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Reduce, reuse, recycle whilst doing laundry 

Photo by Sarah Chai from Pexels

One of the most effective ways to lower our carbon footprint is to reduce, reuse, and recycle the items we use. That includes when we do our laundry

  • Reduce the amount of laundry you do
  • Reduce the temperature you wash at 
  • Reuse detergent bottles 
  • Reuse dryer balls and sheets
  • Recycle containers 
  • Recycle your clothing
  • How Laundryheap is doing their bit 

Reduce the amount of laundry you do

On average a washing machine uses 350 to 500 watts of electricity per hour. The average person does two loads of laundry per week, which translates to 36,400 to 52,000 watts of electricity in just one year. By reducing the amount of laundry you do you could half your yearly electricity usage. There are several ways to reduce your laundry load, including waiting until you have a full laundry basket, spot treating stains, and freezing your jeans.

Photo by Sarah Chai from Pexels

Reduce the temperature you wash at

Washing your laundry at 60 degrees will kill bacteria, but use 40% more energy than washing at 30 degrees. You may have noticed when shopping for laundry detergent that many brands now make cold wash detergents. These are detergents that work just as effectively at 30 degrees as they do at hotter temperatures, meaning that you can reduce the temperature you wash at without affecting the cleanliness of your laundry. Be aware that if you are laundering items that are stained it is best to pre-treat them before washing at 30 degrees. 

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Reuse detergent bottles

Once you have used your laundry detergent, don’t throw your bottles away, reuse them. There are a multitude of ways that you can reuse detergent bottles, including making a watering can, a bird feeder, or weights. You can even use your empty detergent bottle to store homemade laundry detergent. Just remember that before you reuse your detergent bottles you need to make sure that they are fully rinsed out. 

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Reuse dryer balls and sheets

Dryer balls and sheets are used to reduce the drying time of your laundry, meaning that you use less energy per load. Rather than using one-use dryer balls and sheets, invest in reusable options. They may be slightly more expensive, but will save you money in the long run. To be even more environmentally conscious you can make your own dryer balls using tin foil or old clothing. 

Image by mjtmail (tiggy)

Recycle containers

If you don’t want to reuse your detergent bottles, make sure that you recycle them as well as your other laundry containers. Most laundry containers are made from cardboard or plastic, both of which can be recycled. Make sure that you adequately rinse and/or empty your containers before recycling them, ensuring that there is no residue left in the bottom. 

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Recycle your clothing 

It’s not just laundry containers that can be recycled, you can also recycle your clothing. If you notice that you have clothing that you don’t wear often, donate them to a local charity. This will ensure that your clothing gets rehomed rather than being added to the 92 million tons of textile waste created each year. Alternatively, if your clothing is becoming worn or ripped, you could create something new from your scraps. Whether you are an avid sewer and can create a new garment, or you simply use your ripped clothing as a cleaning rag, you can give even the most worn down piece of clothing a new life. 

Photo by Julia M Cameron from Pexels

How Laundryheap is doing their bit

At Laundryheap we are dedicated to improving the way we work to be more environmentally friendly. For example, we offer our customers the option of an eco friendly route. This means that our drivers are given a wider time slot to collect and redeliver customers laundry so that orders can be grouped together and we can use less fuel. As well as our eco routes, Laundryheap also uses e-bikes in certain areas to reduce the carbon emissions emitted whilst picking up and delivering laundry.

To book your Laundryheap service simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.

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Why do we need clean beaches?

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Every day 8 million pieces of litter enter the sea. This includes plastic bags, metal cans, fishing nets, and cigarettes. Beach clean-ups are essential in preventing human waste from reaching the ocean and causing more damage to our environment. These are just 5 of the reasons they are so important. 

  • Beaches in the ecosystem
  • Saving marine animals
  • A thriving economy 
  • Limit illness 
  • A safer environment 

Beaches in the ecosystem 

Beaches are an integral part of our ecosystem. They provide a home for thousands of marine species, some of which can’t be seen by the naked eye. These tiny organisms are essential in the process of seawater filtration and nutrient recycling, which gives us fresh water to drink. In addition to this, many marine creatures, such as sea turtles, use beaches to nest and lay eggs. If beaches continue to be polluted, these species will have no space to nest, leading to their extinction, and a drastic shift in the food chain. 

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Saving marine animals 

8.3 million tonnes of plastic is discarded in the ocean every year, killing 1 million marine animals. Beach clean-ups lower the chances of species coming into contact with and being harmed by waste left on the beach. What may seem like only a plastic bottle, could cause serious harm to marine life, so it’s best to pick it up and eliminate the risk. 

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A thriving economy 

Beaches attract millions of tourists to coastal locations, encouraging them to explore not only the beach but the local attractions. Globally, tourism makes up for 1 in 4 jobs, making it a financially viable industry we must continue growing. If our beaches are overly polluted, tourists won’t be interested in visiting coastal areas and spending money on local businesses, resulting in global job losses.

Limit illness

The pollution we put into the ocean can end up making us sick. The average seafood eater will consume 11,000 fragments of plastic every year, the chemicals of which can make you incredibly ill. Picking up as much plastic as possible from our beaches will prevent it from polluting the waters and the marine life we may end up eating, lessening our chances of becoming ill. 

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A safer environment 

Polluted beaches filled with discarded litter are not only damaging to the ecosystem but are also incredibly dangerous for visitors. Broken glass, plastic bags, and cigarette butts can cause serious harm to anyone strolling down the beach who may happen to accidentally step on them. The risk of damage increases for children who are more likely to pick up pieces of rubbish and mistake them for toys or ingestible items. It’s simply safer in all manners to pick up litter as soon as you see it. 

Photo by Ben Mack from Pexels

Whilst you help clean up your local beach, we will help clean up your laundry pile. Book your Laundryheap order now by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. If you are residing in Dallas, use the code TRY25US to get 25% off of your first Laundryheap order.


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How do you teach children to be environmentally conscious?

Climate change is rapidly altering our world, and we all need to be doing our best to be environmentally conscious. This includes teaching children about climate change and how we can save the planet.

  • Make recycling fun 
  • Show them how amazing the great outdoors is
  • Involve them in food changes
  • Teach them with fun experiments
  • Make energy-saving fun
  • Show them different ways to travel 
  • Limit the amount of single-use plastic in your house
  • Encourage a love of animals 

Make recycling fun 

Recycling helps reduce the pollution caused by waste and reduces the demand for creating new products. Up to 75% of all waste can be recycled, and it’s as easy as separating your rubbish into recyclable and non-recyclable bins. To encourage children to recycle, make the task fun. For example, you could let them decorate the recycling bin using recyclable materials, such as paper. This will help teach them the different recyclable materials, whilst allowing them to be creative. Making recycling less of a chore and more exciting will help children begin to understand what recycling is, how it is done, and why it is important. 

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Show them how amazing the great outdoors is

Nature is amazing and something that must be shared with children. Whether you take them on daily walks around the park, explore a nature reserve, or take a trek around a farm, encourage your children to be outside and exploring nature. If you notice that your local streets and parks are polluted with litter, you could take your children litter picking, explaining along the way the damage of litter to the environment. The more environmentally enthused children are, the more likely they will be to protect it. 

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Involve them in food changes

From farming animals to throwing away leftovers, food consumption has a considerable impact on the environment. There are several ways that we can reduce the environmental impact of our food consumption including eating less meat, choosing seasonal food options, and growing our own fruit and vegetables. Allow children to explore different food changes with you, and be part of the process from the very beginning. If you are growing your own plants, let your children help plant and maintain the seeds. Create a colour-coded calendar with your children to assess when a certain food is in season. Let them help cook meals on a daily basis. Most importantly, encourage them to have an interest in their food and where it comes from. 

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Teach them with fun experiments 

The climate crisis can be difficult to understand, even as an adult. To get children to begin to understand the changing world, and the importance of preventing these changes, you can teach them using fun and interactive experiments. For example, to show them how pollution works fill two cups halfway with water and add dilutant juice, or food colouring, to one cup. You can now show them that adding clean water can not change the coloured water back and that by mixing the coloured water with the clean water you only change the colour of the clear water. This will help better explain how pollution spreads and can open a conversation about the effects of pollution and how it can be limited.

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 Make energy-saving fun

We all need to be doing our best to reduce our carbon footprint and save energy. This can be difficult when there are children about, which is why you can encourage them to save energy by making it fun. Encourage your children to switch off lights by making it a part of their nightly routine. Make a competition to see who can save the most energy with an award for the winner. Have an energy-saving evening doing activities that use as little energy as possible. Try and be as inventive and creative as possible to encourage the children to save energy and be environmentally conscious. 

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Show them different ways to travel

Car pollution is one of the major causes of global warming, which is why we should be teaching children about alternative ways to travel. Encouraging children to walk is not only great for the environment but is a good way to get them exercising. For longer journeys, consider taking public transport rather than a car, and explain on your journey the environmental benefits of taking public transport. You may also want to explain the advances in electric cars and how they help prevent car pollution. 

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Limit the amount of single-use plastic in your house

Single-use plastics include plastic bags, drinks containers, disposable cutlery, and wet wipes, amongst other household items. If you limit children’s exposure to single-use plastics they will be less likely to use them throughout their life. There are many ways to avoid using single-use plastics, such as using bags for life, stocking up on reusable drink bottles, and using bamboo alternatives. Whilst transitioning away from single-use plastics, explain to children the harmful effects plastic has on the environment and why we should be limiting the amount we use. 

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Encourage a love of animals 

Animals are an important part of the survival of our planet, which is why we should be encouraging children to care for them. Over 500 species have gone extinct since the 1700s, and we can’t afford to lose any more. It is important that we educate children on the role that animals play in the survival of our planet, and thoroughly explain why they are going extinct and how to stop this. Encouraging a love of animals can be as simple as getting a pet, visiting a farm, or simply watching animal documentaries. We need to protect all the animals inhabiting our planet and conserve their habitats in any way possible. 

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At Laundryheap, we are committed to being environmentally conscious, which is why we offer eco-friendly delivery times and use E-bikes. To book your environmentally conscious Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to wash reusable nappies

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Reusable nappies are a great alternative to their single-use counterpart. Firstly, because they can be used multiple times, they reduce the amount of single-use plastic being used. In addition, because you don’t have to constantly re-buy nappies, you can save yourself a significant amount of money.

Here is how you keep re-usable nappies clean and ready for multiple uses. 

  • What are reusable nappies?
  • Are they as effective as single-use nappies? 
  • How to wash reusable cloth nappies

What are reusable nappies? 

Reusable nappies are nappies that can be used multiple times. They are often made from cotton, and are made up of an absorbent inner layer that contains a washable or disposable liner, and a waterproof outer layer. You can buy them in a range of sizes to fit all babies, and with a range of fastenings so you can decide which is easiest for you. In addition to the environmental and cost effective benefits of using reusable nappies, they are also chemical-free. 

Are they as effective as single-use nappies?

Reusable nappies are just as effective as single-use nappies. Before you use one it is advised to wash it so that the material becomes as absorbent as possible. Once you have done this you should not experience any difficulties with absorbency. 

If you are experiencing leaking it could be due to a detergent build-up, a poor fit, or a damaged PUL, which can happen if the nappy is dried at too high a heat. 

Image by Mahesh Patel from Pixabay

How to wash reusable nappies 

Begin by lifting the nappy liner out of the nappy. If you are using reusable nappy liners, shake any loose waste into the toilet. If you are using a disposable liner, dispose of it in the appropriate bin. 

Once the liner has been taken care of, place your nappy in a nappy bin, or any container with a tight-fitting lid. It’s always best to place a mesh laundry bag inside your container so that when it is full you don’t have to handle the individual nappies. 

When you have enough reusable nappies for a wash load, place them into your washing machine with a cap of non-bio powder. Avoid using liquid detergent and fabric softener as they can affect the absorbency of the material. Set your washing machine to 60 degrees to ensure that all the bacteria from the nappies is disposed of. Some antibacterial washing powders can clean in temperatures as low as 30 degrees, however, unless stated on the box, it’s best to wash your nappies at 60 degrees. 

Once your machine has finished, you can dry your nappies. It’s best to dry them in direct sunlight, however, if this is not achievable, you can tumble dry them on a low heat setting, or leave them on a drying rack

Reusable nappies need to be washed frequently, but, if you adequately care for them, they can last a lifetime. 

Image by Hannah Spray

Whilst you look after the reusable nappies, we’ll look after you. Book your Laundryheap service by visiting the Laundryheap website, or by downloading the free Laundryheap app.