes in landfill sites?
  • How do our clothes pollute water?
  • What effect are our clothes having on the carbon footprint?
  • What are our clothes doing to natural habitats?
  • How can we help our planet?

What is fast fashion?

Fast fashion is the process of designing, making, and selling clothing as quickly and cheaply as possible. When there was once a new fashion range to reflect the four seasons of the year, there are now 52 ranges to reflect every week of the year. Fast fashion is cheap to buy, but comes at the price of being made from cheap materials that only last a few wears, and, more importantly, the deterioration of our environment. 

What happens to our clothes in landfill sites? 

A western family, on average, throws away 30 kg of clothing every year. 15% of that clothing is recycled or donated and the other 85% is taken to a landfill. 72% of fast fashion clothing is made from synthetic fibres, which are non-biodegradable. It can take up to 200 years for these fibres to decompose. As our clothing decomposes methane, a greenhouse gas, is emitted into the atmosphere. The rapid pace that we are throwing away clothing, coupled with the slow rate that clothes decompose, has resulted in landfills being inundated with clothing, emitting a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon. 

How do our clothes pollute the water?

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has calculated that the fashion industry uses 1.5 trillion litres of water every year. A 2017 report stated that the average water footprint for a kilo of cotton, equivalent to one pair of jeans and a t-shirt, was 10,000-20,000 litres. This water becomes wastewater, which contains toxic substances, such as lead, mercury and arsenic. It is extremely dangerous to aquatic life and has the potential to travel to the ocean, therefore polluting the water across the globe. 

Even washing our clothes is polluting the water. One washload of polyester can release 700,000 micro-plastic fibres into the environment, and an estimated 500,000 of those fibres end up in the ocean. Although small, micro-plastic fibres are a major contributor to the micro-plastic pollution in our seas and pose a threat to the livelihoods of aquatic animals. 

What effect do our clothes have on the carbon footprint?

The UN has stated that the fashion industry consumes more energy than the aviation and shipping industries combined. In addition, The Pulse report has predicted that fashion emissions will grow by 63% by 2030. 

Fast fashion monopolises on designing, producing and selling clothing at a rapid pace. As a result of this, the industry produces 10% of the worlds carbon dioxide emissions a year amongst other greenhouse gases. Synthetic fibres, made from fossil fuels, are constantly being used in fast fashion because they are cheaper than natural fibres. This makes the production of fast fashion clothing a lot more energy-intensive. In addition, a lot of our clothing is made in countries such as China, Bangladesh and India. These countries are mostly powered by coal, the dirtiest energy in terms of carbon emissions. Buying our clothing at the rate that we currently are is heightening the use of fossil fuels and increasing global warming through intense greenhouse gas emission.

What are our clothes doing to natural habitats? 

The fast fashion industry is a massive contributor to deforestation. In fact, 70 million trees are cut down a year to make clothes. Every year, thousands of hectares of endangered forestry is cut down and replaced by plantations of trees that are grown to make wood-based fabrics such as rayon. This loss of forest is threatening ecosystems, as well as the lives of indigenous people.

As well as deforestation, the fashion industry plays a major role in the degradation of soil. Cashmere goats and sheep are specifically mass-produced for their wool, leading to over pasteurisation. In addition, cotton is sprayed with chemicals to help it to grow, which leads to soil pollution and loss of land.

Image by crustmania

How can we help our planet?

Despite the damage that has already been done to our planet, we can prevent further damage from happening. Begin by using conscious fashion brands. These are brands that use environmentally friendly processes to design, produce and manufacturer their clothing. These brands tend to be more expensive to buy from, however, use higher quality materials to create long lasting clothing. Other than this, try to buy second-hand and recycle any of your unwanted clothing.

To prevent endorsing in fast fashion, make sure that you are looking after your clothing. Book your dry cleaning slot by visiting the Laundryheap website or by downloading our free app.


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How to remove ink stains

Ink stains are a potential outfit ruiner. Whether you’ve accidentally ran a ball-point pen over the sleeve of your best white shirt, or your children have decided to give your favourite skirt a new design, ink stains can be incredibly difficult to remove. Try these methods for removing them.

  • Cover in Salt
  • Apply liquid laundry detergent 
  • Blot with rubbing alcohol 
  • Spray with hairspray 
  • Soak in milk
  • Spread over with vinegar and corn starch

Cover in salt 

If you catch your ink stain before it has dried you are incredibly lucky because they are easier to remove than dried stains. To remove fresh ink stains, cover the stain in salt and dab gently with a wet paper towel. Brush off the salt and check to see if the stain has been removed. If the stain hasn’t been removed, repeat the process, or try an additional method explained in this post.

Apply liquid laundry detergent 

For a dried, water-based, ink stain a liquid laundry detergent is best to use. Begin by laying your stained item of clothing on a clean towel. Apply water to the stain and blot with a clean cloth. As you blot you should begin to see the ink transferring from your stained clothing onto the cloth. Once no more ink is being transferred onto the cloth, apply a small amount of liquid laundry detergent on what’s left of the ink stain. Leave it to soak in for three to five minutes. After three to five minutes, wash your clothing on the hottest setting advised on the care label. Before drying, check that the stain has been completely removed and, if not, complete the process again. 

Blot with rubbing alcohol 

Before beginning with this method you need to check that your clothing won’t be stained further by the rubbing alcohol. To do this, dab some rubbing alcohol onto the seam of your garment and wait to observe if a reaction occurs. If nothing happens, you are safe to begin.

Firstly, lay your stained item of clothing on top of a clean towel. Using a clean cloth blot your ink stain with rubbing alcohol, this will begin diluting the stain. Be aware that the towel underneath your garment may become wet with rubbing alcohol and stained with transferred ink. If this happens, replace the wet and stained towel with a fresh one to ensure that no ink is re-transferred on to your clothing. Continue dabbing your stain with rubbing alcohol until no ink is transferred onto the cloth. Once you’ve reached this point, wash off any rubbing alcohol residue. 

If you are treating a ball-point pen stain, rub a small amount of liquid laundry detergent on to the stain and leave it for three to five minutes. Wash off the detergent and observe whether the stain has been removed. 

Before moving forwards, observe whether the blotting and liquid detergent has been successful in removing the ink stain. If so, wash your garment on the hottest wash suggested on your clothing items care label. If the stain has not been successfully removed, mix a solution of oxygen-based bleach and cool water. Completely submerge your clothing in the solution and leave it to soak for 8 hours. If your stain has still not been removed, make a new solution, and leave your clothing for another 8 hours. This should remove the stain, and leave your clothing ink free.

Spray with hairspray 

Most hairsprays contain alcohol which is incredibly useful when dissolving ink and removing ink stains. The higher the alcohol content in the hairspray, the more effective it will be in removing the stain- often the cheaper hairsprays have the highest alcohol content.

Lay your stained garment on a clean towel, and thoroughly spray the stain. Blot the stain with a clean cloth until the stain has been removed. Once removed, wash your clothing according to the advice on your garments care label. If the stain has not been removed, repeat the process.

Image by Andrew Magill

Soak in milk

If you have time for a more time-consuming ink stain removal method this could be the solution for you. Fill a bowl with enough milk to completely submerge your ink stain. Place your stained clothing in the milk and leave it overnight to soak. Remove your clothing in the morning and observe whether the stain has been removed. If your stain has been removed, wash your garment as normal. If your stain has not been removed, repeat the process, or perhaps try one of the other methods suggested in this post.

Spread over with vinegar and cornstarch 

Begin this process by laying your damaged item on a clean towel and soaking your stain with vinegar. Whilst the vinegar begins breaking down the ink, mix two parts vinegar with three parts cornstarch until a paste has formed. Once you have reached paste consistency, spread it over the ink stain and leave it to completely dry. Once your paste has dried, wash your item as you normally would. 

If these methods aren’t successful in removing your ink stain, leave it to us to remove. Book your slot by visiting the Laundryheap website or by downloading the Laundryheap app.  


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How to plan the perfect wedding

Image by Norma Dorothy

Wedding planning can be incredibly stressful, but it’s important to note that there is no such thing as ‘the perfect wedding.’ As long as your wedding is perfect for you and your partner, it will be perfect.

The current pandemic we are facing may have put your wedding on hold, but there is no reason why you can’t take this time to meticulously plan your special day. Here’s how.

  • Be organised
  • Involve your significant other 
  • Ask for help 
  • Set a budget
  • Save a date 
  • Choose a colour scheme 
  • Create a guest list 
  • Buy your perfect outfit 
  • Capture the moment 
  • Don’t forget to have fun

Be organised 

When planning a wedding there is a lot of things to think about. From choosing a venue to considering what floral arrangements you want, you have to consider the smallest of details. To ensure that you achieve your perfect day, it’s best to organise your ideas as soon as possible. Create mood boards for the different aspects of your wedding to narrow down your initial ideas. Create a check-list of things that need to be completed before your big day. Split your to-do list up into monthly tasks to make the list more manageable, setting yourself goals on what you want to achieve leading up to your special day. Preparation is key to achieving your perfect wedding, the more organised you are the easier it will be to achieve your perfect day.

Image by Natasha Fernandez from Pexels

 Involve your significant other 

Your big day should be the perfect amalgamation of yours and your significant other’s vision. Your guests should see both of you reflected in every aspect of your wedding. That is why it is vital that you include your partner in the wedding planning. Discuss exactly what the vision for your wedding is and build your to-do list together. Then, divide your tasks between yourselves. This will make it easier to get through the wedding prep and ensure that your wedding is prefect for both of you.

Ask for help 

Planning a wedding is hard and you should not be taking on the challenge on your own. Enlist the help of family and friends to help you make decisions and organise your special day. You could even enlist the help of a wedding planner who will take your vision for your perfect wedding and organise everything, with your oversight of course. This can drastically lessen the stress you may feel and make the process more enjoyable. 

Set a budget 

Weddings can be incredibly expensive, so it’s essential to set a realistic budget. Take into consideration what you want from your wedding, what you have to pay for and what you can realistically afford. Your budget may limit what can be achieved for your big day, but the sooner you establish what you can afford the easier it will be to plan your special day. 

Image by Norma Dorothy

Save a date

Given the current situation, it’s near impossible to pin down an exact date for your wedding. That being said, you can decide what season, and maybe even month, you would like to be married in. This will give you a realistic time-frame of when you need to start preparing for your big day.

Choose a colour scheme    

After you’ve established what season your wedding will take place in, it may be easier to choose a colour scheme. For example, a winter wedding could have a darker colour scheme than a summer wedding. Consider the colours that you and your significant other like. Are there any colours that you feel signify your relationship? After picking a colour scheme, you can begin planning floral arrangements, place settings, decorations- all of the smaller things that will bring your wedding together.

Image by tree2mydoor

Create a guest list

Once you’ve decided on your venue and your wedding date, you can begin considering who will be on your guest list. Think about who you want as part of your bridal and groom squad and work from there. The more time you give yourself and your partner to consider the guest list the easier it will be to send out those final invitations without the fear of forgetting anyone. In addition, the sooner you send out your invitations the more time your guests will have to clear their schedules and save your date. 

Buy your perfect outfit 

One of the most important parts of anyone’s big day is their outfit. You want to look perfect. Take your time looking for an outfit. Browse all your options and don’t rush into a decision. It doesn’t matter if you have to visit 10 shops, try on 100 different looks and order a couple of back-up options online. It’s your big day and you should feel comfortable in whatever you decide to wear. Don’t forget to consider your shoes and accessories as well.

Capture the moment 

Your wedding day is one of the biggest days of your life and you will want to remember every moment of it. That is why it’s so important to get a good photographer and/or videographer. Take your time to look through the portfolios of multiple photographers and videographers and pick one with your dream style. You can even reach out to a handful of them and ask for additional samples of their work. Your wedding photos and video will serve as a reminder of your big day for the rest of your life, so you want to hire the best person for the job. 

Don’t forget to have fun 

Planning a wedding can be stressful. There are a lot of decisions to be made and a lot of planning to be done. That being said, don’t forget to have fun. Organise a crazy hen/stag night. Have your friends and family round for a planning party. Take this opportunity to have some quality time with your partner, orgnaising your perfect wedding. Most importantly, allow yourself to be excited. It’s your day and you should enjoy every moment of the process, planning included. 

Image by Vu Toan from Pixabay

We are here to help with all your pre and post wedding laundry needs. If you need your wedding dress dry cleaned, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free app to book your laundry slot. 


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When should you use fabric softener?

Fabric softener can be a very useful addition to your laundry routine, but it shouldn’t be used all the time. So, when should you use fabric softener?

  • What is fabric softener?
  • When do I add fabric softener?
  • Hard water areas
  • Bed linen
  • Keep clothes looking new 
  • Sensitive skin 
  • Clothes likely to bobble

What is fabric softener?

Before answering the question of when you should use fabric softener, we need to first understand what it is. To begin with, as the name implies, fabric softener softens your clothing and leaves it smelling fresh. Asides from this, it will strengthen the fabric of your clothing, therefore making your clothes easier to iron. 

When do I add fabric softener?

Many people believe that fabric softener should be added to your washing at the same time as detergent. This is incorrect. You should add your fabric softener during your rinse cycle. Adding softener during a wash cycle will remove the chemical residue that makes your clothing soft, therefore making it ineffective. 

Photo by Sher Lyn from Pexels

Fabric softener should be used for the following situations.

Hard water areas 

If you live in a hard water area, you may notice that your clothing comes out of the washing machine feeling rough. This is because the mineral content in hard water is high and attaches to the fibres in your clothing, making the fabric stiffer than in soft water areas. Adding fabric softener to your wash can remove some of those harsh minerals, resulting in softer clothing. 

Photo by Steve Johnson from Pexels

Bed linen 

Everybody loves crisp, soft, clean-smelling sheets. When washing your bed linen, add some fabric softener. The next time you get into bed you will be met with soft sheets and a heavenly smell that will make it even harder for you to get out of bed. 

Photo by Harry Page from Pexels

Keep clothes looking new 

It’s awful when you put your favourite jumper in the wash and it comes out unravelled and with a hole in it. Fabric softener smooths the fibres in your clothing, reducing the friction caused when washing, and therefore reducing wear and tear. Adding a small amount of fabric softener to your washing can prevent the loss of your favourite clothing, and keep your clothes looking newer for longer. 

Sensitive skin  

For those that suffer from sensitive skin, be careful with the fabric softener that you buy. Some softeners are perfumed and can, therefore, cause additional irritation. That being said, if you buy a sensitive skin friendly fabric softener, it can eliminate irritation caused by rough clothing rubbing against your skin. 

Image by NIAID

Clothes likely to bobble 

Bobbles on clothing can really damage the aesthetic of your favourite look. They occur when friction causes the fibres on the surface of your clothing to rub together, resulting in small, irritating, balls of loose fabric. Fabric softener strengthens the fibres in your clothing, preventing bobbling from occurring. Now, you can strut down the street in your best outfit, completely bobble free. 

If you’re still not sure when to use your fabric softener, leave it to us. Book your contactless delivery slot on the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Iconic launderette media moments

Image by zoetnet

Launderettes have been the settings of some of the most iconic scenes throughout TV and film history. Here are just 5 of our favourite iconic launderette media moments. 

  • 1994, Friends
  • 1998, Fight Club 
  • 2013, Anchorman 2
  • 1985-2016, Eastenders
  • 2017, Babydriver

1994, Friends 

Who can forget those early episodes of Friends? Ross was so desperate to spend time with Rachel he would do anything. Including spending the evening at a launderette. In “The One with the East German Laundry Detergent”, Rachel is in the midst of learning how to live on her own, away from her parents’ money. This includes being able to do her own laundry. When Ross accompanies her to the launderette, he teaches Rachel to stand up for herself against a woman trying to steal her washing machine. This earns Ross a completely platonic kiss and Rachel a new life skill- doing her own laundry. It was the beginning of their beautiful, and complicated, relationship.

Image by Geoffrey Chandler

1998, Fight Club 

The first rule of fight club is to not talk about fight club… but let’s talk about this iconic laundry scene anyway. Whilst Marla Singer, played by Helena Bonham Carter, is talking to the elusive Narrator, we see her head into a launderette. She goes to the washing machines, takes the clothes out, and then leaves. The Narrator follows her out, commenting on how she left half of her clothes in the shop. It’s then that we see her selling the stolen clothing to a thrift store. Next time you’re in a launderette, best keep an eye on your machine. 

Image by Scott Ellis

2013, Anchorman 2

Continuing on from Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy, everyone was ecstatic to see their favourite news team reassemble for Anchorman 2. In one scene from the squeal, we see the lovable idiot Brick Tamland take a perspective girlfriend on a first date… to a vending machine… in a launderette. Their whole date takes place in the launderette, where they drink cans of Dr Pepper from the vending machine. It may seem like an odd place for a date, but it worked for Brick as SPOILER ALERT- the two get married at the end of the film.

Image by Geoffrey Chandler

1985-Present Day, Eastenders 

The Launderette in Eastenders is ICONIC. It was Albert Square veteran Dot Branning’s workplace until 2016 and has been the home to some of Walford’s biggest bust-ups. From Ashley Cotton driving straight into the window in 2001 to countless fights and airing of dirty laundry. One of the most touching scenes was in 2016 when, after 55 years of working there, Dot Cotton resigned and left the Launderette for good. 

2017- Babydriver 

When getaway driver Baby meets Debora he wants to protect her from his life of crime. However, after settling the last of the money he owes mastermind Doc, he is free to live his life crime-free. He goes to the launderette with Debora and listens to music whilst waiting for their clothes. This mundane task signifies the beginning of their ordinary life together, away from Baby’s past life of crime. 

Image by BagoGames

If these top 5 launderette moments from film and TV are anything to go by it seems that there a lot of emotions expressed in launderettes. Best to just use the Laundryheap app to book your 24-hour, contactless, laundry delivery slot. 


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How to get rid of ironing stains

Marco Verch Professional Photographer and Speaker

Ironing stains are easily done and yet increasingly difficult to get rid of. Some ironing stains are unsalvagable and can only be aesthetically lighter rather than removed. These six methods will either help to lighten, or completely remove, ironing stains. 

  • Method 1- Bleach the stain 
  • Method 2- Soak in hydrogen peroxide
  • Method 3- Squeeze lemon juice over the stain 
  • Method 4- Soak in ice water 
  • Method 5- Rub with white vinegar 
  • Method 6- Use an emery pad

Method 1- Bleach the stain 

Before starting this method make sure that you check the stained items care label. Some clothing will come with a warning to not use bleach, in which case this method should not be used. 

Once you have checked the care label, soak your item in diluted bleach. After 15 minutes, remove the item and wash it as you usually would. To get the most effective result, dry in direct sunlight. The sun’s natural lightening abilities will help lighten the stain so at the very least the mark will be less visible.

Method 2- Soak in hydrogen peroxide 

Begin by laying the garment on a flat surface. Soak an old cloth or piece of fabric in hydrogen peroxide and place it on the iron stain. Next, put a clean, dry, cloth or piece of fabric on top of the hydrogen peroxide soaked material whilst you let your iron heat to a high temperature. Once your iron is hot, gently rub it over the top piece of fabric. The heat will gently permeate through to the hydrogen peroxide and help work it into the stain. As you iron make sure that you check the progress of the stain. If you notice that your bottom cloth is getting dry, apply more hydrogen peroxide to it. Likewise, if your top cloth is becoming damp with hydrogen peroxide switch it for a new, dry, cloth as this will prevent rust stains transferring from the iron. This process can take a while, so patience is key.

Method 3- squeeze lemon juice over the stain 

Squeeze the juice of one lemon over the stain until it’s completely soaked. Place your item of clothing in a container of hot water and let it sit for 15-30 minutes depending on how severe the stain is. Remove the clothing item and dry as normal. 

Method 4- Soak in ice water 

If your stain is mild soaking it in ice water for an hour could remove it. For this method, you need to ensure that your water is ice cold. To guarantee this either add ice cubes to cold water or leave your item in some water in the freezer. If you do leave your clothes in the freezer, make sure you only leave them in there for a maximum of 1 hour. Completely freezing your clothes won’t cause any additional damage, but can slow down the stain removing process. 

Image by Bruno /Germany from Pixabay

Method 5- Rub with white vinegar

If you decide on this method it’s important that you use white vinegar only- using any other type of vinegar could stain your clothing further. Soak a rag or sponge in white vinegar and rub it over the stain. Once the stain is completely soaked, leave the item to sit for 10-15 minutes before rinsing with cool water. Leave your clothing to dry as normal. 

Image by Willis Lam

Method 6- Use an emery pad  

A heavy scorch mark can not be removed, however the damage can be made less visible. Using an emery pad, or any rough material, gently rub the burn mark, removing any dark singed material. Be gentle with your rubbing movements, being too aggressive can cause further holes and damage to the material. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional Photographer and Speaker

If your clothing has been stained beyond repair and you are considering throwing out the item, try and reuse it for an alternative purpose. Consider making a tote bag or pillow case- anything to limit the clothing pollution that comes with throwing away clothing. 

The best way to treat any stain is by getting it treated at a dry cleaners. Book your slot on the Laundryheap website or by downloading the Laundryheap app. 


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Amsterdam fun facts

If being in self-isolation is leaving you yearning for a holiday more than ever, here are 10 fun facts about Amsterdam. The ideal post-isolation city break destination. 

  • Amsterdam got its name from the Amstel river
  • Amsterdam is the new capital of the Netherlands
  • Amsterdam lies below sea level
  • Amsterdam has over 100 canals
  • There are over 2,000 houseboats in Amsterdam
  • Amsterdam is home to dancing houses
  • Amsterdam’s tap water is safe to drink
  • Amsterdam is home to some of the most famous museums in the world
  • Amsterdam’s floating flower market 
  • Amsterdam’s tourists drastically outweighs its locals

Amsterdam got its name from the Amstel river 

Amsterdam was founded as a fishing village in the 12th century. The city grew around the Amstel river and was protected by a dam that prevented flooding from the  ZuiderZee (South Sea). Thus the name Amsterdam was given to the city as a combination of Amsel and Dam. 

Image by Giorgio Baresi

Amsterdam is the new capital of the Netherlands 

Amsterdam only became the official capital of the Netherlands in 1983. Prior to this, everyone assumed that Amsterdam was the capital but it was never official. Despite being the capital city of the Netherlands, Amsterdam isn’t the political capital. The Netherlands government buildings are actually housed in Hague.

Amsterdam lies below sea level 

Half of the Netherlands, including Amsterdam, is situated below sea level. In the 12th and 13th century, residents would dig ditches and remove water to pump windmills. This resulted in the ground getting progressively lower to the point where half of the Netherlands now remains 2 meters below sea level. Without the dikes and dunes that are enforced every year, the Netherlands would be submerged underwater.

Amsterdam has over 100 canals 

There are 165 canals across Amsterdam, which separate the city into 90 different islands. The majority of them were built in the 17th century, during the Dutch Golden Age. They now have a combined length of 100km. Amsterdam is notorious for its canals, so much so that the historic Canal Belt, or ‘Grachtengordel’ in Dutch, is one of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites. 

There are over 2,000 houseboats in Amsterdam  

Amsterdam’s canals are home to 2,500 houseboats, many of which have been afloat for centuries. Houseboats are either wooden or concrete, with the concrete ones being most desirable. If you own a wooden houseboat you are legally required to take it to a shipyard every three years for repairs and to be painted. The majority of the boats are residential, however, you can find hotel houseboats and even museum houseboats. 

Amsterdam is home to Dancing Houses

The Dancing Houses of Amsterdam are famous. Found on the edge of the Damrak canal these houses get their name from their crooked appearance. Originally built as both houses and offices for wealthy bankers, the soil these houses were built on was so swampy that they had to be built on stilts. This caused the houses to wobble and sink slightly, making them off-balance. The Dancing Houses are a regular tourist attraction and a highlight of Amsterdam. 

Amsterdam’s tap water is safe to drink 

Amsterdam’s tap water is the cleanest in the Netherlands. Above this, the Netherlands has the cleanest tap water in Europe. 

Amsterdam is home to famous museums

Not only is Amsterdam home to some of the most famous museums in the world, but it also has more museums per square meter than any other city. Famous figures, such as Anne Frank and Van Gough, have museums in Amsterdam, alongside the Rijksmuseum and the Amsterdam museum.

Image by emoro from Pixabay

Amsterdam’s floating flower market 

The Netherlands is well known for its flowers, specifically tulips. The iconic floating flower market of Amsterdam has been in business since 1862. It is now one of the most famous flower markets in the Netherlands. To this day, all the stalls of the market are located on boats as a remembrance to when flowers were delivered to the Netherlands by boat. 

Image by jimderda

Amsterdam’s tourists drastically outweigh its locals

Amsterdam is visited by roughly 14 million tourists per year. 4.5 million of these tourists travel from the Netherlands, with the rest travelling from around the globe. Amsterdam is home to only 821,000 residents, meaning that the tourists drastically outnumbers the locals. 

Another fun fact about Amsterdam is that Laundryheap operates from the city. If you are visiting Amsterdam and need your clothes laundered you can book your slot via the Laundryheap website or on the app. 


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Top ten wardrobe organisation tips

Photo by Victoria Borodinova from Pexels

Regardless of the size and shape of your wardrobe, there never seems to be enough room to tidily fit all of your clothes. These top ten wardrobe organisation tips will help you de-clutter and re-organise your wardrobe for optimum space and an aesthetically pleasing look. 

  • Have a clear-out 
  • Change your wardrobe with the seasons 
  • Deep clean your wardrobe
  • Hang your clothes by category 
  • Colour code your clothing 
  • Use coordinating hangers
  • Utilise shelving space
  • Use storage boxes
  • Maximise vertical storage space
  • Utilise empty wall space

Have a clear-out 

If your wardrobe is looking cluttered and disorganised the first thing to do is have a clear out. Take everything out- clothes, shoes, accessories, bags, and anything else you may have in there, and lay it all out on your bed. Sift through your items and throw out anything that you don’t want or need anymore. 

TOP TIP: If you’re finding it difficult to throw items away think about when the last time you have wore or used the item was. If it wasn’t in the last 6-12 months, and the item has no sentimental value, then throw it away. 

Rather than discarding your clothes in the bin, donate them to a local charity shop or clothing donation bin. If you no longer need the clothing for yourself, why not give it to someone less fortunate. 

De-cluttering your wardrobe of items you no longer wear or use will leave you with a much clearer wardrobe that is easier to navigate and more aesthetically pleasing to look at.

Photo by viviandnguyen_

Change your wardrobe with the seasons 

Your winter and autumn wardrobe will contain bulkier clothing, such as jumpers, whereas your summer and spring wardrobe will consist of thinner materials. The best way to utilise the space in your wardrobe is by alternating your clothing with the seasons. This means that you will have plenty of space in the autumn and winter for your bulkier clothing, and room to spare in the summer and spring with the absence of unnecessary items. Make sure that you store your clothing away properly to avoid ruining them.

Deep clean your wardrobe 

Every 3 months take everything out of your wardrobe and give it a deep clean. Wipe down all the walls and doors, hoover the bottom of it to get rid of any dust, and spray the inside of it with room spray. Not only will this leave your wardrobe gleaming from the outside, but it will also prevent your clothing from becoming unnecessarily dusty from being left in a dirty wardrobe. 

Hang your clothes by category

We’ve all been in that situation where you’re running late for something and can’t seem to find the right thing to wear. Endlessly flicking through your clothes, trying desperately to find something appropriate. Make it easier to find your perfect outfit by organising your clothes by category. Keep all of your trousers, shirts, jackets, etc. together. This will make it easier to see what clothes you have available to you and also make clothing combinations easier to figure out. 

Colour code your clothing 

If you want to go one step further from hanging your clothes by category, you may also want to hang your clothes by colour. If you are a particularly visual person, you may find it easier to pick your outfits by sourcing what particular items you want to wear by their colour. Not to mention, this will look incredibly visually effective when you open your wardrobe.

Use coordinating hangers

If you want to make your wardrobe look organised use the same coloured and sized hangers. Nothing screams wardrobe chaos more than clothes hung on an abundance of different sized and coloured hangers. Using the same hangers will make your wardrobe look more uniform and therefore more organised.

Utilise shelving space

If you have shelves in your wardrobe, or the space to install shelves, utilise that space. Use your shelves to stack heavy and bulky items that take up space in your wardrobe, but won’t lose their shape if folded and stacked. Stack jumpers, denim items and anything else that may take up a lot of wardrobe space.


Photo by Magnus D

Use storage boxes

If you have space in your wardrobe for storage boxes use that space. Use storage boxes to store everyday t-shirts, pyjamas, and work out outfits. These items are less likely to lose shape and become overly wrinkled, and will also save an abundance of room for other clothes to be hung up. Additionally, because these items tend to be made from thinner material you can store more items in a smaller space. 

Maximise vertical storage space

No matter the size and shape of your wardrobe, you will always have vertical space that you can utilise. If you don’t have any space to store your shoes, why not get a hanging shoe rack to put over your wardrobe doors. Alternatively, you can buy specialised hangers to hang accessories, belts, and scarves from. This can save on using individual hangers for individual scarves etc. Whatever vertical storage you have, make sure to utilise it as best as you can. 

Photo by Rubbermaid Products

Utilise empty wall space  

Not all clothing items need to be put in your wardrobe. If you own many scarves and belts, utilise your empty wall space and hang your accessories on the wall. You can do so by either using nails or investing in a wall holder. This will de-clutter your wardrobe of unnecessary accessories and make it easier for you to choose your accessory for the day.

Now that you’ve organised your wardrobe, let us dry clean your clothing. Book a slot using the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Dry cleaning myths debunked

There are a lot of dry cleaning myths. Here are 10 of them, debunked.

  • Dry cleaning is dry 
  • Dry cleaning makes clothes smell bad 
  • Dry cleaning is expensive 
  • Club soda can remove stains just as well as dry cleaning
  • Excessive dry cleaning wears out clothing
  • It’s fine to store clothes in plastic dry cleaning bags
  • Dry cleaning a suit will leave it shiny 
  • Dry cleaning helps clothes stay intact
  • Always adhere to ‘Dry Clean Only’ labels
  • There’s no need to dry clean a wedding dress

Dry cleaning is dry 

Despite the name, dry cleaning doesn’t actually mean that your clothes are cleaned whilst dry. Dry cleaning is called as such because water isn’t used in the process. Instead of water, a chemical solvent, with a lower viscosity than water, is used because of its effectiveness at removing grease-based stains whilst minimally disturbing the fibres on clothing.  

Dry cleaning makes clothes smell bad 

If your clothes are coming back from the dry cleaners smelling strongly of chemicals, it’s time to source a new launderette. The smell is a result of the solvent that replaces the water in the cleaning process not being left long enough to be completely removed. In addition, if your clothes have a lingering bad odour, it comes as a result of the launderette not using clean solvent. That means soil, sweat and anything else trapped in the fibres of your clothing is being redeposited rather than cleaned off. A good dry cleaner will always use clean solvent and know the appropriate time to leave the solvent in for in order to produce high-quality, clean clothing.

Dry cleaning is expensive

If you are consistently dry cleaning your clothes than the cost can begin adding up. If you are only dry cleaning the essentials, such as delicate items of clothing, or you build up a substantial amount of clothing, then dry cleaning is the most sensible option.

Image by moneycortex from Pixabay

Club soda can remove stains just as well as dry cleaning

Despite the speculation that club soda can remove stains from clothes, it can actually end up doing more damage than good. Rather than using club soda, dab the stain immediately with a white napkin. For the best result, take your stained clothing to a dry cleaners and inform them of the stain and what has caused it. That way, they can ensure the best treatment is used and the stain is more likely to be successfully removed.

Excessive dry cleaning wears out clothing

Continuously washing clothing will eventually wear out the colours and fibres of the item regardless of whether you use a dry cleaning service. Contrary to popular belief, dry cleaning your clothing will preserve your clothes for longer than using a regular wash. This is because dry cleaning solvent is lighter than water, and therefore travels through fabric in a much more delicate manner. 

It’s fine to store clothes in plastic dry cleaning bags 

Many people leave their clothing in the plastic bags that their dry cleaning comes in. This is very bad for your clothing. The reason that plastic bags are used for your dry cleaning is to prevent your clothes from being dirtied post-laundering. As soon as you get your clothing home, it is recommended to immediately take your items out of the plastic to allow your clothes to breathe. Leaving your clothes in the plastic bags could trap humidity and allow stains to oxidise and make the clothes harder to clean.

Dry cleaning a suit will leave it shiny

If your suit is looking shiny it is not a result of getting it dry-cleaned. The shininess of a suit comes from the fiction of wearing it day after day. That being said, if your dry cleaner is not sufficient at pressing suits you may notice some marks left behind. 

Image by Flazingo Photos

Dry cleaning helps clothes stay intact

As previously mentioned, because of the lack of water used, dry cleaning is gentler on your clothing. This is not to necessarily say that all of your clothing needs to be dry cleaned to help them stay intact. We recommend that you always read the care label on your clothing. There are some items that are labelled “do not dry clean” because they have a protective layer coating the fabric. If these items are dry cleaned your clothing will not stay intact for long.

Always adhere to “dry clean only” labels

 Care labels on clothing must be looked at so that you know how best to look after your clothing. More delicate fabrics, such as cashmere, will most likely come with a “dry clean only” label. It is always advisable to have delicate items of clothing dry-cleaned to avoid damage to the material, however, hand washing these items can sometimes work just as well. If you are hand-washing any delicate items remember to ALWAYS air dry your clothing to avoid damage to the fabric. 

There’s no need to dry clean your wedding dress 

For many people, their wedding dress will be worn on their wedding day and never again. If there are no visible stains on the dress, you may not see any reason to get it dry cleaned. Regardless of whether you can visibly see any stains, you should ALWAYS get your wedding dress dry cleaned. There will be sweat, deodorant and body oil stains on your dress from wearing it all day. Over time, these stains will turn a yellowish colour that will completely ruin your dress. Having your special dress dry cleaned will prevent this from happening so should you, or anyone else, wish to wear it again it will be just like new. 

Laundryheap is open for ALL of your dry cleaning needs. Simply head to our website or download the app to book your slot. We now offer a hot wash service and contactless delivery to limit the spread of Covid 19.