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Singapore- The city of the future 

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Photo by Elina Sazonova from Pexels

Singapore is a global leader in technology, sustainability, and environmentalism. As COP26 brings together just under 200 of the worlds leaders to discuss the future of our planet, these are just some of the ways that Singapore has become the city of the future.

  • Aquaponics farm
  • Technology farming
  • Innovative structures 
  • Supertrees
  • Cloud Forest

Aquaponics farm 

Singapore imports 90% of its food. Food contributes up to one third of the global greenhouse gas emissions damaging our planet. The Fairmount Singapore and The Stamford hotels are attempting to help combat the colossal amount of food Singapore imports by using an aquaponic farm. The farm, found on the hotels’ roof, uses aquaculture and hydroponics to grow fish and plants. Despite only being 450 sq. m, the rooftop farm will produce 1,200kg of vegetables and 350kg of fish every month once fully operational. Currently, the farm can only grow vegetables and fish, however the hope is that it can branch out into fruits. Although small, the farm is helping Singapore’s achieve its goal of producing 30% of its nutritional needs by 2030. 

Technology farming 

Alongside the aquaponics farm, technology farming is thriving in Singapore. Singapore has very low food security, and with climate change brining unpredictable weather, there is no guarantee that food will reach the country. Technology farms across Singapore use advanced machinery and equipment to help grow food and bring more food security to the area. High-tech egg farms, contained fish farms, and vertical vegetable farms, are all examples of how Singapore is using technological advances to help improve their food security. 

Image by icon0 com

Innovative structures 

Singapore is home to some of the most iconic structures in the world, one of which is the CapitaGreen building. Located in the Central Business District, the building was designed to be a sustainable environment. Included in the structure is a customised façade that reduces the buildings temperature and a rooftop garden with 40 different types of plant. Additionally, the rooftop holds a 45m windcatcher that captures cool air and channels it to the floors below. Across the city from the CapitaGreen building is the Treehouse, a condo complex that is the world’s largest vertical garden. Each of the complex’s 4 towers is covered in greenery, reducing carbon dioxide and significantly lowering the building’s carbon footprint. 

Image by CEphoto, Uwe Aranas

Supertrees 

One of Singapore’s largest, and most iconic, environmental developments has been the nature park, Gardens by the Bay. Set in the heart of downtown Singapore, the park is made up of 3 waterfront gardens and a Supertree Grove. The Supertrees are home to more than 200 species of plants, and 11 of them have environmentally sustainable functions, such as harnessing solar energy. These alien-like structures are awe-inspiring to see, and are helping lower Singapore’s carbon footprint and increase their use of renewable energy. 

Photo by Nextvoyage from Pexels

Cloud Forest

Aside from the Supertree Grove, Singapore’s Gardens by the Bay is home to the Cloud Forest, a conservatoire. With a temperature between 23 and 25 degrees Celsius, the Cloud Forest is home to an array of exotic plants and a 35m tall indoor waterfall. It uses cutting-edge technology to minimise solar heat, de-humidify air, generate energy, and harness heat waste. It is a beautiful spectacle which is both breath-taking and environmentally conscious.

Photo by Palu Malerba from Pexels

At Laundryheap we are dedicated to lowering our carbon footprint to do our bit to help save the planet. To book your Laundryheap order head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.

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